Score
Title
435
AskScience Panel of Scientists XVII
3110
Is there a limit on how long a power cord can be?
1398
I know it takes two weeks for the flu vaccine to be fully effective. I assume effectiveness is zero right before the vaccine is administered, and maximum after two weeks. But is there a graph that shows how effectiveness changes in time?
8651
Why is the Congo River so deep?
17
Why the Antarctic ice cap stays in one place and does not drift freely like an iceberg?
42
Why is the separation constant for the radial equation of the Hydrogen atom in the form of L(L+1)?
11
Why can some viruses (smallpox, polio) be virtually eradicated while others cannot (HIV, influenza)?
3
How does a coax splitter work?
20
If the capacity of a battery charging another battery drops below that of the receiving battery, will it stop transferring electricity since the electrons will no longer prefer to leave the lower energy "state" of the drained battery?
3
Is there a link between a metal being conductive from an electric standpoint and it being magnetic? If so, what is the cause?
13
If our bodies are conductive, can holding a battery between two fingers deplete it completely?
2
What can stop and/or destroy a black hole?
40
How/why are so many mathematical proofs and theorems contingent on the Riemann hypothesis being true?
7438
Are there any predators that hunt for sport rather than for food?
6
Are there any ant species that don’t live in colonies?
24
Do they update the voyager software?
2
How did the Russian Woodpecker receiver work?
2
What is meant by the heat death of the universe?
19
Does language affect learning and studying?
2
If the strength of an acid is based on concentration, why are acids like Sulfuric Acid always considered so dangerous compared to others?
23
When water does down the drain, why does it always go down the drain in a form of whirlpool.?
12
From what I have learnt so far, refrigerators use chlorofluorocarbons for cooling. Do these chlorofluorocarbons run out after some time? If yes how are they replenished?
0
Microwave Ovens and Wi-Fi Signals Operate at The Same Frequency (2.4GHz). What Makes Microwave Ovens More Dangerous?
20
What makes things transparent?
16
What allows certain cars and airplanes to have their own Wifi?
31
What causes the thick mist/fog that I frequently see coming off of mountains in my area?
9
What exactly happens to a person's behavior after a lobotomy?
8
How Bayes rule was used to help with aiming cannons?
6
Is there a limit to the energy density of batteries?
3
Is a Colliod a state of matter?
0
What kind of waves on the Electromagnetic Spectrum do metal detectors use to isolate only metal and no other materials?
21
Many poisonous and venomous vertebrates get their toxins from toxic arthropods that form part of their diets. Why can't they just form the toxins themselves the same ways their prey do?
192
Why are hail storms so short?
6
How do particle accelerators such as the LHC detect particle collision products?
5
How do marine mammals keep their testes cool?
68
If aliens were to look at earth through a telescope from 65 million lightyears away, would they see dinosaurs?
13
Why does fire flicker?
27
What exactly is string theory and how does it work?
10732
What exactly does the cold virus do to me to make me so weak?
8
I understand conduction and radiation as modes of heat transfer, but convection confuses me. Why does fluid moving over an object remove heat from it as opposed to adding heat due to friction?
17
What happens to the brain as you fall asleep? Are certain proteins released to induce sleep? Is it seen as a voluntary or involuntary action?
226 LegalAss Nope. Brushing dislodges food in a manner that simply swishing mouthwash never could. Food stuck in the natural nooks and crannies of your teeth provides the perfect shelter, diet, and breeding ground for those bacteria
30 [deleted] [removed]
2 MadScienceDreams No matter how much you swish, you aren't gonna get everything. 3 things will be left behind: 1) live bacteria and sporified bacteria. Killing 99% of germs is fine, but they will grow back exponentially from their small numbers. 2) food particles, which help the bacteria grow back. 3) biofilms and plaque. Both allow more bacteria to survive the rinsing process, and the increased surface area allows faster bacterial growth and more places for food tho get trapped. On top of this, food'll get stuck in your gums, which will cause the gums to swell, which seals off the food and bacteria from the most ardent of brushing. So say hello to "the gym disease, gingivitis".
2 TLMoss No. Plaque bacteria form and live within a very effective protective system called a biofilm. Think of it like a protective little eco dome where something like Listerine will damage the outside but not those hungry bacteria living in the dome. Once a biofilm has formed, Listerine is close to useless. To deal with a biofilm, you need to get in and mechanically disrupt it i.e. with a toothbrush, floss or an interdental brush. Despite what you may have seen, mouthwashes at best will help slightly slow the formation of a biofilm, it is next to useless once it's formed.
2 Anovan No, because of a thing called biofilms. This is basically where the bacteria all band together and try to protect each other against anything that would try to remove them. Mechanical abrasion (ie brushing and flossing) interrupts the biofilm while swishing with mouthwash isn't able to.
226 0 LegalAss Nope. Brushing dislodges food in a manner that simply swishing mouthwash never could. Food stuck in the natural nooks and crannies of your teeth provides the perfect shelter, diet, and breeding ground for those bacteria
28 0 [deleted] [removed]
2 0 MadScienceDreams No matter how much you swish, you aren't gonna get everything. 3 things will be left behind: 1) live bacteria and sporified bacteria. Killing 99% of germs is fine, but they will grow back exponentially from their small numbers. 2) food particles, which help the bacteria grow back. 3) biofilms and plaque. Both allow more bacteria to survive the rinsing process, and the increased surface area allows faster bacterial growth and more places for food tho get trapped. On top of this, food'll get stuck in your gums, which will cause the gums to swell, which seals off the food and bacteria from the most ardent of brushing. So say hello to "the gym disease, gingivitis".
2 0 TLMoss No. Plaque bacteria form and live within a very effective protective system called a biofilm. Think of it like a protective little eco dome where something like Listerine will damage the outside but not those hungry bacteria living in the dome. Once a biofilm has formed, Listerine is close to useless. To deal with a biofilm, you need to get in and mechanically disrupt it i.e. with a toothbrush, floss or an interdental brush. Despite what you may have seen, mouthwashes at best will help slightly slow the formation of a biofilm, it is next to useless once it's formed.
2 0 Anovan No, because of a thing called biofilms. This is basically where the bacteria all band together and try to protect each other against anything that would try to remove them. Mechanical abrasion (ie brushing and flossing) interrupts the biofilm while swishing with mouthwash isn't able to.