Score
Title
285
AskScience Panel of Scientists XVII
961
AskScience AMA Series: European Southern Observatory announcement concerning groundbreaking observations.
1190
Do hydrogen isotopes affect chemical structure of complex hydrocarbons?
977
How far can a big passenger aircraft (for instance an Airbus A340) glide after catastrophic engin failure?
116
What is happening when a chip goes stale?
82
What is happening when a computer generates a random number? Are all RNG programs created equally? What makes an RNG better or worse?
105
Is there a difference in suicide rates between people who have already had children and those who haven't?
3
How is Mills's constant calculated? How does it relate to the Riemann hypothesis? Why don't we know if it's rational?
20
Why do electrons have a constant mass?
274
Why don’t we use salt water for toilet water? Wouldn’t it save millions of gallons of freshwater?
3
How do we calculate the exhaust speed of ions in a Hall-effect thruster ?
54
If you drop something on a solid, does it ripple like a liquid would except much less noticeably?
2
Are the social behaviors we label under 'group dynamics' universal? In other words, do the subconscious behaviors of a group change between cultures/ethnic lines, or are we all the same in this fundamental respect?
4793
How do audio books, printed books, and videos differ in terms of how our brains retain and process the information?
3
How can we prove that earth is rotating?
11
Why do some trees leaves turn red some yellow and some orange and if a tree is red this year then is it always red or can it be yellow next year?
63
Can there be anything higher than a pH of 14 or lower than a pH of 0?
15
Why are sloths so slow?
4
Why is Ruthenium's electron configuration [Kr] 5s1 4d7?
16
Will sterilisation with gamma rays not make the product radioactive or destroy the product?
6
Human fetal development: When does the uterus start to form?
13
The impact of canals in a city?
1
Why does absence of blood flow cause cell death?
2
Is the low dosage of cosmic background radiation we are constatly exposed to a driver of evolution?
16
How do tree rings form?
11
Can deaf people get tinnitus?
12
Do you burn more calories when cold compared to when you are warm when doing the same activity?
9
Does a flashing LED light use less electricity than a steady light? Would a light on a 1/2 second on/off flash use half the electricity?
1
What factors lead to the Wisconsin glaciation?
7
How do the switching mechanisms in transistors work, and how are they triggered?
9
Concerning the photoelectric effect, if an electron's energy is nearly proportional to the frequency of the incident photons, why don't solar panels work on cloudy days? Doesn't UV light, which is higher energy than visible and infrared, pass through clouds?
0
Why is it that, when traveling in space, the heavier the food is, the more expensive it is to transport? Who pays money to who?
3
Was bacon used as a treatment for dermatobia hominis?
6278
Do you use muscles to open or close your eyes?
8
I know a catalyst works by lowering the activation energy but how does it do that?
2
Risk Factors vs Indicators for Disease - What's the difference?
8
How do we know how much a planet weights/the mass of the planet, without knowing exactly what it is made of?
14
My physics tutor said that we are now able to change the wavelength of an already emitted laser beam. How is this possible?
1
Given low enough temperature and high enough pressure, is everything able to freeze?
3
Why does NaCl always has a Crystal structure when solid ?
3
How does a mirror reflect light?
1
Do light waves affect how sound waves travel or vice versa?
16 thagr8gonzo I assume you're talking about learning a second language after you've already established a dominant first language, referred to as an L1. Research by [Kroll & Stewart, 1994](http://www.pitt.edu/~perfetti/PDF/Kroll%20&%20Stewart.pdf) indicates that the underlying concept for all versions of a given word is stored as a unit, and that retrieval of that particular conceptual unit facilitates word memory in all the languages known by an individual. This word memory is usually funneled through a person's L1. In other words, finding a word in a second, third, etc. language often occurs through accessing the specific word for a concept in a person's L1 then translating it to the other language, even if this process isn't done through conscious effort. A similar thing happens with grammar: a person with an L1 will usually relate grammar in other languages to the corollary grammatical structures in the L1. Noam Chomsky's early work argues for a universal grammar, which asserts that humans possess brain functions specifically adapted for use in language, and that underlie all languages. His theory leans toward the "additive" linguistic model proposed in your question. However, new languages do require the brain to develop new neuronal pathways associated with that language. In that sense, the second language is indeed "separate" because it requires different neuronal pathways than those used for the L1 to be functional. More simply, the answer to your question is both. A lot of the semantics (i.e. word meanings) and grammar for each language are stored separately, but they're constantly interacting, too. The new language is not held in some disassociated network: it interacts with the other languages you know all the time. Nonetheless, it does require a "different" set of pathways to function. It might help to think of the two languages as parallel highways (they basically go to the same places) that have a lot of interchanges between them. As far as the question from /u/Sir_Spaniard is concerned: I'm not aware of any studies like you're looking for and I'm too lazy to research it right now, but I can tell you that personality is largely governed by the frontal cortex of the brain. Maybe that helps you research it yourself. Also, it's a serious area of contention in the linguistic community whether there actually are personality changes that can be attributed to the use of different languages.
3 Sir_Spaniard Add on question: I've come to understand that we can formulate different personalities when we speak different languages, what parts of the brain are responsible for this and have there been any studies (for example, looking at different parts of the brain via an MRI while the person jumps around through different conversations in different languages)
2 [deleted] [removed]
15 0 thagr8gonzo I assume you're talking about learning a second language after you've already established a dominant first language, referred to as an L1. Research by [Kroll & Stewart, 1994](http://www.pitt.edu/~perfetti/PDF/Kroll%20&%20Stewart.pdf) indicates that the underlying concept for all versions of a given word is stored as a unit, and that retrieval of that particular conceptual unit facilitates word memory in all the languages known by an individual. This word memory is usually funneled through a person's L1. In other words, finding a word in a second, third, etc. language often occurs through accessing the specific word for a concept in a person's L1 then translating it to the other language, even if this process isn't done through conscious effort. A similar thing happens with grammar: a person with an L1 will usually relate grammar in other languages to the corollary grammatical structures in the L1. Noam Chomsky's early work argues for a universal grammar, which asserts that humans possess brain functions specifically adapted for use in language, and that underlie all languages. His theory leans toward the "additive" linguistic model proposed in your question. However, new languages do require the brain to develop new neuronal pathways associated with that language. In that sense, the second language is indeed "separate" because it requires different neuronal pathways than those used for the L1 to be functional. More simply, the answer to your question is both. A lot of the semantics (i.e. word meanings) and grammar for each language are stored separately, but they're constantly interacting, too. The new language is not held in some disassociated network: it interacts with the other languages you know all the time. Nonetheless, it does require a "different" set of pathways to function. It might help to think of the two languages as parallel highways (they basically go to the same places) that have a lot of interchanges between them. As far as the question from /u/Sir_Spaniard is concerned: I'm not aware of any studies like you're looking for and I'm too lazy to research it right now, but I can tell you that personality is largely governed by the frontal cortex of the brain. Maybe that helps you research it yourself. Also, it's a serious area of contention in the linguistic community whether there actually are personality changes that can be attributed to the use of different languages.
3 0 Sir_Spaniard Add on question: I've come to understand that we can formulate different personalities when we speak different languages, what parts of the brain are responsible for this and have there been any studies (for example, looking at different parts of the brain via an MRI while the person jumps around through different conversations in different languages)
2 0 [deleted] [removed]