Score
Title
266
AskScience Panel of Scientists XVIII
634
AskScience AMA Series: IAmA restoration ecologist focused on restoring oysters to the NY Harbor in New York City. AMA!
9367
How does a master key work?
60
How is it so that several (all?) mammals grow and lose a set of "baby teeth" before growing their final dentition? Why stop at two sets when other vertebrates such as sharks regenerate their teeth constantly?
22
How do our eyes avoid being commonly infected through things like rubbing our eyes or the pollutants in the air?
22
If placed in a controlled environment, do trees that normally undergo seasonal leaf Abcission stop losing their leaves?
5522
How does sunscreen stop you from getting burnt?
6
Are women born with all their eggs?
16
Do nocturnal animals prefer sleeping conditions that are dimly lit or bright in contrast to humans which prefer dark conditions?
9
[Medicine] What leads a body to reject or accept donated organs?
33
If the human body has evolved over millions of years to swell up in response to an injury, why are we instructed to apply ice to prevent our evolutionary swelling response?
12
How do phones keep cool with small heatsinks and no fans?
7
How can we tell if someone we can’t see is shouting from far away or whispering close to us?
7
Why are shadows casted from objects more crisp depending on how far the object is from the ground?
12
How does a train engine, pulling miles of cars and many tons of load, get enough traction to actually move everything?
3
Would objects orbiting Earth, such as space debris, satellites, the ISS, be hot or cold to the touch?
18
Studies have shown that small movements in the throat occur during an internal dialogue--does that happen when music plays in your head, too?
5
What is causing this orbiting water droplet in my tea kettle?
2
How is hybrid fruit produced?
5
Why is cold weather usually synonymous with pneumonia infections?
6
Are there more cases of depression in modern times than in history?
65
Why does sunburnt skin feel hot to the touch?
10
Air molecules travel at 1000 mph. Can we harness that kinetic energy?
0
Are there any videos from NASA or other space agency where they do tests in the vacuum of space? Such as a plant or mice or anything is taken outside of the space shuttle/station
27
When you shake up a carbonated drink, where does the pressure go once it’s ‘settled’?
1
How is the mute/play next functionality on audio-jack earbuds implemented?
1
How does atmospheric scintillation work in detail?
10
In my chemistry class yesterday we learned about the pathlength of gas molecules in a gas at STP. What is the pathlength of interstellar hydrogen? What about the intergalactic medium?
6
Why is space and space travel illustrated, for the most part, on a horizontal line? Can't we space travel "upwards" or "downwards" and where would that eventually lead?
1
Can the exact solution of a system of non-linear equations be determined algebraically?
8
Is there any scientific evidence that dinosaurs roared (as seen in movies)?
3
Why don't we normally hear sounds when we move our heads?
0
Can rare astronomical phenomena such as solar eclipses or supernovas disrupt biological cycles of living organisms?
1
Angles allow you translate between X, Y and Z - is there an equivalent between time and the spatial dimensions?
15
How were the subduction zones discovered and observed?
22
What factors affect the orbit of our sun around the galaxy?
2
Which potassium compounds are present in lye water? If it's not KOH then how is it made from the ash?
6
Do mental illnesses run in families? Will they be the same mental illness or can they vary between each offspring?
5
Does the genetic composition of a woman's eggs change over her lifespan?
21
Why do images on a monitor become negtive when viewed from a certain angle?
14
How far in advance can we predict a major tectonic event?
2888
How are drugs like antidepressants (who’s effects aren’t immediately apparent) developed?
13134 [deleted] [removed]
1383 babinatable Specifically, the cause of the crummy feeling is due to your innate immune system cells, like macrophages, detecting foreign materials and releasing cytokines to call attention from more and more immune cells (this starts the inflammation response). Some types of cytokines are specifically responsible for triggering the brain to make you sleepy, sore, and have a fever. Here's a great little video with a little more detail: https://youtu.be/gVdY9KXF_Sg
1412 [deleted] [removed]
160 Kegnaught The fatigue is likely caused by fever. In response to an infection with a cold-causing virus, your immune cells begin to secrete cytokines that cause both localized inflammation and a full-fledged immune response from the rest of the body. Chemokines like Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 are considered major endogenous (meaning they are produced by your own body) pyrogens (molecules that cause fever). In addition, other endogenous molecules are also produced that aid in inducing a fever. IL-1 and IL-6 can both activate the [arachidonic acid pathway](http://www.cvphysiology.com/Blood%20Flow/BF013), which ends in the synthesis of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 is a major regulator of the febrile response and acts on the hypothalamus and other areas of the brain, which induces shivering to create heat, constriction of blood vessels to prevent heat loss, and can also cause the release of adrenaline. The virus itself can cause tissue damage, which further exacerbates inflammation in the area of the infection. Not all viruses that cause colds replicate through the same mechanism: some are lytic and others are lysogenic. Lytic viruses like rhinoviruses rupture cells once the infected cell reaches its burst size. The insides of the cell can trigger inflammatory signals from neighboring cells as well, further exacerbating the immune response. Lysogenic viruses such as coronaviruses tend to bud or undergo exocytosis from cells, and the immune response to these is somewhat dampened by the lack of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that would trigger inflammation from nearby cells. Unfortunately, from what I can find it's not totally clear what it is about fever or inflammation that causes lethargy, though I would speculate it likely has to do with the modulation of the [autonomic nervous system](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomic_nervous_system) by prostaglandins.
13127 0 [deleted] [removed]
1379 0 babinatable Specifically, the cause of the crummy feeling is due to your innate immune system cells, like macrophages, detecting foreign materials and releasing cytokines to call attention from more and more immune cells (this starts the inflammation response). Some types of cytokines are specifically responsible for triggering the brain to make you sleepy, sore, and have a fever. Here's a great little video with a little more detail: https://youtu.be/gVdY9KXF_Sg
1420 0 [deleted] [removed]
159 0 Kegnaught The fatigue is likely caused by fever. In response to an infection with a cold-causing virus, your immune cells begin to secrete cytokines that cause both localized inflammation and a full-fledged immune response from the rest of the body. Chemokines like Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 are considered major endogenous (meaning they are produced by your own body) pyrogens (molecules that cause fever). In addition, other endogenous molecules are also produced that aid in inducing a fever. IL-1 and IL-6 can both activate the [arachidonic acid pathway](http://www.cvphysiology.com/Blood%20Flow/BF013), which ends in the synthesis of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 is a major regulator of the febrile response and acts on the hypothalamus and other areas of the brain, which induces shivering to create heat, constriction of blood vessels to prevent heat loss, and can also cause the release of adrenaline. The virus itself can cause tissue damage, which further exacerbates inflammation in the area of the infection. Not all viruses that cause colds replicate through the same mechanism: some are lytic and others are lysogenic. Lytic viruses like rhinoviruses rupture cells once the infected cell reaches its burst size. The insides of the cell can trigger inflammatory signals from neighboring cells as well, further exacerbating the immune response. Lysogenic viruses such as coronaviruses tend to bud or undergo exocytosis from cells, and the immune response to these is somewhat dampened by the lack of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that would trigger inflammation from nearby cells. Unfortunately, from what I can find it's not totally clear what it is about fever or inflammation that causes lethargy, though I would speculate it likely has to do with the modulation of the [autonomic nervous system](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomic_nervous_system) by prostaglandins.