Score
Title
321
We're test running allowing /r/askreddit for the next month
146
u/PoppinKream explains why Jared Kushner is likely under investigation.
25
Redditor explains just how broken the US immigration system really is
15
Redditor buys bike from crackhead at 3AM. Bike's owner shows up with proof of ownership.
24
User explains one reason alcholics build tolerance, and why detox is dangerous
790
Redditor describes the worst two hour helicopter ride imaginable.
4
Reddit comment chain turns in to a Trump themed version of supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.
17
Redditor explains why he watches Let’s Plays
5
Request for instructions to a lego automated fleshlight
162
/u/Nicknam4 writes a 274 word comment entirely omitting the letter "a"
40
User explains emotional connection to Trump Tweets
21
u/xenongfx's Advice from five years ago. It's currently helping me breathe normally for the first time in days.
108
/u/Bumblemeister describes the adorable human race as if from a outside alien observer.
5
A hypothetical question about God leads to the creation of a new religion, complete with OC copypasta.
31
/u/LouRider Explains How To Deal With In-Laws
1
You Are Goddamn Right Pokémon is Dark
461
/u/bad_luck_dragon shares a compiled list of all recent attacks on free speech and media
46
Redditor fells life is meaningless after meditation, gets an in depth reply.
21
Kind redditors gifted money to another Venezuelan User for food and tickets to emigrate for the entire family
54
u/Cteinfused starts a Dr. Seuss story about Daddy Daughter Snowboard Time
24
/u/Says_Jesus_Christ explains Paris' architectural design, expansion, and environmental considerations
7
Redditor shares his story of doing Jury Nullification as a juror for an 18 year old kid.
40
User accurately describes each state' personality and whereabouts at a party.
134
Dad does a meme how he cries most days missing his son who is at uni.Lady replies with how he should tell him because her dad didn't, she took it he wasn't that bothered, not that he worried what to say/didn't want to bother her and she only found out how much he cared & missed her after he died
2
u/daitosh describes what it means to be human "...human nature is to protect each other...humans will throw themselves into floods and flames to safe a stranger, often killing themsleves in the processes..."
180
Redditor explains why humans cannot bite through their own fingers
169
Redditor identifies music from the tattoo of another redditor's deceased friend
39
/u/TheSeaOfThySoul beautifully bamboozles bystanders in a post about rare items
340
/u/ngr900 navigates the complexities of sexual consent and the potential issues of "enthusiastic consent".
0
Writer says "you shouldn't kiss someone without asking first" in article. Commenter states why a person would make such a rule.
0
User digs up ancient, relevant link
291
Astronomer /u/Andromeda321 explains to a skeptical user that the universe is not expanding into anything, using a clear analogy
13779
Vikings Fans donate $84k and counting in recognition of sportsmanship of injured player who stayed on field for final play after losing the game
0
Return of the king
51
u/Thrashy demonstrates how, in many ways, CRT monitors are more technologically complex than LEDs.
59
Users contribute countless examples of panoramic pictures gone wrong
50
Girl loses family home of 21 years and all material possessions to a fire. Video game developers provide financial and emotional support because she was a player of their game.
37
An AskReddit thread about "nice" Black Mirror concepts gives way to a heartwarming story about technology
115
/u/RamessesTheOK explains heritage vs racial pride.
32
u/________j________ explains how electronics work
0
Redditor offers to help another with a safe built into their home.
61 TimeKillerAccount Make sure to read past the linked comment. The linked comment gets about half their points wrong, and their conclusions are some of the most silly things I have read this week. The reply comments really fix the issues.
25 Stillhart Interesting read, especially the comments correcting some major points.
41 uffefl Fairly terrible read all in all. The top reply addresses most of the wrongs. On top of that I'd like to add that we're nowhere near the point where desktops completely disappear; if you want portability you're paying a premium for it (or an excessive premium if you pick up an Apple laptop). And high-end performance is just not available in a laptop. Gaming, VR, and people that actually use their computers for more than office apps, will still need the power that a desktop supplies.
8 seifyk This guy is talking like Intel and Apple both operate in the same market today. That's hasn't been true for like 25 or 30 years.
12 po8 First, how is this "explain like I'm five?" Try showing /u/dont_forget_canada's comment to a five-year-old and see how far you get. *(Edit: Yes, I get that it's not literally for five-year-olds. But an awful lot of folks in the comments seemed to be completely lost.)* Second, as someone with CPU-designer buddies, this article is 15 kinds of wrong about all the stuff that matters. I won't bother to elaborate, since as others have pointed out the rebuttal comments are mostly on-point. Apple became a walled garden in 1984, when the Macintosh became the first seriously successful consumer computer that had all its hardware and software built by the same company. The original Macs had Motorola 68Ks in them, so it's not anything special about the PowerPC that was the cause of this. Apple has always built hardware-software combinations that are cheap and simple, which has allowed them to make high profit margins on their products.
4 AKraiderfan OP is all sorts of wrong, it is every evident in his very first rebuttal to the replies...because he replied with "yeah but".
7 mrshestia That was an absolutely fascinating read. Thanks for sharing!
2 paleo2002 Interesting bit of Apple history and some insight for the future. I've been a Mac user for almost 25 years. I was actually really happy when Apple switched to Intel and "caught up" with hardware specs. But its definitely been feeling like Apple has forgotten the Mac and desktop computing in general lately. Right now I've got a 2012 MacMini for day-to-day and work, and a gaming PC I broken down and built two years ago. I keep waiting for Apple to put out an update for the Mini. But, it sounds like I should learn to use the iOS versions of Keynote and Numbers instead.
2 Atheist101 Thats still way over my head....I understood like 20% of that post
1 redditor99880 Tailosive Tech on YouTube does a great job explaining how the closed ecosystem works.
1 DTravers >explains why apple became a walled garden No it doesn't! When people say that, they're talking about apps needing to be approved by Apple to be allowed on their store and making installing them from third party sources difficult. This comment just talks about hardware.
1 krepitus I remember Jobs back in the old days, shrieking about Windows proprietary nature.
1 Tonkarz ARM CPUs might be good for notebook class laptops. The kind that can browse the net and process words. But without some big developments very soon they aren't about to get competitive with Intel or AMD in the desktop space. It's telling that the linked post says that PCs will get thinner and lighter and get better battery life; how is this possible when PCs conform to ATX standards? They are thinking only of laptops and then only a very specific kind of laptop. I'm not saying it won't happen, just that they'd better jump on that.