Score
Title
170
Best Books of 2017 - Results
64
What Books Are You Reading This Week? January 15, 2018
15624
Stephen King aims to help bookstore owner who lost collection in flood
15025
Mike D Says Beastie Boys Memoir Is Coming Out This Year
32
“Fire and Fury” Is on Track to Beat “The Art of the Deal,” Trump’s Own Bestseller
26
For anyone having trouble focusing while reading
19
Cover reveal for Stephen King's Upcoming novel, "The Outsider"
6
Do you take time after a book or dive into another?
16
Peter Mayle, author of A Year in Provence, dies aged 78
28
I've just finished reading Tolstoy's ' 'The Death of Ivan Illyich' and these are my thoughts.
5
What qualifies as a "book"/"novel"
7
Do you think that certain books , genres hold more value than others?
120
Just how bad is your TBR (to-be-read) pile?
15
Well bloody hell! We did it. A 12 month reading quest to rediscover our love for reading.
3
Help with reading Faulkner!
4
John Barton, co-founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, dead at 89
8
Whats your opinion on making notes or underlining in your books?
1
[Opinion] Brave New World + Revisited
6
Just finished reading "Life With Billy" and would really like to discuss it if anyone has read it?
2
What was your experience with Walden by Henry David Thoreau?
16
What percentage of the books you read are written by women/men?
21
Exactly what gets a book banned from prisons, in one US state’s spreadsheet
1
The Catcher in the Rye
1
What is in your head while you are reading? Images? Someone narrating? Ideas? Feelings?
1
Lady Windermere’s Fan, or is it Wilde’s?
0
Which authors do you consider underrated and what are the best works you read from them?
1
JoyceImages - Ulysses illustrated using postcards, photos, and other documents contemporary with the events of the novel.
6
Why was Danglars' letter to the Crown Prosecutor incriminating in the Count of Monte Cristo?
1
Old Russian scientific and religious books are now in my possession...
12
the winter brings out the reader in me again
10
best new science books released this winter
24
This might be a stupid question but how are you guys able to read while commuting?
19566
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Making a memory that will last forever.
4
An interesting insider’s perspective on ‘the blurb’
9
Thoughts on novellas in comparison to novels.
3
I'm reading The Natural for class, and something has been bugging the hell out of me. [SPOILERS]
8
5 things to know about Murakami's Killing Commendatore
396
Original Stephen King Manuscripts Destroyed After Water Main Breaks in Downtown Bangor
8
Lupita Nyong’o to Publish a Children’s Book.
63
Required Reading
25
What books changed you?
2
The Literature of Bad Sex
8 nona31 I totally agree with you. I have given up on reading some of the literary journal articles and those on some literary sites for just that reason. Is there a solution to the bias? I doubt it.
8 CroweMorningstar Literature is often geared towards social commentary. There's been a lot of political upheaval lately, and a lot of it is centered around the US. Comes with the territory of being one of the most influential nations in the world. Writers want to express their opinions about it through literature.
8 moogietried American literary magazines have almost always been political. Literary magazines are not only there to provide reviews, but to explain in depth the context within which literature is birthed and brought to fruition. Even if the publications themselves try to remain out of the arena, like the Paris Review, the people behind them are still humans with political ideals and beliefs that influence the direction of their work. [Here's the table of contents from a 1963 issue of NYRB.](http://www.nybooks.com/issues/1963/02/01/) [The Paris Review actually explained its turn towards more explicit political writing in this article.](https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/06/13/politics-and-the-paris-review-announcing-our-summer-issue/) I think what you're seeing is the effect of a particularly divisive moment in American political history making its way into the general zeitgeist, where it was once only the concern of wonks and conspiracy theorists. People are spooked. With regards to the America-centric reporting, I think that has to do with many of these periodicals being American.
3 phytozap I agree with your observation, but unfortunately I don't have a solution to offer. (Sometimes I feel as if all reviewers and bloggers were taught the same formula of a tie-in lede about contemporary politics or pop culture, however forced and tangential, just to hook the reader--as if they couldn't trust that readers of a literary periodical had sufficient interest in books for their own sake.) Outside the United States, can you recommend any literary periodicals that don't keep injecting politics, preferably ones that focus on English-language books?
-4 therealbobsteel They are all like that. It isn't so much the focus on politics as the focus is always the same, only one point of view allowed or you are banished. There is no escape, and that's how the left likes it.
9 0 nona31 I totally agree with you. I have given up on reading some of the literary journal articles and those on some literary sites for just that reason. Is there a solution to the bias? I doubt it.
8 0 CroweMorningstar Literature is often geared towards social commentary. There's been a lot of political upheaval lately, and a lot of it is centered around the US. Comes with the territory of being one of the most influential nations in the world. Writers want to express their opinions about it through literature.
5 0 moogietried American literary magazines have almost always been political. Literary magazines are not only there to provide reviews, but to explain in depth the context within which literature is birthed and brought to fruition. Even if the publications themselves try to remain out of the arena, like the Paris Review, the people behind them are still humans with political ideals and beliefs that influence the direction of their work. [Here's the table of contents from a 1963 issue of NYRB.](http://www.nybooks.com/issues/1963/02/01/) [The Paris Review actually explained its turn towards more explicit political writing in this article.](https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/06/13/politics-and-the-paris-review-announcing-our-summer-issue/) I think what you're seeing is the effect of a particularly divisive moment in American political history making its way into the general zeitgeist, where it was once only the concern of wonks and conspiracy theorists. People are spooked. With regards to the America-centric reporting, I think that has to do with many of these periodicals being American.
4 0 phytozap I agree with your observation, but unfortunately I don't have a solution to offer. (Sometimes I feel as if all reviewers and bloggers were taught the same formula of a tie-in lede about contemporary politics or pop culture, however forced and tangential, just to hook the reader--as if they couldn't trust that readers of a literary periodical had sufficient interest in books for their own sake.) Outside the United States, can you recommend any literary periodicals that don't keep injecting politics, preferably ones that focus on English-language books?
-6 0 therealbobsteel They are all like that. It isn't so much the focus on politics as the focus is always the same, only one point of view allowed or you are banished. There is no escape, and that's how the left likes it.