Score
Title
555
AskScience Panel of Scientists XVII
425
AskScience AMA Series: I am a squid biologist, AMA!
5264
At what point is a particle too small to cast a shadow?
81
How do most wild animals die?
50
What do scientists mean when they say "We only know what makes up 5% of the Universe"? What makes up the other 95% of the Universe and how come we don't know what it is ?
4043
How do our bodies build a tolerance to alcohol?
47
Is there a way to measure sharpness - like a scale of sharpness? Thank you
327
Does the temperature of air effect the distance sound can travel?
12
What prevents people in the United States from contacting Malaria from mosquito bites?
13
When I drop an insect (I.e an ant) from a large height (relative - from my chest to the ground), does it “hurt” as bad as it would for us?
9
Why does tungsten (and the elements around it) have a high melting point?
6449
Why is the Liver one of the only organs that grows back when most of it is removed?
3
If electrons move in a copper wire not by each electron travelling all the way, but by bumping into the one ahead and pushing it forward, how can electricity travel faster than the speed of sound of copper?
279
Since the W and Z bosons that mediate the weak force are not massless, does that mean that the weak force does not propagate at light speed?
7
What is the Furry hypothesis, in relation to quantum superposition, and why is it incorrect?
12
How is a breathalyzer a useful metric when testing blood alcohol content?
10
What is the aspect ratio of a nuclear reactor and why does it matter?
2
Can gases/liquids be contained within a magnetic field?
7
Is there a limit to the number of photons a human iris/brain can capture and process?
122
Are there any computer animations of what a supernova would actually look like in real life? What would it look like?
8
Why will your eyes hurt looking at the sun, but not at a lightning strike?
1
Why does diabetes causes kidney damage?
5
Does the age of sperm affect the offspring it creates?
3
Do extroverts comment more often than introverts on Reddit?
159
Why is the molten salt fueled reactor always associated with thorium? Is thorium more suited for MSFRs than uranium?
3
Why are converging-diverging nozzles preferred over converging only nozzles?
0
Why do solid objects exist?
6
Since Earth is slightly flat at the poles and slightly wider at the equator, are there places on Earth where gravity's force is not perfectly downwards?
29
Why would all the land mass be in on one part of the earth (Pangaea) when it first formed?
4
Why are OLED pixels different from LCD pixels?
9033
How do surgeons avoid air bubbles in the bloodstreams after an organ transplant?
3
Other than causing obesity, what are the health risks to consuming sugar?
0
Do birds eat gravel thinking it is food?
2
What's the link between Kirchhoffs law of radiation and Planck's law?
1
How do certain parts of my body know when to stop hair growing?
4
What is quantum mechanical tunneling in relation to field ionization?
10
How does a cell "know" when to produce a protein?
0
Why is the Moon getting farther away from Earth?
3
Can (polar) animals get Photokeratitis/'snow blindness'?
160
What was the diet of early man before the discovery of fire and how soon after did man start "cooking"?
0
How does brain know if some part of our body is being touched without looking at it?
3
Are the cells comprising the liver homogeneous across the entire organ, or are there functional differences from section to section?
10 CALMER_THAN_YOU_ The enigma machine really was unbreakable for its time. It was only broken because of the human factor involved (identifying consistent patterns from German messages meant that we could make the problem smaller). This equates to say you change your 8 digit password every day but I find out you always put 1945 as the last 4 characters. If I’m going to brute force attack your password, I only have to try 10^4 tries instead of 10^8. I effectively made your problem easier because The weakness in your password was the human factor.
6 Lalaithion42 If you had modern knowledge, you could probably build a machine that multiplied large numbers; this would be enough to allow for Diffie-Hellman key exchange. You could also probably build a deterministic random number generator, and use the DH key to seed it. This would allow you to construct a fairly basic stream cipher. This would reduce the chances of operator error from many to exactly one: the operator must choose a number randomly between 1 and the maximum, which would likely have been around a dozen digits. If operators reused numbers, it would become extremely easy to break the system.
4 iranoutofspacehere Most modern cryptosystems use modular arithmetic with upwards of hundreds of digits. They rely on being able to select arbitrarily large prime numbers and multiplying them... The sheer size of the numbers prevents brute force attacks. Storing numbers this large without electronic memory and manipulating them without modern computers is not practical. Basically, any system that could have been implemented before modern computers would be brute forced by modern technology. For reference, a group called the M4 Project was able to use distributed computing on a volunteer basis to brute force some WW2 messages encrypted with 4 rotor Enigma 1-2 months.
9 0 CALMER_THAN_YOU_ The enigma machine really was unbreakable for its time. It was only broken because of the human factor involved (identifying consistent patterns from German messages meant that we could make the problem smaller). This equates to say you change your 8 digit password every day but I find out you always put 1945 as the last 4 characters. If I’m going to brute force attack your password, I only have to try 10^4 tries instead of 10^8. I effectively made your problem easier because The weakness in your password was the human factor.
5 0 Lalaithion42 If you had modern knowledge, you could probably build a machine that multiplied large numbers; this would be enough to allow for Diffie-Hellman key exchange. You could also probably build a deterministic random number generator, and use the DH key to seed it. This would allow you to construct a fairly basic stream cipher. This would reduce the chances of operator error from many to exactly one: the operator must choose a number randomly between 1 and the maximum, which would likely have been around a dozen digits. If operators reused numbers, it would become extremely easy to break the system.
3 0 iranoutofspacehere Most modern cryptosystems use modular arithmetic with upwards of hundreds of digits. They rely on being able to select arbitrarily large prime numbers and multiplying them... The sheer size of the numbers prevents brute force attacks. Storing numbers this large without electronic memory and manipulating them without modern computers is not practical. Basically, any system that could have been implemented before modern computers would be brute forced by modern technology. For reference, a group called the M4 Project was able to use distributed computing on a volunteer basis to brute force some WW2 messages encrypted with 4 rotor Enigma 1-2 months.