Score
Title
10070
What image or scene from a children's movie/show did you find disturbing?
5520
What's your weirdest quirk that people give you shit for?
2201
What immediately put you off someone you once liked?
30544
Reddit, what is a really inappropriate question you’ve always wanted to ask?
1826
What's your internet "white whale" (something you've seen only once but want to find again)?
668
If diseases had slogans, what would they be?
366
Cruise ship staff of reddit (cleaners in particular), what are some disturbing secrets passengers should know?
348
What Simpsons quote is memorable to you?
876
What lyric will get a song stuck in everyone's head?
160
NSFW Undercover cops of Reddit, what's the most fucked up thing you've experienced while undercover? [NSFW][Serious]
243
[Serious] What are you oddly fascinated with?
214
What unanswered question from a movie bothers you the most?
493
What is the WORST advice you were ever given?
3206
English teachers of Reddit, what sort of strange or awkward personal details have students revealed to you through essays?
15164
Those of you who've actually had sex with a friends mom or dad, how did it go down?
332
What's an upbeat pop song where the lyrics actually tell a not-so-upbeat story?
3852
[Serious] People who ran way from home and never came back, where did you go and how's life now?
43751
What innocent question has someone asked you that secretly crushed you a little inside?
118
What is a song you don’t play at a Funeral?
789
How would you describe some historical events in clickbait form?
907
What's something a teacher did to you as a child that you're still salty about?
435
European members of reddit, what are some sexual normalities in your country? What are some things you wish were/weren't as common in the bedroom?
82
If you could download into your brain **ALL** of the knowledge of just **ONE** subject, what would it be and why?
103
Morning people of Reddit how do you do it?
5419
NSFW If MythBusters had a “Rated-R/NSFW” episode, what would you want them to test? [NSFW]
53
What professions are filled with arrogant people?
35
What is the rudest way someone has ended a relationship with you?
53
Dear reddit, Mattresses can have up to a 900% markup. What else has obscene markups?
647
If you devoted 30 minutes a day to it, what could you accomplish by 2020?
252
Reddits,How do you cope with deep-set existential dread and the realization that everything in your life is ultimately meaningless and temporary?
11990
What company will never see another dime of your money?
77
Reddit, if you had to delete every subreddit besides one, which subreddit would you save?
19
Non-Americans, what American stereotype that wasn’t true shocked you the most?
32
What is the most expensive item you have ever bought and haven't regretted (other than a home or car)? [Serious]
27
People who microwave fish at work, why do you think this is OK?
53
What are you never too old for?
4747
What modern trend do you not understand?
1507
What industry are millennials definitely NOT killing?
26
Why do online job applications make you upload a resume just to type it all out again?
18
Reddit, what are some disgusting habits that you have that you'd only admit anonymously?
3216 ghoulclub Bad Science by Ben Goldacre. It deals with interpreting statistics; recognizing false equivalencies; probability; critically assessing those ”clinical trials” advertised by people selling their bullshit detox pills, and so much more.
16299 [deleted] [deleted]
4450 Dogsafe It's been a while since I read it, I seem to remember that it's pretty engaging on balance, but there are some dry patches to struggle through. Your mileage may vary. **The Demon-Haunted World** by Carl Sagan is well worth a read - learning how to think and how to question is an important foundation to build knowledge on. The book discusses the importance of science and rationality, and how we determine what is true and what is isn't. I was googling it to double check the spelling and found that this quote from the book (published in 1995) has been causing a bit of a stir last year. > Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or grandchildren’s time — when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.
2312 Bukowskibabe Thinking, fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman is absolutely amazing.
1195 UniqueUsername69ps Meditations - Marcus Aurelius
261 Ms_DragonCat How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff
2183 Riderz_of_Brohan **FICTION:** Siddhartha by Herman Hesse. Was a pretty great book that made me think about life differently. It explores a lot about what "enlightenment" means and how that's achieved. It touches on a lot of aspects of what spirituality means and what life's meaning is. About how individually a lot of stuff we do by itself is pretty irrelevant, but when taken together forms a bigger purpose. **NON-FICTION:** The Big Short by Michael Lewis. It's a pretty cliche answer, but if you liked the movie you have to big the book a spin. It's much more detailed and gives you a great overview of an insanely complicated concept and sequence of events. Very few books explain the WHY of what happened, and The Big Short is a great overview of the banking system within the global economy and what went wrong in 2008 and why it toppled over
440 pointsouterrors The Eternal Golden Braid. It's a bit heavy, but explores a lot of science/art.
132 stehr98 "Man's Search for Meaning" - Victor Frankl Really helped me getting a sense of what meaning in life really is.
58 kissmyteeth The Knowledge by Lewis Dartnell. It's a post-apocalyptic survival guide and its aim is to both preserve humanity and also to preserve our technology as much as possible in order to prevent a slide back to the dark ages once the world starts repopulating. Every page is full of knowledge that's laid out in such a way that it's easily memorable and it's all useful.
311 Vox-Triarii I came a little late to the party, but if you're looking for something in the field of mathematics that is still very interesting to the average person, I know a few good ones. Mathematics doesn't have to be boring at all, it's something that has interested me since I was a child. ***Proofs and Refutations*** **by Imre Lakatos** This book is good for getting a layman-friendly introduction to pure mathematics. The book is written like a dialogue, and despite the superficial complexity of what they're talking about, it's very easy to follow even if you've never considered yourself good at math. ***The Road to Reality*** **by Roger Penrose** To be honest, this book gets way more of a bad rap than it deserves. Some think at first glance that it's too complex for laymen, or that it's too simple for the experienced. However, this book is helpful for both kinds of people. Aside from a few parts, this is a book the average person can understand. ***A Book of Abstract Algebra*** **by Charles Pinter** I have never met another book that can work even ordinary people into excitement about abstract algebra like this book can. It's an amazing introduction to the subject. Out of the three books I've mentioned, it'd be the least accessible, but if you're willing to dig up those Algebra II courses you took in High School, you'll understand this book.
1067 HanabinoOto Sophie's World is a fun primer on philosophy, told through a crazy lens.
3222 0 ghoulclub Bad Science by Ben Goldacre. It deals with interpreting statistics; recognizing false equivalencies; probability; critically assessing those ”clinical trials” advertised by people selling their bullshit detox pills, and so much more.
16297 0 [deleted] [deleted]
4457 0 Dogsafe It's been a while since I read it, I seem to remember that it's pretty engaging on balance, but there are some dry patches to struggle through. Your mileage may vary. **The Demon-Haunted World** by Carl Sagan is well worth a read - learning how to think and how to question is an important foundation to build knowledge on. The book discusses the importance of science and rationality, and how we determine what is true and what is isn't. I was googling it to double check the spelling and found that this quote from the book (published in 1995) has been causing a bit of a stir last year. > Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. I have a foreboding of an America in my children’s or grandchildren’s time — when the United States is a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those in authority; when, clutching our crystals and nervously consulting our horoscopes, our critical faculties in decline, unable to distinguish between what feels good and what’s true, we slide, almost without noticing, back into superstition and darkness.
2306 0 Bukowskibabe Thinking, fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman is absolutely amazing.
1192 0 UniqueUsername69ps Meditations - Marcus Aurelius
257 0 Ms_DragonCat How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff
2184 0 Riderz_of_Brohan **FICTION:** Siddhartha by Herman Hesse. Was a pretty great book that made me think about life differently. It explores a lot about what "enlightenment" means and how that's achieved. It touches on a lot of aspects of what spirituality means and what life's meaning is. About how individually a lot of stuff we do by itself is pretty irrelevant, but when taken together forms a bigger purpose. **NON-FICTION:** The Big Short by Michael Lewis. It's a pretty cliche answer, but if you liked the movie you have to big the book a spin. It's much more detailed and gives you a great overview of an insanely complicated concept and sequence of events. Very few books explain the WHY of what happened, and The Big Short is a great overview of the banking system within the global economy and what went wrong in 2008 and why it toppled over
446 0 pointsouterrors The Eternal Golden Braid. It's a bit heavy, but explores a lot of science/art.
131 0 stehr98 "Man's Search for Meaning" - Victor Frankl Really helped me getting a sense of what meaning in life really is.
55 0 kissmyteeth The Knowledge by Lewis Dartnell. It's a post-apocalyptic survival guide and its aim is to both preserve humanity and also to preserve our technology as much as possible in order to prevent a slide back to the dark ages once the world starts repopulating. Every page is full of knowledge that's laid out in such a way that it's easily memorable and it's all useful.
308 0 Vox-Triarii I came a little late to the party, but if you're looking for something in the field of mathematics that is still very interesting to the average person, I know a few good ones. Mathematics doesn't have to be boring at all, it's something that has interested me since I was a child. ***Proofs and Refutations*** **by Imre Lakatos** This book is good for getting a layman-friendly introduction to pure mathematics. The book is written like a dialogue, and despite the superficial complexity of what they're talking about, it's very easy to follow even if you've never considered yourself good at math. ***The Road to Reality*** **by Roger Penrose** To be honest, this book gets way more of a bad rap than it deserves. Some think at first glance that it's too complex for laymen, or that it's too simple for the experienced. However, this book is helpful for both kinds of people. Aside from a few parts, this is a book the average person can understand. ***A Book of Abstract Algebra*** **by Charles Pinter** I have never met another book that can work even ordinary people into excitement about abstract algebra like this book can. It's an amazing introduction to the subject. Out of the three books I've mentioned, it'd be the least accessible, but if you're willing to dig up those Algebra II courses you took in High School, you'll understand this book.
1070 0 HanabinoOto Sophie's World is a fun primer on philosophy, told through a crazy lens.