Score
Title
24
Weekly Recommendation Thread for the week of February 23, 2018
9023
Volume 1 of The Legend of The Condor Heroes, "the LOTR of Chinese literature", now available
248
On the joy of finishing books....
21932
Libraries are tossing millions of books to make way for study spaces and coffee shops
44
guilty pleasure reads
10
Let’s play a game again!!!
9
What Is a great book that would make a bad movie, and/or a bad book that would make a great movie?
38
Great series, bad books
13
Just saw Annihilation in theaters. Book to movie adaptations can be either hit or miss. This was both
11
Don't read a book for the sake of reading it, read something you actually enjoy!
4
The Red Pyramid Review
3
What are 20 works of Fiction that everyone should read before age 30 and why?
10
15 Major Award-Winning Novels You've Probably Never Heard Of
3
Leo Tolstoy Makes a List of the 50+ Books That Influenced Him Most (1891)
2
Something I really don't understand about the Dursleys in Harry Potter.
2
Review of White Sand: Volume 2 (by Brandon Sanderson)
3
BBC Radio 4 - Bookclub: Douglas Adams discusses The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
3
Reviving my love for literature
3
Essays from Zadie Smith's "Feel Free" and Review
3
5 Huge 'Annihilation' Changes from the Jeff VanderMeer Book
26
Finally Reading Harry Potter as a High School Senior...
1
Does anyone know where I can purchase the entire collection of James boswell’s diaries?
10
Catch 22, I can't seem to catch it
1
What do you do when you have a book you are enjoying but don't feel you can read in public?
3
The Talisman by Stephen King (Thoughts?)
1
What's the opening paragraph in chapter one in the book you are currently reading?
373
To people who underline/highlight library books
0
What's Stephen King's obsession with turtles?
5
Just Finished Children of Men
2
'The Future Is Happening Right Now': An Interview With Jeff VanderMeer
1
Game of Thrones: what am I missing by not reading the books?
1
Why conclusions important and what are some good and bad examples of a conclusion to a story?
7
Which character did you like the most - Marie-Laure or Werner from 'All the light we cannot see' ?
4
[Spoilers-ish] In the middle of The Catcher in the Rye, quick -quite stupid- question.
1
Questions about The Demon Lover by Elizabeth Bowen
26
After Annihilation: 10 strange sci-fi books that should be on screen
8
Do you set an upper limit as to how much you read in a day?
3
[Discuss] Jagannath by Karin Tidbeck. Weird af.
3
Wheel of Times, Lord of the rings parallels
9998
Amazon confirm they will be adapting Iain M Banks' Culture series for TV
35
I am obsessed with the Dyatlov Pass Incident after reading Dead Mountain: The Untold True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident
26 ofcabbagesandkings14 I agree! I loved Neverwhere and his kids books are awesome (what kid hasn't been terrified by Coraline?!) but I just felt so meh about American Gods. I loved the concept and all of the world building but it almost felt like there were TOO many gods in the story - I got a tease of so many interesting concepts but nothing could really be fully fleshed out.
11 madmoneymcgee >All I came across in the 70% of the novel’s span was just Shadow and Wednesday driving from one place to another, meeting very random characters, the so called old gods, and asking them to join their side on the impending war with the new gods. This seems to bother a lot of people but it's also exactly why I love the book. The writing absolutely creates a perfect moodiness that is easy to get sucked into much like how Shadow gets sucked into the world (and war) of the old Gods. >The characters.. there weren’t any real cherishable characters either. I mean, ok, I liked that Shadow was a nice guy and Mr. Wednesday was obviously the big dude of the whole thing, but no other character made me care even the least bit about them. Not Anansi? Or Mr. Ibis? Or Laura? Or Czernobog?
8 mostlyamess I'm currently listening to it on the drive to work. Using an entire cast of voice actors makes it a lot more interesting. Not sure I could have stuck with it if I was reading the book though.
10 Narrative_Causality You're not the only one. The book lost me when instead of focusing on the gods the book is named after, it decided Shadow should spend half of the book in the middle of nowhere with a plot that has literally nothing to do with the main plot of warring gods. And then when it gets back to the warring gods plot nothing happens except "a mental shift in the world." Wow. Amazing. Real edge-of-your-seat climax stuff there. On top of that, the book was never really all that interesting before the useless road trip. Shadow is the worst protagonist I have ever seen. His wife comes back and his only response is "Okay." Gods are revealed as real to him and his only response is "Okay." Anything happens at all and his only response is "Okay." Jesus christ. And how about those short stories between chapters that served no purpose in the story except to make you wish you were following more interesting gods instead of the most boring protagonist ever?
4 SirThighPiece I hated Ocean at the End of the line. Found American Gods okayish. And am a guy who likes Gaiman.
6 finnylicious As someone who's not a big Gaiman fan at all, I totally disagree. American Gods and Sandman are the only books he's written that have really resonated with me. American Gods I fell into and enjoyed every minute of. There's so much depth and complexity to the novel, and the character interactions are a joy. I found myself getting disappointed whenever the story moved from Wednesday and Shadow's road-trip to a more structured narrative. I also adored Shadow's stay in that little winter town. I'm kind of amazed that you couldn't find any characters to latch onto, too—i thought Jacquel, Ibis, Sam Black Crow, Wednesday, Chad the cop, and Czernobog were all super memorable, well-drawn major characters. And Sandman is legitimately a masterpiece. There's so much going on; it's Gaiman using all of his understanding of myths, archetypes, and fantasy literature to craft his own grand cohesive mythology. It's amazing. I feel like a lot of Gaiman's other work, though, even when aimed at adults, reads like YA fic. Sandman and American Gods are the only books of his I've read that feel like they were written specifically for adults. His short stories really tend to show the very worst of this YA vibe.
3 Siegwyn Honestly, and this is coming from a big Gaiman fan, I enjoyed the tv show more than I did the book.
2 mitthew I like the Gaiman's writing style, and really enjoyed Neverwhere, but yeah, American Gods I would say is a 'good' book rather than a great one. Don't regret reading it one bit, but it's not something I would rush to recommend to friends. In contrast to most people, I actually enjoyed the Lakeside parts.
2 thearmadillo This is one of the most popular opinions shared here often, especially since the show came out.
2 Pensive_Kitty Aren't there two versions of it? I have a vague memory of there being a super long one, and a slightly shorter one, and that the editing of the slightly shorter one made all the difference?
2 thatonewest Actually you're in the majority here! I think a lot of people on posts I've seen on here thought the same thing. I especially did! I agree with you on everything the part about the origin of the Gods in the States was the best. I was super psyched because the concept sounded epic and then I read it in two days and I'm like "dude come on"I think this book had all the potential to be so much better than it was.
2 TenTonApe Yah the book was pretty meh for me to. I just didn't like Shadow, he doesn't react to anything in a satisfying way. The show does a much better job of this than the book. Yes it's realistic for someone to spend an extended period of time freaking out that they made it snow. That's a normal response. Book Shadow just floats through everything without a care.
25 0 ofcabbagesandkings14 I agree! I loved Neverwhere and his kids books are awesome (what kid hasn't been terrified by Coraline?!) but I just felt so meh about American Gods. I loved the concept and all of the world building but it almost felt like there were TOO many gods in the story - I got a tease of so many interesting concepts but nothing could really be fully fleshed out.
10 0 madmoneymcgee >All I came across in the 70% of the novel’s span was just Shadow and Wednesday driving from one place to another, meeting very random characters, the so called old gods, and asking them to join their side on the impending war with the new gods. This seems to bother a lot of people but it's also exactly why I love the book. The writing absolutely creates a perfect moodiness that is easy to get sucked into much like how Shadow gets sucked into the world (and war) of the old Gods. >The characters.. there weren’t any real cherishable characters either. I mean, ok, I liked that Shadow was a nice guy and Mr. Wednesday was obviously the big dude of the whole thing, but no other character made me care even the least bit about them. Not Anansi? Or Mr. Ibis? Or Laura? Or Czernobog?
8 0 mostlyamess I'm currently listening to it on the drive to work. Using an entire cast of voice actors makes it a lot more interesting. Not sure I could have stuck with it if I was reading the book though.
11 0 Narrative_Causality You're not the only one. The book lost me when instead of focusing on the gods the book is named after, it decided Shadow should spend half of the book in the middle of nowhere with a plot that has literally nothing to do with the main plot of warring gods. And then when it gets back to the warring gods plot nothing happens except "a mental shift in the world." Wow. Amazing. Real edge-of-your-seat climax stuff there. On top of that, the book was never really all that interesting before the useless road trip. Shadow is the worst protagonist I have ever seen. His wife comes back and his only response is "Okay." Gods are revealed as real to him and his only response is "Okay." Anything happens at all and his only response is "Okay." Jesus christ. And how about those short stories between chapters that served no purpose in the story except to make you wish you were following more interesting gods instead of the most boring protagonist ever?
4 0 SirThighPiece I hated Ocean at the End of the line. Found American Gods okayish. And am a guy who likes Gaiman.
7 0 finnylicious As someone who's not a big Gaiman fan at all, I totally disagree. American Gods and Sandman are the only books he's written that have really resonated with me. American Gods I fell into and enjoyed every minute of. There's so much depth and complexity to the novel, and the character interactions are a joy. I found myself getting disappointed whenever the story moved from Wednesday and Shadow's road-trip to a more structured narrative. I also adored Shadow's stay in that little winter town. I'm kind of amazed that you couldn't find any characters to latch onto, too—i thought Jacquel, Ibis, Sam Black Crow, Wednesday, Chad the cop, and Czernobog were all super memorable, well-drawn major characters. And Sandman is legitimately a masterpiece. There's so much going on; it's Gaiman using all of his understanding of myths, archetypes, and fantasy literature to craft his own grand cohesive mythology. It's amazing. I feel like a lot of Gaiman's other work, though, even when aimed at adults, reads like YA fic. Sandman and American Gods are the only books of his I've read that feel like they were written specifically for adults. His short stories really tend to show the very worst of this YA vibe.
3 0 Siegwyn Honestly, and this is coming from a big Gaiman fan, I enjoyed the tv show more than I did the book.
2 0 mitthew I like the Gaiman's writing style, and really enjoyed Neverwhere, but yeah, American Gods I would say is a 'good' book rather than a great one. Don't regret reading it one bit, but it's not something I would rush to recommend to friends. In contrast to most people, I actually enjoyed the Lakeside parts.
2 0 thearmadillo This is one of the most popular opinions shared here often, especially since the show came out.
2 0 Pensive_Kitty Aren't there two versions of it? I have a vague memory of there being a super long one, and a slightly shorter one, and that the editing of the slightly shorter one made all the difference?
2 0 thatonewest Actually you're in the majority here! I think a lot of people on posts I've seen on here thought the same thing. I especially did! I agree with you on everything the part about the origin of the Gods in the States was the best. I was super psyched because the concept sounded epic and then I read it in two days and I'm like "dude come on"I think this book had all the potential to be so much better than it was.
2 0 TenTonApe Yah the book was pretty meh for me to. I just didn't like Shadow, he doesn't react to anything in a satisfying way. The show does a much better job of this than the book. Yes it's realistic for someone to spend an extended period of time freaking out that they made it snow. That's a normal response. Book Shadow just floats through everything without a care.