Score
Title
7651
[AMA Request] Primitive Technology Guy
1485
I am the first protestor to be violently attacked for interrupting Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdo?an's speech in NYC on Thursday. AMA!
5433
I'm Katee Sackhoff, but you might know me better as Captain Kara 'Starbuck' Thrace from BSG. AMA!
12390
I'm Tricia Helfer, actor, podcaster and Cylon. AMA!
62
We are Arctic and Antarctic scientists celebrating International Polar Week! Ask us anything!
7
I work in a Juvenile Detention Facility and work daily with first time offenders to young murderers. AMA!
2
IamA tech manager who quit to become a fantasy writer. My novel is now one of the highest rated fantasy debuts on Goodreads. AMA!
3
[AMA Request] A Cruise Ship Bartender
0
[AMA Request] Intelligence Analyst for the FBI, CIA or NSA
8890
I'm 18 and was raised without a social security number or birth certificate. AMA!
134
Hey Reddit, Quinn XCII here. AMA.
8
[AMA Request] A person with a Ph.D working on Machine Learning.
491
[AMA Request] Die Antwoord
0
[AMA Request] The Band "Steve 'N' Seagulls"
0
[AMA Request] Tom Hiddleston
18
Hi, I'm a solo indie game developer, who just spent 8000 hours making a weird game. Also, I don't roll my toothpaste tubes. AMA!
1306
I’m Jürgen Götz, neuroscientist. My lab has reversed Alzheimer’s symptoms in animal models. AMA.
25
I’m Craig Setzer, Chief Meteorologist for WFOR-TV, CBS4 Miami. I’m a hurricane and tornado expert, have been covering hurricane season in Florida for 21 years. This hurricane season has been particularly active, especially covering Hurricane Irma locally. AMA!
9
NSFW I’m an 18 year old online sex worker just out of high school. AMA! [NSFW]
13685
Hi, I’m Anthony Palma, founder of Jump, the “Netflix of Indie Games” service that launched on Tuesday. AMA!
3
[AMA Request] someone who has quit their job, sold all their belongings, and traveled the world
0
IamA wet towel fighter who posts his fights on youtube AMA!
16
I'm John Wise, founder of Loci, a company revolutionizing the patent and invention process, AMA!
9
I'm writer Doug Stanton. While reporting stories I've nearly drowned off Cape Horn waters, been mugged by jungle revolutionaries, played basketball with George Clooney, and took an acting lesson from Harrison Ford. AMA.
11
[crosspost] Director Darren Aronofsky is doing an AMA in /r/movies!
3
[AMA Request] Sue Mi Terry, Former CIA analyst and director for Korea, Japan, and oceanic affairs at the US National Security Council. Former National Intelligence Fellow. Former deputy national intelligence officer for East Asia at the National Intelligence Council.
10
[AMA Request] Anyone who has to translate Trump speeches into another language.
10
Hi I'm Mike, I'm a Rope Access Tech (Industrial abseiler) in the UK. AMA
5
[AMA request] Any member of congress willing to speak honestly about campaign finance and lobbying
5
[AMA Request] Someone from President Trump's speech-writing team (but not Stephen Miller)
0
[AMA Request] Any Celebrity Who Suffers From Fibromyalgia
100
I've been to North Korea 8 times over 12 years. Ask me anything. Headline: I made a documentary about exploring the border between China and North Korea - where tensions run high. AMA!
16248
I’m Nathan Runkle, founder of Mercy For Animals. We go undercover inside slaughterhouses and factory farms, fight “ag-gag” laws, and work to advance “clean meat” (meat grown in cell culture). AMA!
0
[crosspost - /r/books] I'm Irena Brignull, screenwriter and author of The Hawkweed series, and I'm here to chat about writing books and movies. AMA!
16
[AMA Request] Joji / FilthyFrankTV
0
[AMA request] A girl who has modeled for a big screen electronic gambling machine.
10
[AMA Request] William Shatner
13
I’m Alyssa Rosenberg, pop critic for The Washington Post and I’ve documented Ken Burns's process as he made “The Vietnam War.” AMA!
10
IamA Podcaster & Author. Season 2 of my current podcast, Malicious.Life (about Cyber Security) is out soon. I'm Ran Levi. AMA!
4
I am Paul Clements, and I am running for Congress as a Progressive Democrat in MI-06 [xpost r/Political_Revolution]
221 nothing_showing I can answer some of these for you. Edit: 17yrs professional ff in a city of ~400K people. It looks like you posted the same question a couple days ago with no response...? LMK if you (or in the spirit of an actual AMA, anyone else does) still need any info. tl;dr of my thoughts on this project: any wagon or other device is unnecessary, and would be counter-productive
41 emnc91 I would try posting in [r/firefighting](https://www.reddit.com/r/Firefighting/). You'll get lots of feedback from people from lots of different styles of departments and duties.
36 ensendarie I was a firefighter for 8 years in a rural area. did a lot of interior attack on single/double story homes, none of our apartment buildings went up while I was on the clock. It's got to be cheap. If I'm dragging this thing into a building and it's time to GTFO, I'm not interested in having to worry about being the guy that left behind the deputy chief's latest expensive toy. I know that gear is never as important as one's life etc. but that doesn't change how much it sucks to get shit on by someone in power that doesn't give a shit about people. 1.) I would take a charged hose and {axe or halligan bar} in my hands. Flashlight clipped on, SCBA on my back. Ladders never go into a building, only used on the outside for entry/egress. Already right there I've got probably 15-20kg on me, not counting the weight of the hose I'm dragging. A rescue crew might go in with rope instead of a hose (depends on department policies and situation) and with an extra 'rescue' scba. Some crews might only have half the guys equipped with axes, or maybe only one axe in the crew. an attack crew facing an Apartment building might take a hose and nozzle for hookup inside the apartment building instead of trying to drag a charged hose up several stories. Some crazy bastards might take cutting equipment into a building if they think they've got time to cut through a door or wall to access an area where someone is trapped. 2.) got me. all of that sounds like it's going to add time to the entry. If I'm inside a burning building I'm either searching for occupants or doing interior attack. In either case, seconds count. 3.) absolutely. If we're taking a pack mule in with our important shit, if it gets stuck in a corner or stairwell it's worse than useless -it's now impeding my work. 4.) depends on what the design of the beast is. can't really comment on that without knowing what we're working with. 5.) if it's under its own power, it's got to be electric. a smoke filled stairwell won't provide enough O^2 to run a gas motor. If it's not self propelled, it's got to be light enough that I don't curse your name when using it to move gear.
20 OtterLarkin 5 yrs here. Your initial attack usually is simply an axe and a hose. Considering the limited space we work in I don't know how a wagon would work on stairs space wise in case of emergency. Fire science is going the way of positive pressure ventilation so I think there might be something to improve upon there and/or make the wagon more all terrain for wildfire uses. Don't know if that helps. Good luck!
13 FiremanJon Oh boy, this is quite complicated. I'm a firefighter in a metro area with about 15 years of experience. To create a device to travel up and down staircases with any type of load would be extremely difficult and have limited use. I don't think a wheelbarrow type device would work well. Ladders are to large and would not fit. Even if you laid a ladder flat, it would not make the corners in a staircase. An irons set would fit, but they're easy enough to carry. A RIT pack would also fit, but also easy enough carry. A house pack is a segment of house that attaches to the stairwell stand pipe system and its also small enough to carry. I suppose you could put all of that in a device like you're thinking of and have it carry everything. Often times one firefighter is carrying just one, or maybe two of these items while going up stairs. Having these items in hand makes them more manageable when working around other firefighters, or the general public that's evacuating. Getting around corners with a long pike pole or ladder also takes some manipulation of the tool. I honestly think creating better, lightweight tools is the best option. Firefighters will always need to wear their own air bottle on their back. I wouldn't want that anywhere else. In the event of a floor or ceiling collapse, I want that on my body so I have breathing air. I personally wouldn't want that carry in any device. Honestly, I'm not sure what the best option is. Firefighting is labor intensive work. Stay fit, exercise, and train hard to limit your fatigue. I think for now, that'll help more than anything else.
10 mzarif Look up a firefighting high rise pack. It contains typically a length of hose- 100', nozzle, valve and possibly some adaptors. In buildings with standpipes we carry this up. The fire truck connects to the bottom of the standpipe, we hook up at fire floor level With the high rise pack. Saves you from having to jump hose up the stairs. Hypothetically if a machine was doing the lifting, I guess I would take extra air bottles, forcible entry tools, a water can or fire extinguisher, and some extra rolls of hose.
19 Strafe01 Yesterday for ARMY ROTC we ran up 77 flights of stairs with 75lbs on our back in honor of the firefighters in 9/11. I gassed out after 50 lol; firefighters, i will always be grateful for your selfless service to our country.
7 TurdFerguson812 I've served as a firefighter in both urban and rural areas. From the urban perspective, I agree with others here that a device to transport equipment inside of a building, up stairs, etc., would be difficult to use. Having said that, maybe I can give you a few alternative ideas: As others have said, moving victims remains a big challenge for fire and EMS. We already use a device called a "stair chair" to bring medical patients down stairs, but perhaps that concept could be improved upon. - As a fire officer, a major concern is always what we call "personnel accountability". Knowing where your crews are (for example, within a building) is a concern, both from a tactical and safety perspective. - In my current role, I'm largely responsible for wildland firefighting. To me, this is an area of the fire service that is ripe for improvement. - As an example, wildland firefighters generally don't carry or wear breathing protection, other than some simple filter type "masks" (and frankly, most of us use little more than a bandana). This is because we often have to hike long distances over rough terrain, and we are already loaded down with equipment. If someone could design a device that provides good respiratory protection in a lightweight, compact form factor, I think there would be good demand. - Another trend I see, particularly in the wildland arena, is the increased use of mobile technology. Things like GPS, laptops, smartphones, and even portable radios are being improved and adapted to the fire service. Our limitations usually involve connectivity, power, and of course weight. Given that, you may want to consider addressing those limitations. For example, I recently saw a device on Kickstarter that takes the battery pack for our handheld radio and adds a USB charger, so you can charge a mobile device. It's a simple idea, but I'm sure there's demand for it. Sorry if some of these ideas are a little off track from your original post, but hopefully there's some food for thought.
220 0 nothing_showing I can answer some of these for you. Edit: 17yrs professional ff in a city of ~400K people. It looks like you posted the same question a couple days ago with no response...? LMK if you (or in the spirit of an actual AMA, anyone else does) still need any info. tl;dr of my thoughts on this project: any wagon or other device is unnecessary, and would be counter-productive
38 0 emnc91 I would try posting in [r/firefighting](https://www.reddit.com/r/Firefighting/). You'll get lots of feedback from people from lots of different styles of departments and duties.
35 0 ensendarie I was a firefighter for 8 years in a rural area. did a lot of interior attack on single/double story homes, none of our apartment buildings went up while I was on the clock. It's got to be cheap. If I'm dragging this thing into a building and it's time to GTFO, I'm not interested in having to worry about being the guy that left behind the deputy chief's latest expensive toy. I know that gear is never as important as one's life etc. but that doesn't change how much it sucks to get shit on by someone in power that doesn't give a shit about people. 1.) I would take a charged hose and {axe or halligan bar} in my hands. Flashlight clipped on, SCBA on my back. Ladders never go into a building, only used on the outside for entry/egress. Already right there I've got probably 15-20kg on me, not counting the weight of the hose I'm dragging. A rescue crew might go in with rope instead of a hose (depends on department policies and situation) and with an extra 'rescue' scba. Some crews might only have half the guys equipped with axes, or maybe only one axe in the crew. an attack crew facing an Apartment building might take a hose and nozzle for hookup inside the apartment building instead of trying to drag a charged hose up several stories. Some crazy bastards might take cutting equipment into a building if they think they've got time to cut through a door or wall to access an area where someone is trapped. 2.) got me. all of that sounds like it's going to add time to the entry. If I'm inside a burning building I'm either searching for occupants or doing interior attack. In either case, seconds count. 3.) absolutely. If we're taking a pack mule in with our important shit, if it gets stuck in a corner or stairwell it's worse than useless -it's now impeding my work. 4.) depends on what the design of the beast is. can't really comment on that without knowing what we're working with. 5.) if it's under its own power, it's got to be electric. a smoke filled stairwell won't provide enough O^2 to run a gas motor. If it's not self propelled, it's got to be light enough that I don't curse your name when using it to move gear.
20 0 OtterLarkin 5 yrs here. Your initial attack usually is simply an axe and a hose. Considering the limited space we work in I don't know how a wagon would work on stairs space wise in case of emergency. Fire science is going the way of positive pressure ventilation so I think there might be something to improve upon there and/or make the wagon more all terrain for wildfire uses. Don't know if that helps. Good luck!
13 0 FiremanJon Oh boy, this is quite complicated. I'm a firefighter in a metro area with about 15 years of experience. To create a device to travel up and down staircases with any type of load would be extremely difficult and have limited use. I don't think a wheelbarrow type device would work well. Ladders are to large and would not fit. Even if you laid a ladder flat, it would not make the corners in a staircase. An irons set would fit, but they're easy enough to carry. A RIT pack would also fit, but also easy enough carry. A house pack is a segment of house that attaches to the stairwell stand pipe system and its also small enough to carry. I suppose you could put all of that in a device like you're thinking of and have it carry everything. Often times one firefighter is carrying just one, or maybe two of these items while going up stairs. Having these items in hand makes them more manageable when working around other firefighters, or the general public that's evacuating. Getting around corners with a long pike pole or ladder also takes some manipulation of the tool. I honestly think creating better, lightweight tools is the best option. Firefighters will always need to wear their own air bottle on their back. I wouldn't want that anywhere else. In the event of a floor or ceiling collapse, I want that on my body so I have breathing air. I personally wouldn't want that carry in any device. Honestly, I'm not sure what the best option is. Firefighting is labor intensive work. Stay fit, exercise, and train hard to limit your fatigue. I think for now, that'll help more than anything else.
11 0 mzarif Look up a firefighting high rise pack. It contains typically a length of hose- 100', nozzle, valve and possibly some adaptors. In buildings with standpipes we carry this up. The fire truck connects to the bottom of the standpipe, we hook up at fire floor level With the high rise pack. Saves you from having to jump hose up the stairs. Hypothetically if a machine was doing the lifting, I guess I would take extra air bottles, forcible entry tools, a water can or fire extinguisher, and some extra rolls of hose.
19 0 Strafe01 Yesterday for ARMY ROTC we ran up 77 flights of stairs with 75lbs on our back in honor of the firefighters in 9/11. I gassed out after 50 lol; firefighters, i will always be grateful for your selfless service to our country.
7 0 TurdFerguson812 I've served as a firefighter in both urban and rural areas. From the urban perspective, I agree with others here that a device to transport equipment inside of a building, up stairs, etc., would be difficult to use. Having said that, maybe I can give you a few alternative ideas: As others have said, moving victims remains a big challenge for fire and EMS. We already use a device called a "stair chair" to bring medical patients down stairs, but perhaps that concept could be improved upon. - As a fire officer, a major concern is always what we call "personnel accountability". Knowing where your crews are (for example, within a building) is a concern, both from a tactical and safety perspective. - In my current role, I'm largely responsible for wildland firefighting. To me, this is an area of the fire service that is ripe for improvement. - As an example, wildland firefighters generally don't carry or wear breathing protection, other than some simple filter type "masks" (and frankly, most of us use little more than a bandana). This is because we often have to hike long distances over rough terrain, and we are already loaded down with equipment. If someone could design a device that provides good respiratory protection in a lightweight, compact form factor, I think there would be good demand. - Another trend I see, particularly in the wildland arena, is the increased use of mobile technology. Things like GPS, laptops, smartphones, and even portable radios are being improved and adapted to the fire service. Our limitations usually involve connectivity, power, and of course weight. Given that, you may want to consider addressing those limitations. For example, I recently saw a device on Kickstarter that takes the battery pack for our handheld radio and adds a USB charger, so you can charge a mobile device. It's a simple idea, but I'm sure there's demand for it. Sorry if some of these ideas are a little off track from your original post, but hopefully there's some food for thought.