Score
Title
179
The /r/books book club pick for September/October is Earthcore by Scott Sigler!
47
Banned Books Week: September 2017
3677
Portable 17th-Century Book-Shaped Micro-Library Holds 50 Tiny Books - "Back in the 1600s, long before science fiction authors dreamed up digital e-readers, this Jacobean traveling library was making the rounds, housing dozens of small books in a larger book-shaped case."
1206
Getting frustrated with authors as of late... It seems like no-one writes stories with an end anymore.
893
Sherlock Holmes taught Kareem Abdul-Jabbar how to win NBA games
891
The It factor: exploring Stephen King’s Maine... With the film of Stephen King’s It breaking box-office records, a tour of the brooding locations in and around his home town that inspired the ‘King of Fright’
29276
Volunteers rescue thousands of books from Mosul library destroyed by Islamic State
13
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick
16
A Secret History of the Pissing Figure in Art: A new book traces a steady stream of urine through the centuries
4
Which sci-fi book is has the grandest scope you can think of?
4
Books about magic
6
I miss Frank Muller - Dark Tower Narrator
5
Lillian Ross, a Pioneer of Literary Journalism, Has Died at Ninety-Nine
2
Snow Crash - Neal Stephenson Review (no spoilers)
8
Top 10 books about consciousness
4
Does this dialogue technique have a name?
1
Happy Birthday Stephen King
2717
Town of Escondido Privatizes City Library
1
Favorite Endings?? [Spoilers]
0
Studies on reading and writing you'd like to share?
2
What books do you remember being read to as a child by a teacher/librarian?
0
Career of Evil and Cuckoos Calling.
4
The War Lord of the Air; Michael Moorcock
2
Can we please stop the nonsense and give Philip Roth a Nobel Prize for Literature before he dies? An Open Letter to the Swedish Academy
20
How long does it take for you to finish a book?
1
How do readers find new and otherwise unknown books that spark their interest?
141
I’m Peter V. Brett, internationally bestselling author of the Demon Cycle series—Come ask me anything!
17
What is the best order to read the Chronicles of Narnia series?
11
Three Body Problem got me to thinking about the weather in Game of Thrones
0
Help with A Sand County Almanac.
14
I've recently discovered the excitement of re-reading books!
1
What do you think of Philip Kerr, the crime novelist?
322
What book do you think of almost every day since reading it?
5
Children and onlookers bemo-an the fate of Jakarta’s three-wheeled library
6
Read my first book, cover to cover, in 10 years. "Tau Zero" by Poul Anderson.
0
Explore 8 of The World’s Only Remaining Gay Bookstores
473
Interesting connection I found between Silence of the Lambs and Infinite Jest.
15
What were your favorite books when you were in high school?
7
Just read the Razor's Edge
193
Your local library's eBooks now appear in Google search
1165
Books age 1,000 years stored in a small African village
3175
Today is the 380th birthday of Samuel Johnson: author, literary critic, lexicographer, and meme.
9 FrodoBolsillon The most important thing to me is that it fits the context they are in. If you take LotR for example it seems to work perfectly because everyone of the fellowship is biased in a way. We learn that elves and dwarves, especially the mirkwood elves and the dwarves of the lonely mountain, have had a rough relationship to each other for centuries. Aragorn grew up with the elves, which makes him estrange to the other humans, particularly Boromir and so on.. It makes sense and makes the reader all the more happy to see the friendships blooming. On the other hand there was a book series I read as a teen where the protagonist gathered a cast of exclusivly hot young women. There it just seemed the author found a way to act out his fantasies.
11 SYLOH I roll my eyes every time there is a "Dwarf character" or an "Elf character", instead of a character who is a Dwarf or a character who is an Elf. These characters remind of those awful characters from the 90s who's sole character feature was their race, gender, or sexual orientation. It's just lazy writing to let any single thing take over a character. So no, if a character is an elf or dwarf I won't automatically hate it. If being an elf or a dwarf is their ONLY characteristic, then I'd hate them.
7 Duke_Paul If an author can write them well, then it makes no difference to me. If, on the other hand, [they write characters like this](https://twitter.com/awfulfantasy/status/595364160587730945?lang=en), then I'll pass.
5 Netla I don't really care about what gender, race or species the characters are, although such differences are always good for examining cultural differences and creating interesting group dynamics. I think that if they're too homogeneous - in one way or another - the story can get boring, and a very heterogeneous group can make things confusing and make it look like the author was trying too hard to be all-inclusive. I like it when each character brings something special to the story, e.g. where one is a good fighter but perhaps bad at communicating with others, while another is a good communicator but a lousy fighter, and so on. Abilities don't all have to be opposites of each other - they can be complimentary or overlap. A fantasy novel I read many years ago had a cast that consisted of a young woman, a knight in rusty armour, and a group of animals on a quest where each had a specific role and unique problem-solving skills. I found that quite an interesting cast. (*The Unlikely Ones* by Mary Brown). I dislike Mary Sue characters - those amazing creatures who are practically perfect in every way. A group of them is even worse.
3 nekped I like books with fictional races. Most of the time it makes those characters unique and more memorable than if they were boring old humes. Sometimes it makes me want to roll my eyes, not this trope again. But it won't make or break the book for me. Maybe.
3 billponderoas I love anything featuring a tavern wench.
3 pregnantchihuahua3 My favorite thing to see is characters that are not just literally human, but also act human. Malazan is my best example when we follow around the marines. We see them grieve, laugh, fight, etc. They act like real people. They're not always heroic, some are cowardly, some are great people, some are compete dicks, and on. War and death affects them, they don't just go through the motions as if killing massive groups of people is second nature. They don't blindly follow orders as if they're just a hive mind. I think that's one thing a lot of authors get wrong when writing about people. Also this isn't to say I don't like the use of other races at all. What I don't like is stereotypical races. Elves that live in a perfect utopian society and are all gorgeous, short stocky dwarves with beards and pickaxes etc. Be original!
2 Traummich My favorite fantasy books are from 1980s-1990s. They feature all Tolkein or DnD style non magical creatures. The ones that don't feature those characters I still enjoy, because they might feature their own personal inventions.
11 0 FrodoBolsillon The most important thing to me is that it fits the context they are in. If you take LotR for example it seems to work perfectly because everyone of the fellowship is biased in a way. We learn that elves and dwarves, especially the mirkwood elves and the dwarves of the lonely mountain, have had a rough relationship to each other for centuries. Aragorn grew up with the elves, which makes him estrange to the other humans, particularly Boromir and so on.. It makes sense and makes the reader all the more happy to see the friendships blooming. On the other hand there was a book series I read as a teen where the protagonist gathered a cast of exclusivly hot young women. There it just seemed the author found a way to act out his fantasies.
10 0 SYLOH I roll my eyes every time there is a "Dwarf character" or an "Elf character", instead of a character who is a Dwarf or a character who is an Elf. These characters remind of those awful characters from the 90s who's sole character feature was their race, gender, or sexual orientation. It's just lazy writing to let any single thing take over a character. So no, if a character is an elf or dwarf I won't automatically hate it. If being an elf or a dwarf is their ONLY characteristic, then I'd hate them.
6 0 Duke_Paul If an author can write them well, then it makes no difference to me. If, on the other hand, [they write characters like this](https://twitter.com/awfulfantasy/status/595364160587730945?lang=en), then I'll pass.
4 0 Netla I don't really care about what gender, race or species the characters are, although such differences are always good for examining cultural differences and creating interesting group dynamics. I think that if they're too homogeneous - in one way or another - the story can get boring, and a very heterogeneous group can make things confusing and make it look like the author was trying too hard to be all-inclusive. I like it when each character brings something special to the story, e.g. where one is a good fighter but perhaps bad at communicating with others, while another is a good communicator but a lousy fighter, and so on. Abilities don't all have to be opposites of each other - they can be complimentary or overlap. A fantasy novel I read many years ago had a cast that consisted of a young woman, a knight in rusty armour, and a group of animals on a quest where each had a specific role and unique problem-solving skills. I found that quite an interesting cast. (*The Unlikely Ones* by Mary Brown). I dislike Mary Sue characters - those amazing creatures who are practically perfect in every way. A group of them is even worse.
3 0 nekped I like books with fictional races. Most of the time it makes those characters unique and more memorable than if they were boring old humes. Sometimes it makes me want to roll my eyes, not this trope again. But it won't make or break the book for me. Maybe.
3 0 billponderoas I love anything featuring a tavern wench.
3 0 pregnantchihuahua3 My favorite thing to see is characters that are not just literally human, but also act human. Malazan is my best example when we follow around the marines. We see them grieve, laugh, fight, etc. They act like real people. They're not always heroic, some are cowardly, some are great people, some are compete dicks, and on. War and death affects them, they don't just go through the motions as if killing massive groups of people is second nature. They don't blindly follow orders as if they're just a hive mind. I think that's one thing a lot of authors get wrong when writing about people. Also this isn't to say I don't like the use of other races at all. What I don't like is stereotypical races. Elves that live in a perfect utopian society and are all gorgeous, short stocky dwarves with beards and pickaxes etc. Be original!
2 0 Traummich My favorite fantasy books are from 1980s-1990s. They feature all Tolkein or DnD style non magical creatures. The ones that don't feature those characters I still enjoy, because they might feature their own personal inventions.