Score
Title
31
What Books Are You Reading This Week? February 19, 2018
4658
Hi there! I'm Jason Matthews, former CIA officer and author of Red Sparrow, soon to be a major motion picture. Ask Me Anything!
8547
The Art of War by Sun Tsu is more about life than it is about War.
21
Any Pendragon Fans?
5
Do your have a reading log? If so, how do you organize it?
31
Thoughts on Foucault's Pendulum? (Umberto Eco)
53
The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury
2
Tolstoy on his early life
471
Started The Brothers Karamazov and for a classic, it’s not at all boring. Gotten hooked after a long hiatus from not reading.
1
Just finished reading Farenheit 451 for the first time
980
Any Inkheart fans?
55
Long-lost manual reveals surprising secrets of 1720s sex
14240
If the decline of Barnes and Nobel depresses you, check out Waterstones, a UK book seller which is going from strength to strength.
1
Any Sci fi fan who read The Actrix Stone?
2
How much pages do you guys read per day?
40
Thoughts on Hyperion?
49
State without fear of judgment a book you DNF (did not finish) and why!
1
for those who have read and watched Dark Places by Gillian Flynn
4
If you keep a digital book journal, what do you use?
3
What is the Dark Souls of books?
13
Struggling with Stephen King books
11
How do you perceive the look of a character in a book?
19
In defense of a book you love that most people hate
7
Kafka Was a Terrible Boyfriend
9
Kafka "The Trial" parable discussion
7
So you loved East of Eden?
58
Do you read a complete series back-to-back?
5
Do you ever get tired of reading?
2
The Domestic Thriller Is Having a Moment
2
Dan Brown or David Lagercrantz?
10
How does reading several works by the same author affect the way you read the book?
43
Ten years ago on this day my sister wrote a poem about my love of books
39
Popular Book Covers by Genre (Visualization)
0
Review for Absolute Sandman: Vol 1 by Gaiman
6425
Barnes & Noble is killing itself
2
Barns & Noble vs Waterstones
3
Is there a study about how different people perceive books differently?
7
Anyone notice this possible mistake in chapter 33 of The Handmaids Tale?
5
Thomas Morris: 53 ways to improve your short stories
33
After so much academic reading, it's strange that novels don't excite me much anymore. Anyone else in a similar position and feel the same way?
0
Karley Sciortino is Your Slutty, Post-Woke Carrie Bradshaw: On her book "Slutever: Dispatches from a Sexually Autonomous Woman in a Post?Shame World"
12 FrodoBolsillon The most important thing to me is that it fits the context they are in. If you take LotR for example it seems to work perfectly because everyone of the fellowship is biased in a way. We learn that elves and dwarves, especially the mirkwood elves and the dwarves of the lonely mountain, have had a rough relationship to each other for centuries. Aragorn grew up with the elves, which makes him estrange to the other humans, particularly Boromir and so on.. It makes sense and makes the reader all the more happy to see the friendships blooming. On the other hand there was a book series I read as a teen where the protagonist gathered a cast of exclusivly hot young women. There it just seemed the author found a way to act out his fantasies.
10 SYLOH I roll my eyes every time there is a "Dwarf character" or an "Elf character", instead of a character who is a Dwarf or a character who is an Elf. These characters remind of those awful characters from the 90s who's sole character feature was their race, gender, or sexual orientation. It's just lazy writing to let any single thing take over a character. So no, if a character is an elf or dwarf I won't automatically hate it. If being an elf or a dwarf is their ONLY characteristic, then I'd hate them.
6 Duke_Paul If an author can write them well, then it makes no difference to me. If, on the other hand, [they write characters like this](https://twitter.com/awfulfantasy/status/595364160587730945?lang=en), then I'll pass.
5 Netla I don't really care about what gender, race or species the characters are, although such differences are always good for examining cultural differences and creating interesting group dynamics. I think that if they're too homogeneous - in one way or another - the story can get boring, and a very heterogeneous group can make things confusing and make it look like the author was trying too hard to be all-inclusive. I like it when each character brings something special to the story, e.g. where one is a good fighter but perhaps bad at communicating with others, while another is a good communicator but a lousy fighter, and so on. Abilities don't all have to be opposites of each other - they can be complimentary or overlap. A fantasy novel I read many years ago had a cast that consisted of a young woman, a knight in rusty armour, and a group of animals on a quest where each had a specific role and unique problem-solving skills. I found that quite an interesting cast. (*The Unlikely Ones* by Mary Brown). I dislike Mary Sue characters - those amazing creatures who are practically perfect in every way. A group of them is even worse.
3 billponderoas I love anything featuring a tavern wench.
3 nekped I like books with fictional races. Most of the time it makes those characters unique and more memorable than if they were boring old humes. Sometimes it makes me want to roll my eyes, not this trope again. But it won't make or break the book for me. Maybe.
3 pregnantchihuahua3 My favorite thing to see is characters that are not just literally human, but also act human. Malazan is my best example when we follow around the marines. We see them grieve, laugh, fight, etc. They act like real people. They're not always heroic, some are cowardly, some are great people, some are compete dicks, and on. War and death affects them, they don't just go through the motions as if killing massive groups of people is second nature. They don't blindly follow orders as if they're just a hive mind. I think that's one thing a lot of authors get wrong when writing about people. Also this isn't to say I don't like the use of other races at all. What I don't like is stereotypical races. Elves that live in a perfect utopian society and are all gorgeous, short stocky dwarves with beards and pickaxes etc. Be original!
2 Traummich My favorite fantasy books are from 1980s-1990s. They feature all Tolkein or DnD style non magical creatures. The ones that don't feature those characters I still enjoy, because they might feature their own personal inventions.
13 0 FrodoBolsillon The most important thing to me is that it fits the context they are in. If you take LotR for example it seems to work perfectly because everyone of the fellowship is biased in a way. We learn that elves and dwarves, especially the mirkwood elves and the dwarves of the lonely mountain, have had a rough relationship to each other for centuries. Aragorn grew up with the elves, which makes him estrange to the other humans, particularly Boromir and so on.. It makes sense and makes the reader all the more happy to see the friendships blooming. On the other hand there was a book series I read as a teen where the protagonist gathered a cast of exclusivly hot young women. There it just seemed the author found a way to act out his fantasies.
9 0 SYLOH I roll my eyes every time there is a "Dwarf character" or an "Elf character", instead of a character who is a Dwarf or a character who is an Elf. These characters remind of those awful characters from the 90s who's sole character feature was their race, gender, or sexual orientation. It's just lazy writing to let any single thing take over a character. So no, if a character is an elf or dwarf I won't automatically hate it. If being an elf or a dwarf is their ONLY characteristic, then I'd hate them.
7 0 Duke_Paul If an author can write them well, then it makes no difference to me. If, on the other hand, [they write characters like this](https://twitter.com/awfulfantasy/status/595364160587730945?lang=en), then I'll pass.
4 0 Netla I don't really care about what gender, race or species the characters are, although such differences are always good for examining cultural differences and creating interesting group dynamics. I think that if they're too homogeneous - in one way or another - the story can get boring, and a very heterogeneous group can make things confusing and make it look like the author was trying too hard to be all-inclusive. I like it when each character brings something special to the story, e.g. where one is a good fighter but perhaps bad at communicating with others, while another is a good communicator but a lousy fighter, and so on. Abilities don't all have to be opposites of each other - they can be complimentary or overlap. A fantasy novel I read many years ago had a cast that consisted of a young woman, a knight in rusty armour, and a group of animals on a quest where each had a specific role and unique problem-solving skills. I found that quite an interesting cast. (*The Unlikely Ones* by Mary Brown). I dislike Mary Sue characters - those amazing creatures who are practically perfect in every way. A group of them is even worse.
5 0 billponderoas I love anything featuring a tavern wench.
3 0 nekped I like books with fictional races. Most of the time it makes those characters unique and more memorable than if they were boring old humes. Sometimes it makes me want to roll my eyes, not this trope again. But it won't make or break the book for me. Maybe.
3 0 pregnantchihuahua3 My favorite thing to see is characters that are not just literally human, but also act human. Malazan is my best example when we follow around the marines. We see them grieve, laugh, fight, etc. They act like real people. They're not always heroic, some are cowardly, some are great people, some are compete dicks, and on. War and death affects them, they don't just go through the motions as if killing massive groups of people is second nature. They don't blindly follow orders as if they're just a hive mind. I think that's one thing a lot of authors get wrong when writing about people. Also this isn't to say I don't like the use of other races at all. What I don't like is stereotypical races. Elves that live in a perfect utopian society and are all gorgeous, short stocky dwarves with beards and pickaxes etc. Be original!
2 0 Traummich My favorite fantasy books are from 1980s-1990s. They feature all Tolkein or DnD style non magical creatures. The ones that don't feature those characters I still enjoy, because they might feature their own personal inventions.