Score
Title
24
Weekly Recommendation Thread for the week of February 23, 2018
9023
Volume 1 of The Legend of The Condor Heroes, "the LOTR of Chinese literature", now available
248
On the joy of finishing books....
21932
Libraries are tossing millions of books to make way for study spaces and coffee shops
44
guilty pleasure reads
10
Let’s play a game again!!!
9
What Is a great book that would make a bad movie, and/or a bad book that would make a great movie?
38
Great series, bad books
13
Just saw Annihilation in theaters. Book to movie adaptations can be either hit or miss. This was both
11
Don't read a book for the sake of reading it, read something you actually enjoy!
4
The Red Pyramid Review
3
What are 20 works of Fiction that everyone should read before age 30 and why?
10
15 Major Award-Winning Novels You've Probably Never Heard Of
3
Leo Tolstoy Makes a List of the 50+ Books That Influenced Him Most (1891)
2
Something I really don't understand about the Dursleys in Harry Potter.
2
Review of White Sand: Volume 2 (by Brandon Sanderson)
3
BBC Radio 4 - Bookclub: Douglas Adams discusses The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
3
Reviving my love for literature
3
Essays from Zadie Smith's "Feel Free" and Review
3
5 Huge 'Annihilation' Changes from the Jeff VanderMeer Book
26
Finally Reading Harry Potter as a High School Senior...
1
Does anyone know where I can purchase the entire collection of James boswell’s diaries?
10
Catch 22, I can't seem to catch it
1
What do you do when you have a book you are enjoying but don't feel you can read in public?
3
The Talisman by Stephen King (Thoughts?)
1
What's the opening paragraph in chapter one in the book you are currently reading?
373
To people who underline/highlight library books
0
What's Stephen King's obsession with turtles?
5
Just Finished Children of Men
2
'The Future Is Happening Right Now': An Interview With Jeff VanderMeer
1
Game of Thrones: what am I missing by not reading the books?
1
Why conclusions important and what are some good and bad examples of a conclusion to a story?
7
Which character did you like the most - Marie-Laure or Werner from 'All the light we cannot see' ?
4
[Spoilers-ish] In the middle of The Catcher in the Rye, quick -quite stupid- question.
1
Questions about The Demon Lover by Elizabeth Bowen
26
After Annihilation: 10 strange sci-fi books that should be on screen
8
Do you set an upper limit as to how much you read in a day?
3
[Discuss] Jagannath by Karin Tidbeck. Weird af.
3
Wheel of Times, Lord of the rings parallels
9998
Amazon confirm they will be adapting Iain M Banks' Culture series for TV
35
I am obsessed with the Dyatlov Pass Incident after reading Dead Mountain: The Untold True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident
31 Deac15 I adore Walter Moers' Zamonien books. The *13 1/2 Lives on Captain Bluebear* is the most well known and popular, but its more episodic rather than having a singular plot, which isn't my cup of tea. My favorite of his is actually *The City of Dreaming Books* because of the crazy adventure beneath the city filled with bizarre creatures and monsters. The book also serves as Moers' own love letter to literature and reading. *Ensel und Krete* is also a quick read that wonderfully parodies Hansel and Gretel. The world he has built is just amazing, and the way he uses language is so unique, inventive, and clever. I have only read his books in German, so unfortunately, I do not know how well they have been translated to English, but if you want fantasy of a different kind, then he is a great author to read.
19 antijazz93 Nobody mentioned Hermann Hesse yet? While the Steppenwolf is probably his most famous book, my favourite one is Siddhartha. Other authors I love who write in German but aren't German are Robert Musil (The confusions of young Torless, The man without qualities) and Friedrich Dürrenmatt (The visit, The execution of justice).
17 MamaJody *All Quiet on the Western Front* is amazing. I think it's the first war book that I've read from the perspective of a soldier, and it's incredibly brutal, confronting, and moving. It's one of the best books I've ever read, and I think everyone should read it.
15 honnomushi Poetry wise, I really enjoy Heinrich Heine. I also really like Michael Ende's **Momo**. I'm planning to read **The Neverending Story** soon.
13 ElBarronSabeCyber Thomas Mann - Death in Venice. Actually, there are a bunch of other even more lauded Thomas Mann books that I've been meaning to read for a while now, like The Magic Mountain. Maybe I will finally read *that* this month!
11 Duke_Paul Well, literature-adjacent, but Brecht's Dreigroschenoper and, of course, Goethe's Faust are a couple of my favorite German works.
10 Deac15 *The Perfume* by Patrick Sueskind, is a great book about a serial killer with an extraordinary sense of smell who murders girls in order to make perfume from them.
8 [deleted] *Michael Ende* always comes to mind when thinking about german authors. I'm german and I grew up with his storys. Storys like 'Die unendliche Geschichte' 'Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer'. There is even a puppet theater in my home town who played 'Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer'. Was one of my favorite storys, and still is.
8 LightYagamemes The Clown, by Heinrich Böll, is probably my favorite German novel. It's an interesting exploration of Germany's social climate post WWII, as seen through the eyes of a Holden Caulfield-esque narrator (thankfully with a bit less teen angst).
11 raymaehn I'm in love with Marc-Uwe Kling's Kangaroo-Books. They describe the life of a comedian and a communist kangaroo who live together in a flat in Berlin. There are three books (the audiobooks are even better), all only in German, but there's a kind of "highlights reel" that's been translated into English. I definitely recommend it.
5 NamenIos [Walter Kenpowski](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Kempowski) is one of the lesser known\* typical German authors who captured the country and people very well. All for Nothing came out two years ago in an English translation and the tenth anniversary of his death is in a few weeks. I can highly recommend to check him out. [Arno Schmidt](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arno_Schmidt) is another author I can recommend, he has normal books too, don't treat Bottom's Dream(? Zettels Traum) as his only work. I am not sure how translatable his work is though. \* at least it seems to me like this
10 DKmennesket Franz Kafka wasn't techinically German, but he wrote *in* German, so I guess it kinda counts. More recently, *Der Turm* (*The Tower*) by Uwe Tellkamp. And since no-one has mentioned Stefan Zweig yet, I guess I will - he's increasingly relevant now as a reminder of a time just 80 years ago when Europe was a continent that you fled *from*.
11 [deleted] Look who's back [OT: Er ist wieder da] by Timur Vernes (2012) is a great thought experiment, in which Adolf Hilter reappears in Berlin 2012 and struggles with past, present and future of himself and Germany. You will catch yourself agreeing on some points made in the book and laugh at things which should not really be funny at this point anymore. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14897790-er-ist-wieder-da Attempt on Translated Synopsis: >Summer 2011. Adolf Hitler awakens on an empty site in Berlin-Mitte. No war, no party, no Eva Braun. Stuck with peace, thousands of foreigners and Angela Merkel. 66 Years after his supposed suicide he finds himself in past Germany and starts, against any possibility a new career - in TV. This hitler is no joke and therefore shockingly real. And the country, in which he appears is too: cynical, unrestrained, obsessed with success and without a chance against the rabble-rouser (Hitler) and the addiction of quotas, clicks and likes. Parody? Satire? Political Comedy? Everything and more. There is also an interesting movie adaption, though I don't know if there is an english version available, I've watched the german dubbed one on UK-Netflix E:/ edited goodreads link and added synopsis
4 mifedor Goethe and Schiller.
4 _muKs This is a great thread. I'm currently learning German and I wasn't sure what books to read. Now I have great suggestions. Thanks :D
4 Dos_Manos I have loved every WG Sebald book I've ever read - strange, glacial, ambiguous beauty on every page.
5 [deleted] [deleted]
3 icouldberong I love the novels of Gunther Grass, dealing with the post-Nazi culture with bizarre characters and psychological insight.
7 BROBAN_HYPE_TRAIN One of my favorite books in German is [Measuring the World by Daniel Kehlmann](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measuring_the_World).
3 pearloz The Neverending Story, baby!
3 behemotrakau I am a big fan of Judith Hermann. Her short stories have some intonation which makes me feel the time. Her female characters are so strong and stories so simple.
3 danklymemingdexter He's little read now, but I'm going to put in a word for Hans Hellmut Kirst, many of whose books were published in English in the 60s and 70s. **Night of the Generals** is probably his best known book (there was a film), and it's really effective and quite chilling.
3 tepidstringysemen I've almost finished [Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1337448.Wir_Kinder_vom_Bahnhof_Zoo), my first book in German. I also found a copy of Tschick on a friend's bookshelf, read a few pages, and found it interesting. Anyone else read it?
29 0 Deac15 I adore Walter Moers' Zamonien books. The *13 1/2 Lives on Captain Bluebear* is the most well known and popular, but its more episodic rather than having a singular plot, which isn't my cup of tea. My favorite of his is actually *The City of Dreaming Books* because of the crazy adventure beneath the city filled with bizarre creatures and monsters. The book also serves as Moers' own love letter to literature and reading. *Ensel und Krete* is also a quick read that wonderfully parodies Hansel and Gretel. The world he has built is just amazing, and the way he uses language is so unique, inventive, and clever. I have only read his books in German, so unfortunately, I do not know how well they have been translated to English, but if you want fantasy of a different kind, then he is a great author to read.
19 0 antijazz93 Nobody mentioned Hermann Hesse yet? While the Steppenwolf is probably his most famous book, my favourite one is Siddhartha. Other authors I love who write in German but aren't German are Robert Musil (The confusions of young Torless, The man without qualities) and Friedrich Dürrenmatt (The visit, The execution of justice).
16 0 MamaJody *All Quiet on the Western Front* is amazing. I think it's the first war book that I've read from the perspective of a soldier, and it's incredibly brutal, confronting, and moving. It's one of the best books I've ever read, and I think everyone should read it.
14 0 honnomushi Poetry wise, I really enjoy Heinrich Heine. I also really like Michael Ende's **Momo**. I'm planning to read **The Neverending Story** soon.
13 0 ElBarronSabeCyber Thomas Mann - Death in Venice. Actually, there are a bunch of other even more lauded Thomas Mann books that I've been meaning to read for a while now, like The Magic Mountain. Maybe I will finally read *that* this month!
12 0 Duke_Paul Well, literature-adjacent, but Brecht's Dreigroschenoper and, of course, Goethe's Faust are a couple of my favorite German works.
11 0 Deac15 *The Perfume* by Patrick Sueskind, is a great book about a serial killer with an extraordinary sense of smell who murders girls in order to make perfume from them.
8 0 [deleted] *Michael Ende* always comes to mind when thinking about german authors. I'm german and I grew up with his storys. Storys like 'Die unendliche Geschichte' 'Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer'. There is even a puppet theater in my home town who played 'Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer'. Was one of my favorite storys, and still is.
8 0 LightYagamemes The Clown, by Heinrich Böll, is probably my favorite German novel. It's an interesting exploration of Germany's social climate post WWII, as seen through the eyes of a Holden Caulfield-esque narrator (thankfully with a bit less teen angst).
9 0 raymaehn I'm in love with Marc-Uwe Kling's Kangaroo-Books. They describe the life of a comedian and a communist kangaroo who live together in a flat in Berlin. There are three books (the audiobooks are even better), all only in German, but there's a kind of "highlights reel" that's been translated into English. I definitely recommend it.
5 0 NamenIos [Walter Kenpowski](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Kempowski) is one of the lesser known\* typical German authors who captured the country and people very well. All for Nothing came out two years ago in an English translation and the tenth anniversary of his death is in a few weeks. I can highly recommend to check him out. [Arno Schmidt](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arno_Schmidt) is another author I can recommend, he has normal books too, don't treat Bottom's Dream(? Zettels Traum) as his only work. I am not sure how translatable his work is though. \* at least it seems to me like this
9 0 DKmennesket Franz Kafka wasn't techinically German, but he wrote *in* German, so I guess it kinda counts. More recently, *Der Turm* (*The Tower*) by Uwe Tellkamp. And since no-one has mentioned Stefan Zweig yet, I guess I will - he's increasingly relevant now as a reminder of a time just 80 years ago when Europe was a continent that you fled *from*.
10 0 [deleted] Look who's back [OT: Er ist wieder da] by Timur Vernes (2012) is a great thought experiment, in which Adolf Hilter reappears in Berlin 2012 and struggles with past, present and future of himself and Germany. You will catch yourself agreeing on some points made in the book and laugh at things which should not really be funny at this point anymore. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14897790-er-ist-wieder-da Attempt on Translated Synopsis: >Summer 2011. Adolf Hitler awakens on an empty site in Berlin-Mitte. No war, no party, no Eva Braun. Stuck with peace, thousands of foreigners and Angela Merkel. 66 Years after his supposed suicide he finds himself in past Germany and starts, against any possibility a new career - in TV. This hitler is no joke and therefore shockingly real. And the country, in which he appears is too: cynical, unrestrained, obsessed with success and without a chance against the rabble-rouser (Hitler) and the addiction of quotas, clicks and likes. Parody? Satire? Political Comedy? Everything and more. There is also an interesting movie adaption, though I don't know if there is an english version available, I've watched the german dubbed one on UK-Netflix E:/ edited goodreads link and added synopsis
4 0 mifedor Goethe and Schiller.
3 0 _muKs This is a great thread. I'm currently learning German and I wasn't sure what books to read. Now I have great suggestions. Thanks :D
4 0 Dos_Manos I have loved every WG Sebald book I've ever read - strange, glacial, ambiguous beauty on every page.
4 0 [deleted] [deleted]
4 0 icouldberong I love the novels of Gunther Grass, dealing with the post-Nazi culture with bizarre characters and psychological insight.
9 0 BROBAN_HYPE_TRAIN One of my favorite books in German is [Measuring the World by Daniel Kehlmann](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measuring_the_World).
3 0 pearloz The Neverending Story, baby!
3 0 behemotrakau I am a big fan of Judith Hermann. Her short stories have some intonation which makes me feel the time. Her female characters are so strong and stories so simple.
3 0 danklymemingdexter He's little read now, but I'm going to put in a word for Hans Hellmut Kirst, many of whose books were published in English in the 60s and 70s. **Night of the Generals** is probably his best known book (there was a film), and it's really effective and quite chilling.
3 0 tepidstringysemen I've almost finished [Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo](https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1337448.Wir_Kinder_vom_Bahnhof_Zoo), my first book in German. I also found a copy of Tschick on a friend's bookshelf, read a few pages, and found it interesting. Anyone else read it?