Score
Title
75
AskScience Panel of Scientists XVIII
247
AskScience AMA Series: "I am Rhett Allain, physicist and technical consultant on Mythbusters and MacGyver. Ask me about the physics of pretty much anything!
4194
Is body chemistry affected by sound, in the same way that melatonin production is affected by light?
4081
Is there any organism that has more than one brain?
35
How do astronomers know the "red shift" is coming from the Doppler effect and not from static stars producing light at a red wavelength?
14
How does a flu vaccine lessen symptoms when you catch a flu variant that isn’t one of the variants in that seasons vaccination?
34
Do NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, reduce specific areas of inflammation or do they reduce inflammation overall?
3414
How much radiation does a luggage scanner deliver vs say medical x-ray?
40
How do we know the temperature of the centre of the sun?
25
Would Koko, the sign-language speaking gorilla, have been able to translate what a different, non-signing gorilla was saying?
9
[chemistry][nuclear physics] if the island of stability does exist, do we have any way of estimating what the behavior/properties of those elements will be like?
33
How do they reproduce seedless fruits/vegetables ?
14
Is it possible for an object to be travelling so fast it would bounce off the atmosphere?
14
Most antibacterial sprays kill 99.9% of germs. What's the 0.1% of bacteria consist of?
12
Is Crystallized Bismuth the Only Instance of Naturally Occurring Right Angles?
617
Can someone explain the environmental impact of electric car batteries?
9
How is the CMB used to calculate the Hubble constant?
9
Would it be possible for a planet's day to be longer than its year?
28155
Do heavily forested regions of the world like the eastern United States experience a noticeable difference in oxygen levels/air quality during the winter months when the trees lose all of their leaves?
4
If we reversed all charges would the world be the same?
4
When a banana ripens, does it gain calories?
2
How does the sky look like on Mars? How bright is the Sun comparing it to the view from Earth?
0
How do compilers adapt to different hardware?
7
How would quantum computing break modern cryptography?
16
Does breast size affect risk of breast cancer?
3
Do snakes have saliva glands?
39
Can a virus go extinct?
13
How is Titan able to have an atmosphere pressure similar to Earth when it's gravity is so much lower than Earth's?
53
How have cancer treatments actually improved?
22
Does knowing multiple languages actually alter your brain structure? If so, how?
39
Would it be theoretically possible to trap light with a strong enough set of magnets/electromagnets?
22
Why do we use four or more rotors on drones, but only maximum two on regular helicopters? Why are we not making full size quadrocopters?
4
Is the color of an animal's covering (skin, furr, feathers, etc) determined by the amount of colors they can see?
22
Why don't they use jet engines for the first stage of rockets?
1
Chemically speaking, what makes something sweet? What makes some sweeteners spike one's blood sugar, while others don't?
12
Is it possible to make concrete a liquid again from a solid?
380
If I were to release oxygen into the vacuum of space where would it go?
8
Are organisms trapped in amber mineralized fossils, the original tissue or a combination of both?
5
Is it possible to have similar mass planets in a stable mutual orbit?
8
What physical part of a tree absorbs Co2?
8
Does soapy water flow through pipes more quickly than plain water?
8
Why are there so many types of cables?
15 Critical_Liz In the US and the industrialized world it's manageable, expensive but manageable. Medication can reduce the viral load to almost nothing, this makes it possible for patients to lead normal lives, even having children without passing the virus on. They still have to take precautions as does anyone with a compromised immune system. (yet another reason why anti vaxxers are dangerous) In less developed countries it is a death sentence. It's been awhile since I've read up on it but it was particularly bad in Africa. Uganda, like 20 years ago, was able to stem transmission by taking a proactive stance on safe sex, much like the US in the 90s.
5 baloo_the_bear It used to be that Infectious Disease (as a specialty) was '*travel medicine*'. Then came HIV/AIDS, and it changed the landscape of medicine forever. AIDS, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is the end result of infection with HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. AIDS can be diagnosed when certain [criteria](https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/statistics/surveillance/terms.html) are met or a person suffers any [AIDS defining illness](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIDS-defining_clinical_condition). These opportunistic organisms are ubiquitous, so the only defense we have from them is a constant battle fought by our immune system. Patients who meet certain CD4 count criteria (a measure of a type of cell of the immune system) are given prophylactic antibiotics until their CD4 counts respond to therapy. HIV positive people now have essentially a normal life expectancy. The caveat to that is that they need to be appropriately treated. Uncontrolled HIV will lead to AIDS and can cause premature death from opportunistic infections. There are methods of reducing risk of transmission. Post-exposure prophylaxis and even pre-exposure prophylaxis exist for couples where one partner is positive and the other one is not. Maternal-to-fetal transmission is still possible, and HIV infection is one of the [contraindications to breastfeeding](http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/115/2/496). However, suitable alternatives to breastfeeding are not always available in developing countries, which has led to increased transmission rates in some areas of the world. Additionally, HIV positive people are also often co-infected with Hepatitis C or B, so looking at overall mortality introduces confounders. The consequences of contracting HIV are still life-altering. But modern medicine has allowed us to manage it. It is by no means as bad as it was even 10 or 20 years ago.
2 StardustSapien There was a recent update on the so-called "Berlin patient", a guy by the name of Timothy Brown who was [functionally cured](http://www.newsweek.com/hiv-cure-berlin-patients-incredible-recovery-now-one-step-closer-replication-707469) of AIDS after recieving a bone marrow transplant. We still haven't gotten to the point where an effective treatment can be publicly deployed. But scientists are making progress in understanding how his particular case can be replicated.
16 0 Critical_Liz In the US and the industrialized world it's manageable, expensive but manageable. Medication can reduce the viral load to almost nothing, this makes it possible for patients to lead normal lives, even having children without passing the virus on. They still have to take precautions as does anyone with a compromised immune system. (yet another reason why anti vaxxers are dangerous) In less developed countries it is a death sentence. It's been awhile since I've read up on it but it was particularly bad in Africa. Uganda, like 20 years ago, was able to stem transmission by taking a proactive stance on safe sex, much like the US in the 90s.
6 0 baloo_the_bear It used to be that Infectious Disease (as a specialty) was '*travel medicine*'. Then came HIV/AIDS, and it changed the landscape of medicine forever. AIDS, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is the end result of infection with HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. AIDS can be diagnosed when certain [criteria](https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/statistics/surveillance/terms.html) are met or a person suffers any [AIDS defining illness](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AIDS-defining_clinical_condition). These opportunistic organisms are ubiquitous, so the only defense we have from them is a constant battle fought by our immune system. Patients who meet certain CD4 count criteria (a measure of a type of cell of the immune system) are given prophylactic antibiotics until their CD4 counts respond to therapy. HIV positive people now have essentially a normal life expectancy. The caveat to that is that they need to be appropriately treated. Uncontrolled HIV will lead to AIDS and can cause premature death from opportunistic infections. There are methods of reducing risk of transmission. Post-exposure prophylaxis and even pre-exposure prophylaxis exist for couples where one partner is positive and the other one is not. Maternal-to-fetal transmission is still possible, and HIV infection is one of the [contraindications to breastfeeding](http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/115/2/496). However, suitable alternatives to breastfeeding are not always available in developing countries, which has led to increased transmission rates in some areas of the world. Additionally, HIV positive people are also often co-infected with Hepatitis C or B, so looking at overall mortality introduces confounders. The consequences of contracting HIV are still life-altering. But modern medicine has allowed us to manage it. It is by no means as bad as it was even 10 or 20 years ago.
2 0 StardustSapien There was a recent update on the so-called "Berlin patient", a guy by the name of Timothy Brown who was [functionally cured](http://www.newsweek.com/hiv-cure-berlin-patients-incredible-recovery-now-one-step-closer-replication-707469) of AIDS after recieving a bone marrow transplant. We still haven't gotten to the point where an effective treatment can be publicly deployed. But scientists are making progress in understanding how his particular case can be replicated.