Score
Title
9418
Megathread: 2017 Hurricane Season
24
Earthquake Megathread
6172
If a nuclear bomb went off in Boston harbor could scientists tell after the fact who had manufactured it, do they leave distinct radioactive signatures?
5747
Why aren't there any orbitals after s, p, d and f?
16
What do sexes in fungus mean?
135
Do black holes have electromagnetic field?
4
Where does the "blast" portion of a nuclear explosion come from?
6
Do atmospheric CO2 measurements include a significant diurnal cycle?
8
How do bionic arms work?
4
Historically, when large numbers of sailboats/ships had to travel in formation as a fleet, are there different dynamics governing the movement of ships in the front, middle and rear of the group?
6
Why are non-differentiable continuous functions integrable?
9
Are Toucans (Americas) and Hornbills (Asia/Africa) an example of convergent evolution?
4
What are the estimated thicknesses for northern sea-ice at the height of the Pleistocene glaciation, and how are those thicknesses estimated?
7
Ask Anything Wednesday - Physics, Astronomy, Earth and Planetary Science
2
Why are rainbows in an arc shape and does the radius change?
4
Why do nuclei release energy when they fuse?
24
How many layers are there in a modern integrated circuit?
8
Why does the Earth's rotation effect Rockets and not Planes?
2
Are there plant/animal somatic hybrids?
2
Would the opposite of codependency issues be considered as unhealthy as codependency? Wherein any form of dependency is abhorrent to the person in question? Does this have a clinical classification?
60
Do people that have degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's lose their muscle memory as well?
20
How is it possible that something as large as a possible Planet 9 has completely evaded visual observation?
8154
There is a video on the Front Page about the Navy's Railgun being developed. What kind of energy, damage would these sort of rounds do?
8
Would global cooling create more land? If so, how much more land would be available before the whole earth freezes?
11
How did they measure hurricane wind speeds in the 1800's?
4125
In 1972 a woman fell 33,332 feet without dying. How is that possible?
12
How is it that scissors can curl ribbons?
12
What is happening at a molecular level when a knife cuts through nylon rope?
154
Could we railgun the Moon?
15
Why is caesium the largest atom? Shouldn't element 118 be the largest?
1
Why does your metabolism slow down with age?
7
Do snakes that can 'see' heat, such as ball pythons, compare their 'heat vision' with their normal vision?
17
[CHEMISTRY] How do chemical companies determine if one ingredient in a solution can be replaced by another?
2
In emergencies like on CDMX will using cellphone data on a very far state affect the capacity on CDMX cell towers to make calls and/or use cell phone data?
12
Can a human be allergic to any substance? As in, does every material have the potential to elicit an allergic response?
2
What defines an equation of state?
46
How is online gaming possible if there must be some delay?
5
Does my peripheral vision have a different latency than objects I look directly at?
15
Why is gold found in seams?
16
On an alien planet, would a regular compass still point true north?
11
Can someone with reading Aphasia "read" in Braille?
4
Would negative kelvin body always transfer heat to positive kelvin body?
1809 Madenmann If you boil water, you'll kill most pathogens living in it. Dissolved chemicals or particulates will remain, so if you boil brown water it'll still be brown. If whatever is making the water brown happens to be a toxin drinking the boiled water is still inadvisable. However, you can use boiling the water to clean it. Catch the steam, let it condense and have some clean water. We don't do that generally because it's a rather arduous process and it consumes a lot of energy.
10271 organiker Boiling water doesn't "clean" it. It does, however, kill certain harmful bacteria, which results in water that is safer to ingest.
1424 audiyon No, boiling water only kills living pathogens that can cause diseases. Anything dissolved or suspended in the water, eg. micro-plastics, salt, lead, bleach, will not be removed and will be left behind in a higher concentration after boiling. Water has to be **distilled** for it to be cleaned of other contaminants. See also: [Boiling water for potability](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling#For_making_water_potable) [Distillation](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distillation)
40 UEMcGill In Pharmaceutical processing there's steam, and *sterile steam*. The two are not synonymous. You may have a processing system that is sanitized, generally free of microbial contamination and expected not to encourage growth to a reasonable limit. Things like shampoo, and lotion are made under sanitary conditions. Food is processed under a sanitary standard also. However, take that steam up to 130C and filter at .2 micron to remove solids and now you have *Sterile Steam*. This is generally assumed to be statistically free of pathogens, although there's a large and ugly formula with exponents to predict just how free something is. You can actually filter something to sterility also, and often this is the prefered method in pharmaceuticals. You may have a material that is heat sensitive, or not easily heat treated. You filter it through a 0.2 micron filter and it removes viruses, bacteria, and solid contaminants. So if your goal is to clean water, the easiest way is to filter it. This will take suspended contaminants out. If your goal is to sterilize it, you need to heat it to 130C for at least 23 minutes and for good measure filter it (0.2 micron)before you heat it. Purifying it is a different matter because different chemistry takes different steps. Things like RO and Ionic bed treatment will do most of it. But "pure" is a mater of specifying it also. There's a diffrence between 99.9% pure and 99.999%.
95 MadScienceDreams To be clear, boiling water doesn't clean it: it kills many disease causing bacteria. Their dead bacteria bodies are still in the water. In fact, a large number of bacteria survive the heat just fine. Some "sporify" - basically go dormant until conditions don't suck as bad. Any other contaminants will still be in the water. Heck, you'll probably add some from whatever container you used to boil the water. There are some really fancy filters that can filter things down to the molecular scale. And of course, there is distilling (turning the water to vapor and then condensing it back to water). Neither of these processes will give you 100 percent pure water though.
1812 0 Madenmann If you boil water, you'll kill most pathogens living in it. Dissolved chemicals or particulates will remain, so if you boil brown water it'll still be brown. If whatever is making the water brown happens to be a toxin drinking the boiled water is still inadvisable. However, you can use boiling the water to clean it. Catch the steam, let it condense and have some clean water. We don't do that generally because it's a rather arduous process and it consumes a lot of energy.
10270 0 organiker Boiling water doesn't "clean" it. It does, however, kill certain harmful bacteria, which results in water that is safer to ingest.
1415 0 audiyon No, boiling water only kills living pathogens that can cause diseases. Anything dissolved or suspended in the water, eg. micro-plastics, salt, lead, bleach, will not be removed and will be left behind in a higher concentration after boiling. Water has to be **distilled** for it to be cleaned of other contaminants. See also: [Boiling water for potability](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling#For_making_water_potable) [Distillation](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distillation)
40 0 UEMcGill In Pharmaceutical processing there's steam, and *sterile steam*. The two are not synonymous. You may have a processing system that is sanitized, generally free of microbial contamination and expected not to encourage growth to a reasonable limit. Things like shampoo, and lotion are made under sanitary conditions. Food is processed under a sanitary standard also. However, take that steam up to 130C and filter at .2 micron to remove solids and now you have *Sterile Steam*. This is generally assumed to be statistically free of pathogens, although there's a large and ugly formula with exponents to predict just how free something is. You can actually filter something to sterility also, and often this is the prefered method in pharmaceuticals. You may have a material that is heat sensitive, or not easily heat treated. You filter it through a 0.2 micron filter and it removes viruses, bacteria, and solid contaminants. So if your goal is to clean water, the easiest way is to filter it. This will take suspended contaminants out. If your goal is to sterilize it, you need to heat it to 130C for at least 23 minutes and for good measure filter it (0.2 micron)before you heat it. Purifying it is a different matter because different chemistry takes different steps. Things like RO and Ionic bed treatment will do most of it. But "pure" is a mater of specifying it also. There's a diffrence between 99.9% pure and 99.999%.
94 0 MadScienceDreams To be clear, boiling water doesn't clean it: it kills many disease causing bacteria. Their dead bacteria bodies are still in the water. In fact, a large number of bacteria survive the heat just fine. Some "sporify" - basically go dormant until conditions don't suck as bad. Any other contaminants will still be in the water. Heck, you'll probably add some from whatever container you used to boil the water. There are some really fancy filters that can filter things down to the molecular scale. And of course, there is distilling (turning the water to vapor and then condensing it back to water). Neither of these processes will give you 100 percent pure water though.