Score
Title
170
Best Books of 2017 - Results
64
What Books Are You Reading This Week? January 15, 2018
15624
Stephen King aims to help bookstore owner who lost collection in flood
15025
Mike D Says Beastie Boys Memoir Is Coming Out This Year
32
“Fire and Fury” Is on Track to Beat “The Art of the Deal,” Trump’s Own Bestseller
26
For anyone having trouble focusing while reading
19
Cover reveal for Stephen King's Upcoming novel, "The Outsider"
6
Do you take time after a book or dive into another?
16
Peter Mayle, author of A Year in Provence, dies aged 78
28
I've just finished reading Tolstoy's ' 'The Death of Ivan Illyich' and these are my thoughts.
5
What qualifies as a "book"/"novel"
7
Do you think that certain books , genres hold more value than others?
120
Just how bad is your TBR (to-be-read) pile?
15
Well bloody hell! We did it. A 12 month reading quest to rediscover our love for reading.
3
Help with reading Faulkner!
4
John Barton, co-founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, dead at 89
8
Whats your opinion on making notes or underlining in your books?
1
[Opinion] Brave New World + Revisited
6
Just finished reading "Life With Billy" and would really like to discuss it if anyone has read it?
2
What was your experience with Walden by Henry David Thoreau?
16
What percentage of the books you read are written by women/men?
21
Exactly what gets a book banned from prisons, in one US state’s spreadsheet
1
The Catcher in the Rye
1
What is in your head while you are reading? Images? Someone narrating? Ideas? Feelings?
1
Lady Windermere’s Fan, or is it Wilde’s?
0
Which authors do you consider underrated and what are the best works you read from them?
1
JoyceImages - Ulysses illustrated using postcards, photos, and other documents contemporary with the events of the novel.
6
Why was Danglars' letter to the Crown Prosecutor incriminating in the Count of Monte Cristo?
1
Old Russian scientific and religious books are now in my possession...
12
the winter brings out the reader in me again
10
best new science books released this winter
24
This might be a stupid question but how are you guys able to read while commuting?
19566
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Making a memory that will last forever.
4
An interesting insider’s perspective on ‘the blurb’
9
Thoughts on novellas in comparison to novels.
3
I'm reading The Natural for class, and something has been bugging the hell out of me. [SPOILERS]
8
5 things to know about Murakami's Killing Commendatore
396
Original Stephen King Manuscripts Destroyed After Water Main Breaks in Downtown Bangor
8
Lupita Nyong’o to Publish a Children’s Book.
63
Required Reading
25
What books changed you?
2
The Literature of Bad Sex
5 theotheredge I guess it's going to be a personal decision. I loved it. Taleb is way too impressed with himself, and that made the book initially hard for me to read. However, if you can ignore his tone, the content of the book is terrific. Solid examples, well explained, with interesting consequences and implications. It's been a while since I read it, but I still think about the chain of events that made me who I am and how none of the most significant were ever planned for or even expected.
4 cassiodorus I think the concept of the book is better than his execution in writing it.
4 SXNE2 Antifragile is better but you will still be put off by his writing style. You don’t need to read much more than the first few chapters of “The Black Swan” to understand the point. Taleb is obviously very impressed with his own intellect but it wears a bit thin.
7 alesserweevil My personal, very much in the minority opinion is that it's a terrible book, an emperor with no clothes. After picking my way through pages and pages of self aggrandizing anecdotes it seems to me that the basic theme of the book can be summed up as this: the "experts" used the wrong probability distributions; rare events are still rare, but not *as* rare as had been assumed.
3 cathedralpine Definitely keep reading. But, don't feel bad skimming through pieces that aren't doing it for you. I loved the book, and refer to it still today after reading it years ago. He debunks human behavior and is able to tie in many other industries to his theories which I enjoyed the most.
3 BouncySlumber Thanks for all your help. I pressed on through the second/third chapters, and it does get better (very slowly). I'm going to keep pressing on, but I respect all of your opinions!
2 SmorgasConfigurator First factor is that Taleb has a style of writing that is unique in that he jumps from mythology to anecdote to aggressive statements about the false prophets to very illuminating and intelligent comments. I admit it's hard to reach the latter when the former grows a bit annoying after a while. But I maintain that the fundamental idea is a good one, and in Taleb's later books (I'm thinking Antifragile especially) the concept gets its conclusion and antidote. I'll try to give you a very rough summary of the idea of the Black Swan, which may help guide you through Taleb's tricky style. The *Black Swan* is that event or object that hasn't been previously observed (or at least very rarely), which is outside the range of past data, which furthermore is an event that is of significance. In fact, Taleb argues that many of the historically most significant events are Black Swans, say wars, massive natural disasters, huge stock market crashes, disruptive political elections etc. While that's the case, so much of the quantitative methods of today as applied to social science in particular are in Taleb's view focused and tuned for the common and ordinary, exemplified by the normal distribution. We are therefore lulled into a belief by these methods that things are and will be "normal" or "linear" or "as they always have been before". Ultimately Taleb argues that Black Swans contain an intractable randomness making them nonmeasurable and nonpredictable. So in short, a false belief in that things will be what they always have been emerges. That false belief, which Taleb attributes to many academic and political people with his usual style of anger, leads to that we humans design fragile systems that once faced with that Black Swan event causes terrible damage. In fact, we might even design systems that are more prone to generate Black Swans by adding layers of complexity based on a false certainty. Taleb later ties this into his subsequent concept of the antifragile. One can of course debate how accurate this description is of modern society. However, Taleb offers a challenge, lays out his argument (albeit a bit convoluted) and clearly Bezos thought there was something to it. Plenty debate has been published on this concept after its publication of you're interested.
2 Mods_ConstantlyHatin What you are missing is likely *the majority of the book*, since you just said you’ve only finished the 1st chapter. Why did you pick the book in the first place? And how did the first chapter not align with that motivation?
5 0 theotheredge I guess it's going to be a personal decision. I loved it. Taleb is way too impressed with himself, and that made the book initially hard for me to read. However, if you can ignore his tone, the content of the book is terrific. Solid examples, well explained, with interesting consequences and implications. It's been a while since I read it, but I still think about the chain of events that made me who I am and how none of the most significant were ever planned for or even expected.
3 0 cassiodorus I think the concept of the book is better than his execution in writing it.
5 0 SXNE2 Antifragile is better but you will still be put off by his writing style. You don’t need to read much more than the first few chapters of “The Black Swan” to understand the point. Taleb is obviously very impressed with his own intellect but it wears a bit thin.
6 0 alesserweevil My personal, very much in the minority opinion is that it's a terrible book, an emperor with no clothes. After picking my way through pages and pages of self aggrandizing anecdotes it seems to me that the basic theme of the book can be summed up as this: the "experts" used the wrong probability distributions; rare events are still rare, but not *as* rare as had been assumed.
3 0 cathedralpine Definitely keep reading. But, don't feel bad skimming through pieces that aren't doing it for you. I loved the book, and refer to it still today after reading it years ago. He debunks human behavior and is able to tie in many other industries to his theories which I enjoyed the most.
3 0 BouncySlumber Thanks for all your help. I pressed on through the second/third chapters, and it does get better (very slowly). I'm going to keep pressing on, but I respect all of your opinions!
2 0 SmorgasConfigurator First factor is that Taleb has a style of writing that is unique in that he jumps from mythology to anecdote to aggressive statements about the false prophets to very illuminating and intelligent comments. I admit it's hard to reach the latter when the former grows a bit annoying after a while. But I maintain that the fundamental idea is a good one, and in Taleb's later books (I'm thinking Antifragile especially) the concept gets its conclusion and antidote. I'll try to give you a very rough summary of the idea of the Black Swan, which may help guide you through Taleb's tricky style. The *Black Swan* is that event or object that hasn't been previously observed (or at least very rarely), which is outside the range of past data, which furthermore is an event that is of significance. In fact, Taleb argues that many of the historically most significant events are Black Swans, say wars, massive natural disasters, huge stock market crashes, disruptive political elections etc. While that's the case, so much of the quantitative methods of today as applied to social science in particular are in Taleb's view focused and tuned for the common and ordinary, exemplified by the normal distribution. We are therefore lulled into a belief by these methods that things are and will be "normal" or "linear" or "as they always have been before". Ultimately Taleb argues that Black Swans contain an intractable randomness making them nonmeasurable and nonpredictable. So in short, a false belief in that things will be what they always have been emerges. That false belief, which Taleb attributes to many academic and political people with his usual style of anger, leads to that we humans design fragile systems that once faced with that Black Swan event causes terrible damage. In fact, we might even design systems that are more prone to generate Black Swans by adding layers of complexity based on a false certainty. Taleb later ties this into his subsequent concept of the antifragile. One can of course debate how accurate this description is of modern society. However, Taleb offers a challenge, lays out his argument (albeit a bit convoluted) and clearly Bezos thought there was something to it. Plenty debate has been published on this concept after its publication of you're interested.
2 0 Mods_ConstantlyHatin What you are missing is likely *the majority of the book*, since you just said you’ve only finished the 1st chapter. Why did you pick the book in the first place? And how did the first chapter not align with that motivation?