Score
Title
163
IamA / We Are the creators "Porn: The Game!". Slothing the day away, digesting Turkey & Whiskey AMA /Ask Us Anything!
24071
[AMA Request] a Comcast or ISP sysadmin or engineer who will be part of rolling out anti-Net Neutrality service changes like website pay walls and traffic throttling
13
Hey, /r/IndianCountry! Radmilla Cody and the K'é Infoshop Youth Collective here. AUAA! (Crosspost from /r/IndianCountry)
3
[AMA Request] Current or former factory slaughterhouse worker (large-scale operations only)
2
IamA online therapist who helps people deal with holiday stress. AMA!
29729
IamA Guy Who Setup a Low-Latency Rural Wireless ISP That Launches in January, AMA!
7
[AMA Request] Twitch CEO or an employee
14
IamA Ex-Dealership Technician (in Canada) for 8 years, Mechanic for 11. AMA!
3
[AMA Request] A graduate of a Youth Challenge Academy program
6
[AMA Request] Kevin Richard Parker
190221
Protect Net Neutrality. Save the Internet.
640
I am Tim Ferriss, host of “The Tim Ferriss Show” and author of “Tribe of Mentors.” AMA!
443
[AMA Request] Alex Nguyen, the only person to actually file a formal complaint on behalf of Net Neutrality
181
I'm Olympic Luger Erin Hamlin. Want to know what it's like to slide down a track at 90 mph without looking? Ask me Anything as I getting ready to to qualify for the Winter Games.
119
We are Emily Axford and Brian Murphy from CollegeHumor, Adam Ruins Everything, and a new sketch comedy show called Hot Date airing Wednesdays at 8 on Pop TV. Ask us anything!
12
IAmA lawyer (and former YouTube star) who risked everything to start a YouTube channel for kids.
0
[AMA Request] Kurt Hugo Schneider
8851
IamA butcher with more than 30 years of experience here to answer your questions about meat for Thanksgiving or any time of year. AMA!
26
I am a west coast tree faller working in BC. My job is usually ranked 1st or 2nd most dangerous in North America. I cut down many trees every working day, some big some small, some that one of you will end up buying as lumber in your local lumber store. Ask me anything!
20
IamA neuroscientist who studies vision in marine animals and I've been in a submersible with Sir David Attenborough. AMA!
30
I am Joe Biel, a book publisher and person with autism. Ask me anything!
5957
IamA Professional career advisors/resume writers who have helped thousands of people switch careers and land jobs by connecting them directly to hiring managers. Back here to help the reddit community for the next 12 hours. Ask Us Anything!
776
I'm a reporter that spent months investigating how the viral hoax Pizzagate gained steam and got dangerous. Ask me anything.
22
[AMA Request] Coyote Peterson
9
I am James Schwartz RN, BSN, Owner of CascadeHigh, an Oregon licensed Cannabis Cultivator AMA
7
[AMA Request] Original Microsoft Xbox Live 1.0 Developer / Team Member
16
[AMA Request] The North Korean Defector
14082
We’re Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg here to talk our new sci-fi action-comedy on Hulu: Future Man!
30
I've worked Black Friday at stores such as Best Buy, Tilly's, DSW, and Toys R Us. Ask Me Anything about the Black Friday Secrets or retail in general!
7
[AMA Request] Self-taught professional programmer
3
AMA Request: someone who works at a hotel
5509
[AMA Request] Cast of the early 2000's TV show "Zoom"
3
[IAmA Request] A representative of Comcast and their stance on Net Neutrality.
0
IamA Academic and Informational Writing Specialist
983
Hi Reddit! I'm Francesca Marie Smith, the voice of Helga Pataki on Hey Arnold! AMA!
6
[AMA Request] A contestant on the Japanese game show ‘Slippery Stairs’
1148
IamA Ex Queens Guard, served 4 years. AMA!
25
[AMA request] Lego designers/master builders
15
IamA Indie Game Developer Releasing Our First Game AMA!
3
[AMA Request] Standardized Test Writer (SAT,ACT, State Exam, etc...)
223 nothing_showing I can answer some of these for you. Edit: 17yrs professional ff in a city of ~400K people. It looks like you posted the same question a couple days ago with no response...? LMK if you (or in the spirit of an actual AMA, anyone else does) still need any info. tl;dr of my thoughts on this project: any wagon or other device is unnecessary, and would be counter-productive
40 emnc91 I would try posting in [r/firefighting](https://www.reddit.com/r/Firefighting/). You'll get lots of feedback from people from lots of different styles of departments and duties.
35 [deleted] [deleted]
21 OtterLarkin 5 yrs here. Your initial attack usually is simply an axe and a hose. Considering the limited space we work in I don't know how a wagon would work on stairs space wise in case of emergency. Fire science is going the way of positive pressure ventilation so I think there might be something to improve upon there and/or make the wagon more all terrain for wildfire uses. Don't know if that helps. Good luck!
13 FiremanJon Oh boy, this is quite complicated. I'm a firefighter in a metro area with about 15 years of experience. To create a device to travel up and down staircases with any type of load would be extremely difficult and have limited use. I don't think a wheelbarrow type device would work well. Ladders are to large and would not fit. Even if you laid a ladder flat, it would not make the corners in a staircase. An irons set would fit, but they're easy enough to carry. A RIT pack would also fit, but also easy enough carry. A house pack is a segment of house that attaches to the stairwell stand pipe system and its also small enough to carry. I suppose you could put all of that in a device like you're thinking of and have it carry everything. Often times one firefighter is carrying just one, or maybe two of these items while going up stairs. Having these items in hand makes them more manageable when working around other firefighters, or the general public that's evacuating. Getting around corners with a long pike pole or ladder also takes some manipulation of the tool. I honestly think creating better, lightweight tools is the best option. Firefighters will always need to wear their own air bottle on their back. I wouldn't want that anywhere else. In the event of a floor or ceiling collapse, I want that on my body so I have breathing air. I personally wouldn't want that carry in any device. Honestly, I'm not sure what the best option is. Firefighting is labor intensive work. Stay fit, exercise, and train hard to limit your fatigue. I think for now, that'll help more than anything else.
11 mzarif Look up a firefighting high rise pack. It contains typically a length of hose- 100', nozzle, valve and possibly some adaptors. In buildings with standpipes we carry this up. The fire truck connects to the bottom of the standpipe, we hook up at fire floor level With the high rise pack. Saves you from having to jump hose up the stairs. Hypothetically if a machine was doing the lifting, I guess I would take extra air bottles, forcible entry tools, a water can or fire extinguisher, and some extra rolls of hose.
19 Strafe01 Yesterday for ARMY ROTC we ran up 77 flights of stairs with 75lbs on our back in honor of the firefighters in 9/11. I gassed out after 50 lol; firefighters, i will always be grateful for your selfless service to our country.
7 TurdFerguson812 I've served as a firefighter in both urban and rural areas. From the urban perspective, I agree with others here that a device to transport equipment inside of a building, up stairs, etc., would be difficult to use. Having said that, maybe I can give you a few alternative ideas: As others have said, moving victims remains a big challenge for fire and EMS. We already use a device called a "stair chair" to bring medical patients down stairs, but perhaps that concept could be improved upon. - As a fire officer, a major concern is always what we call "personnel accountability". Knowing where your crews are (for example, within a building) is a concern, both from a tactical and safety perspective. - In my current role, I'm largely responsible for wildland firefighting. To me, this is an area of the fire service that is ripe for improvement. - As an example, wildland firefighters generally don't carry or wear breathing protection, other than some simple filter type "masks" (and frankly, most of us use little more than a bandana). This is because we often have to hike long distances over rough terrain, and we are already loaded down with equipment. If someone could design a device that provides good respiratory protection in a lightweight, compact form factor, I think there would be good demand. - Another trend I see, particularly in the wildland arena, is the increased use of mobile technology. Things like GPS, laptops, smartphones, and even portable radios are being improved and adapted to the fire service. Our limitations usually involve connectivity, power, and of course weight. Given that, you may want to consider addressing those limitations. For example, I recently saw a device on Kickstarter that takes the battery pack for our handheld radio and adds a USB charger, so you can charge a mobile device. It's a simple idea, but I'm sure there's demand for it. Sorry if some of these ideas are a little off track from your original post, but hopefully there's some food for thought.
220 0 nothing_showing I can answer some of these for you. Edit: 17yrs professional ff in a city of ~400K people. It looks like you posted the same question a couple days ago with no response...? LMK if you (or in the spirit of an actual AMA, anyone else does) still need any info. tl;dr of my thoughts on this project: any wagon or other device is unnecessary, and would be counter-productive
39 0 emnc91 I would try posting in [r/firefighting](https://www.reddit.com/r/Firefighting/). You'll get lots of feedback from people from lots of different styles of departments and duties.
38 0 [deleted] [deleted]
19 0 OtterLarkin 5 yrs here. Your initial attack usually is simply an axe and a hose. Considering the limited space we work in I don't know how a wagon would work on stairs space wise in case of emergency. Fire science is going the way of positive pressure ventilation so I think there might be something to improve upon there and/or make the wagon more all terrain for wildfire uses. Don't know if that helps. Good luck!
13 0 FiremanJon Oh boy, this is quite complicated. I'm a firefighter in a metro area with about 15 years of experience. To create a device to travel up and down staircases with any type of load would be extremely difficult and have limited use. I don't think a wheelbarrow type device would work well. Ladders are to large and would not fit. Even if you laid a ladder flat, it would not make the corners in a staircase. An irons set would fit, but they're easy enough to carry. A RIT pack would also fit, but also easy enough carry. A house pack is a segment of house that attaches to the stairwell stand pipe system and its also small enough to carry. I suppose you could put all of that in a device like you're thinking of and have it carry everything. Often times one firefighter is carrying just one, or maybe two of these items while going up stairs. Having these items in hand makes them more manageable when working around other firefighters, or the general public that's evacuating. Getting around corners with a long pike pole or ladder also takes some manipulation of the tool. I honestly think creating better, lightweight tools is the best option. Firefighters will always need to wear their own air bottle on their back. I wouldn't want that anywhere else. In the event of a floor or ceiling collapse, I want that on my body so I have breathing air. I personally wouldn't want that carry in any device. Honestly, I'm not sure what the best option is. Firefighting is labor intensive work. Stay fit, exercise, and train hard to limit your fatigue. I think for now, that'll help more than anything else.
10 0 mzarif Look up a firefighting high rise pack. It contains typically a length of hose- 100', nozzle, valve and possibly some adaptors. In buildings with standpipes we carry this up. The fire truck connects to the bottom of the standpipe, we hook up at fire floor level With the high rise pack. Saves you from having to jump hose up the stairs. Hypothetically if a machine was doing the lifting, I guess I would take extra air bottles, forcible entry tools, a water can or fire extinguisher, and some extra rolls of hose.
19 0 Strafe01 Yesterday for ARMY ROTC we ran up 77 flights of stairs with 75lbs on our back in honor of the firefighters in 9/11. I gassed out after 50 lol; firefighters, i will always be grateful for your selfless service to our country.
7 0 TurdFerguson812 I've served as a firefighter in both urban and rural areas. From the urban perspective, I agree with others here that a device to transport equipment inside of a building, up stairs, etc., would be difficult to use. Having said that, maybe I can give you a few alternative ideas: As others have said, moving victims remains a big challenge for fire and EMS. We already use a device called a "stair chair" to bring medical patients down stairs, but perhaps that concept could be improved upon. - As a fire officer, a major concern is always what we call "personnel accountability". Knowing where your crews are (for example, within a building) is a concern, both from a tactical and safety perspective. - In my current role, I'm largely responsible for wildland firefighting. To me, this is an area of the fire service that is ripe for improvement. - As an example, wildland firefighters generally don't carry or wear breathing protection, other than some simple filter type "masks" (and frankly, most of us use little more than a bandana). This is because we often have to hike long distances over rough terrain, and we are already loaded down with equipment. If someone could design a device that provides good respiratory protection in a lightweight, compact form factor, I think there would be good demand. - Another trend I see, particularly in the wildland arena, is the increased use of mobile technology. Things like GPS, laptops, smartphones, and even portable radios are being improved and adapted to the fire service. Our limitations usually involve connectivity, power, and of course weight. Given that, you may want to consider addressing those limitations. For example, I recently saw a device on Kickstarter that takes the battery pack for our handheld radio and adds a USB charger, so you can charge a mobile device. It's a simple idea, but I'm sure there's demand for it. Sorry if some of these ideas are a little off track from your original post, but hopefully there's some food for thought.