Score
Title
266
AskScience Panel of Scientists XVIII
634
AskScience AMA Series: IAmA restoration ecologist focused on restoring oysters to the NY Harbor in New York City. AMA!
9367
How does a master key work?
60
How is it so that several (all?) mammals grow and lose a set of "baby teeth" before growing their final dentition? Why stop at two sets when other vertebrates such as sharks regenerate their teeth constantly?
22
How do our eyes avoid being commonly infected through things like rubbing our eyes or the pollutants in the air?
22
If placed in a controlled environment, do trees that normally undergo seasonal leaf Abcission stop losing their leaves?
5522
How does sunscreen stop you from getting burnt?
6
Are women born with all their eggs?
16
Do nocturnal animals prefer sleeping conditions that are dimly lit or bright in contrast to humans which prefer dark conditions?
9
[Medicine] What leads a body to reject or accept donated organs?
33
If the human body has evolved over millions of years to swell up in response to an injury, why are we instructed to apply ice to prevent our evolutionary swelling response?
12
How do phones keep cool with small heatsinks and no fans?
7
How can we tell if someone we can’t see is shouting from far away or whispering close to us?
7
Why are shadows casted from objects more crisp depending on how far the object is from the ground?
12
How does a train engine, pulling miles of cars and many tons of load, get enough traction to actually move everything?
3
Would objects orbiting Earth, such as space debris, satellites, the ISS, be hot or cold to the touch?
18
Studies have shown that small movements in the throat occur during an internal dialogue--does that happen when music plays in your head, too?
5
What is causing this orbiting water droplet in my tea kettle?
2
How is hybrid fruit produced?
5
Why is cold weather usually synonymous with pneumonia infections?
6
Are there more cases of depression in modern times than in history?
65
Why does sunburnt skin feel hot to the touch?
10
Air molecules travel at 1000 mph. Can we harness that kinetic energy?
0
Are there any videos from NASA or other space agency where they do tests in the vacuum of space? Such as a plant or mice or anything is taken outside of the space shuttle/station
27
When you shake up a carbonated drink, where does the pressure go once it’s ‘settled’?
1
How is the mute/play next functionality on audio-jack earbuds implemented?
1
How does atmospheric scintillation work in detail?
10
In my chemistry class yesterday we learned about the pathlength of gas molecules in a gas at STP. What is the pathlength of interstellar hydrogen? What about the intergalactic medium?
6
Why is space and space travel illustrated, for the most part, on a horizontal line? Can't we space travel "upwards" or "downwards" and where would that eventually lead?
1
Can the exact solution of a system of non-linear equations be determined algebraically?
8
Is there any scientific evidence that dinosaurs roared (as seen in movies)?
3
Why don't we normally hear sounds when we move our heads?
0
Can rare astronomical phenomena such as solar eclipses or supernovas disrupt biological cycles of living organisms?
1
Angles allow you translate between X, Y and Z - is there an equivalent between time and the spatial dimensions?
15
How were the subduction zones discovered and observed?
22
What factors affect the orbit of our sun around the galaxy?
2
Which potassium compounds are present in lye water? If it's not KOH then how is it made from the ash?
6
Do mental illnesses run in families? Will they be the same mental illness or can they vary between each offspring?
5
Does the genetic composition of a woman's eggs change over her lifespan?
21
Why do images on a monitor become negtive when viewed from a certain angle?
14
How far in advance can we predict a major tectonic event?
2888
How are drugs like antidepressants (who’s effects aren’t immediately apparent) developed?
1 RobusEtCeleritas Please remember that you should be able to provide reputable sources for your comments, and they should not contain personal anecdotes about your pets, or other animal behaviors you may have personally observed.
3472 robotmirrornine Radiolab had a podcast episode about this (“zoos”). Big cat predators in zoos are well fed, but they are bored and show low brain activity while in captivity. A squirrel got into a cage and a panther spent hours chasing it and hunting it - like housecats, their brains are set up to be stimulated by hunting and chasing, even if full. In some zoos in China, they have experimented with giving lions live calves to chase and eat. And it’s popular to have tourists buy a live chicken in the zoo to send down a tube chute so the big cats can chase and eat it. Edit: panther
4756 Sweet_Taurus0728 House Cats. Seriously. The common, everyday, run-of-the-mill House Cat. They don't kill things because they're hungry, they do it because it's fun. They're more vicious than any Big Cat on Earth. The *only* reason they're not considered as *dangerous*, is because they're so small. ["*The estimated kill rates are two to four times higher than mortality figures previously bandied about, and position the domestic cat as one of the single greatest human-linked threats to wildlife in the nation. More birds and mammals die at the mouths of cats, the report said, than from automobile strikes, pesticides and poisons, collisions with skyscrapers and windmills and other so-called anthropogenic causes.*"](https://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/01/30/science/that-cuddly-kitty-of-yours-is-a-killer.html?referer=https://www.google.com/)
6160 [deleted] [removed]
1253 xKOROSIVEx There are documented cases of mountain lions, wolves, and tigers killing and not eating what they’ve killed. Whether for sport or because their kill drive “stayed on” in relatively close proximity to prey animals after the first kill is unknown.
423 YourFriendlySpidy Foxes will go on killing sprees in chicken coops but only take one or two. Leopards will apparently do the same in ostrich farms. Not sure if it counts as sport hunting since there's no evidence it's premeditated rather than just a blood frenzy
226 TychaBrahe I know that you asked specifically about animals hunting for sport, but I thought you might be interested in another non-food hunting behavior. Lions prey on elephant calves, and elephants understand that. Therefore, [elephants will carry out unprovoked (and provoked) attacks on lion cubs](https://books.google.com/books?id=7ann2dYn9iYC&pg=PA189&lpg=PA189&dq=elephants+kill+lion+cubs&source=bl&ots=l08LB05frh&sig=StRmIAaXVT7FUnXG6pda6ejz2n0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi27b-LloDYAhUOON8KHcndDGI4ChDoATAGegQIARAB#v=onepage&q=elephants%20kill%20lion%20cubs&f=false). Presumably they understand that killing the cubs reduces future adults which will prey on their own young.
901 [deleted] [removed]
338 Bobdog1994 Snakehead! Species of fish indigenous to Asia and parts of Africa. Known to be one of the most aggressive fish species alive today due to it attacking and killing anything that comes close to it, for literally no reason. There is a national conversation going on about these fish because they've been introduced into freshwater in the extreme eastern United States, and are taking over since there's no predatory fish that match them, and they can lay well over 20000 eggs in one year. They've been spotted in Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, and in parts of some major rivers. EDIT: forgot to mention they CAN BREATHE AIR and live out off water for days at a time. There's a great documentary from nat Geo about them.
83 Throwawayfabric247 If you define hunt as to pursue and not to kill. I believe orcas would be the best definition of hunting for sport. They try techniques to learn how to utilize new tactics. They play with prey and learn from the actions. This hunting for sport or to gain. I'm on mobile so I can only copy one link at a time. https://youtu.be/oxDZW4k8tCY
321 DemenicHand there is a famous story of a tiger that tracked down a human hunter that had taken one of his kills and murdered the guy in his cabin. Lay in wait and murdered him. Elephants too have displayed vicious behavior with immature males forming packs and terrorizing small animals in nature perserves. eventually large adult males were brought in and the behavior stopped
127 fotwfishfeet Chimpanzees are thought to hunt for sport. Some groups of chimps hunt red colobus monkeys and it was once thought that they hunted when their usual sources of food were sparse, but they actually hunted more when they had a steady supply of food (because going on a hunt is a labor intensive activity, so they need plenty of food and time before they can even think about going hunting). One study concluded that chimpanzees share meat after hunting to form strong alliances with other chimps. The study I got this info from is titled "Why do chimpanzees hunt and share meat?" by John Mitani and David Watts.
1 0 RobusEtCeleritas Please remember that you should be able to provide reputable sources for your comments, and they should not contain personal anecdotes about your pets, or other animal behaviors you may have personally observed.
3470 0 robotmirrornine Radiolab had a podcast episode about this (“zoos”). Big cat predators in zoos are well fed, but they are bored and show low brain activity while in captivity. A squirrel got into a cage and a panther spent hours chasing it and hunting it - like housecats, their brains are set up to be stimulated by hunting and chasing, even if full. In some zoos in China, they have experimented with giving lions live calves to chase and eat. And it’s popular to have tourists buy a live chicken in the zoo to send down a tube chute so the big cats can chase and eat it. Edit: panther
4756 0 Sweet_Taurus0728 House Cats. Seriously. The common, everyday, run-of-the-mill House Cat. They don't kill things because they're hungry, they do it because it's fun. They're more vicious than any Big Cat on Earth. The *only* reason they're not considered as *dangerous*, is because they're so small. ["*The estimated kill rates are two to four times higher than mortality figures previously bandied about, and position the domestic cat as one of the single greatest human-linked threats to wildlife in the nation. More birds and mammals die at the mouths of cats, the report said, than from automobile strikes, pesticides and poisons, collisions with skyscrapers and windmills and other so-called anthropogenic causes.*"](https://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/01/30/science/that-cuddly-kitty-of-yours-is-a-killer.html?referer=https://www.google.com/)
6159 0 [deleted] [removed]
1260 0 xKOROSIVEx There are documented cases of mountain lions, wolves, and tigers killing and not eating what they’ve killed. Whether for sport or because their kill drive “stayed on” in relatively close proximity to prey animals after the first kill is unknown.
417 0 YourFriendlySpidy Foxes will go on killing sprees in chicken coops but only take one or two. Leopards will apparently do the same in ostrich farms. Not sure if it counts as sport hunting since there's no evidence it's premeditated rather than just a blood frenzy
227 0 TychaBrahe I know that you asked specifically about animals hunting for sport, but I thought you might be interested in another non-food hunting behavior. Lions prey on elephant calves, and elephants understand that. Therefore, [elephants will carry out unprovoked (and provoked) attacks on lion cubs](https://books.google.com/books?id=7ann2dYn9iYC&pg=PA189&lpg=PA189&dq=elephants+kill+lion+cubs&source=bl&ots=l08LB05frh&sig=StRmIAaXVT7FUnXG6pda6ejz2n0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi27b-LloDYAhUOON8KHcndDGI4ChDoATAGegQIARAB#v=onepage&q=elephants%20kill%20lion%20cubs&f=false). Presumably they understand that killing the cubs reduces future adults which will prey on their own young.
907 0 [deleted] [removed]
340 0 Bobdog1994 Snakehead! Species of fish indigenous to Asia and parts of Africa. Known to be one of the most aggressive fish species alive today due to it attacking and killing anything that comes close to it, for literally no reason. There is a national conversation going on about these fish because they've been introduced into freshwater in the extreme eastern United States, and are taking over since there's no predatory fish that match them, and they can lay well over 20000 eggs in one year. They've been spotted in Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, and in parts of some major rivers. EDIT: forgot to mention they CAN BREATHE AIR and live out off water for days at a time. There's a great documentary from nat Geo about them.
85 0 Throwawayfabric247 If you define hunt as to pursue and not to kill. I believe orcas would be the best definition of hunting for sport. They try techniques to learn how to utilize new tactics. They play with prey and learn from the actions. This hunting for sport or to gain. I'm on mobile so I can only copy one link at a time. https://youtu.be/oxDZW4k8tCY
323 0 DemenicHand there is a famous story of a tiger that tracked down a human hunter that had taken one of his kills and murdered the guy in his cabin. Lay in wait and murdered him. Elephants too have displayed vicious behavior with immature males forming packs and terrorizing small animals in nature perserves. eventually large adult males were brought in and the behavior stopped
128 0 fotwfishfeet Chimpanzees are thought to hunt for sport. Some groups of chimps hunt red colobus monkeys and it was once thought that they hunted when their usual sources of food were sparse, but they actually hunted more when they had a steady supply of food (because going on a hunt is a labor intensive activity, so they need plenty of food and time before they can even think about going hunting). One study concluded that chimpanzees share meat after hunting to form strong alliances with other chimps. The study I got this info from is titled "Why do chimpanzees hunt and share meat?" by John Mitani and David Watts.