Score
Title
170
Best Books of 2017 - Results
64
What Books Are You Reading This Week? January 15, 2018
15624
Stephen King aims to help bookstore owner who lost collection in flood
15025
Mike D Says Beastie Boys Memoir Is Coming Out This Year
32
“Fire and Fury” Is on Track to Beat “The Art of the Deal,” Trump’s Own Bestseller
26
For anyone having trouble focusing while reading
19
Cover reveal for Stephen King's Upcoming novel, "The Outsider"
6
Do you take time after a book or dive into another?
16
Peter Mayle, author of A Year in Provence, dies aged 78
28
I've just finished reading Tolstoy's ' 'The Death of Ivan Illyich' and these are my thoughts.
5
What qualifies as a "book"/"novel"
7
Do you think that certain books , genres hold more value than others?
120
Just how bad is your TBR (to-be-read) pile?
15
Well bloody hell! We did it. A 12 month reading quest to rediscover our love for reading.
3
Help with reading Faulkner!
4
John Barton, co-founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, dead at 89
8
Whats your opinion on making notes or underlining in your books?
1
[Opinion] Brave New World + Revisited
6
Just finished reading "Life With Billy" and would really like to discuss it if anyone has read it?
2
What was your experience with Walden by Henry David Thoreau?
16
What percentage of the books you read are written by women/men?
21
Exactly what gets a book banned from prisons, in one US state’s spreadsheet
1
The Catcher in the Rye
1
What is in your head while you are reading? Images? Someone narrating? Ideas? Feelings?
1
Lady Windermere’s Fan, or is it Wilde’s?
0
Which authors do you consider underrated and what are the best works you read from them?
1
JoyceImages - Ulysses illustrated using postcards, photos, and other documents contemporary with the events of the novel.
6
Why was Danglars' letter to the Crown Prosecutor incriminating in the Count of Monte Cristo?
1
Old Russian scientific and religious books are now in my possession...
12
the winter brings out the reader in me again
10
best new science books released this winter
24
This might be a stupid question but how are you guys able to read while commuting?
19566
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Making a memory that will last forever.
4
An interesting insider’s perspective on ‘the blurb’
9
Thoughts on novellas in comparison to novels.
3
I'm reading The Natural for class, and something has been bugging the hell out of me. [SPOILERS]
8
5 things to know about Murakami's Killing Commendatore
396
Original Stephen King Manuscripts Destroyed After Water Main Breaks in Downtown Bangor
8
Lupita Nyong’o to Publish a Children’s Book.
63
Required Reading
25
What books changed you?
2
The Literature of Bad Sex
14 LieutenantKije I like funny memoirs, like Bossypants and Yes Please and Modern Romance. It’s awesome (and even funnier) getting to hear them read by the comedians themselves and it can be as low effort as you want - if you miss a few details it won’t affect the overall understanding. Plus goofy jokes are totally what I need at the end of a long day.
7 sylvezine I avoid audiobooks written with a lot of fluffy flowery language describing sunsets in detail and stuff. Adjective rich audiobooks are not great. I find Orson Scott Cards 'Enders Game' series to be a good as audiobooks. He comes from a theater background so focuses more on dialogue. That's probably the key right there: dialogue over description. Game of Thrones is a really good audiobook series. The narrator is amazing. Simplistic writing styles are good too. Like 'Mr. Penumbras 24 Hour Bookstore' and 'Ready Player One'. Hope that helps.
3 kerpti I only listen to audiobooks that are non-fiction stories/biographies recorded by the author. So far I've only listened to a couple books by actors such as Aziz Ansari's book Modern Romance, Amy Poehler's book, etc. Though, the Martian worked perfectly in this format, as well. Anything that's more people talking to me first person through the audio rather than somebody trying to describe a landscape, tell a story from someone else's eyes, etc. is what I have no problem listening to. The same way I can listen to This American Life for a couple hours no problem, I can listen to these types of books on audible. Anything fiction or anything with really flowery writing, I just can't.
3 Cyprinodon_Martius World War Z. The cast for the complete edition is extremely talented (including such greats as Mark Hamil, Simon Pegg, Alan Alda and **MARTIN SCORSESE**), and the diversity on show really does make the epidemic feel global. I'd love for someone to provide an animation alongside it, to make up for the movie!
2 shillyshally First off, if you have the ebook version you can get the Audible version for way less than just buying the Audible version from Amazon. It's called Matchmaker and you can listen to a sample so that should help you decide. I have one audio book where the reader uses a thick accent and it was a poor choice. That was the only version I found less than excellent. Also, there are a number of volunteer reads available and you can listen to them before hand. I listen mostly to non-fiction as I am going to sleep and I just rewind until I have gotten through the chapter and understand it. For what you are talking about, maybe mysteries or more light fare might be ideal. I recommend Razor Girl by Carl Hiaasen. It's very funny and easy to follow.
2 PerilousAll I like mystery/suspense for audio. I went through Nevada Barr's entire Anna Pigeon series (19 books!) and have started on Lisa Gardner's DD Warren series. Both are light on sex scenes, which is a plus when listening in public or while driving. Having a familiar character book to book is . . . comforting? I'm not too hard on myself for mentally drifting while I listen. It's a pastime, not something I'll be tested on.
2 R0binSage I've listened to some of the official Star Wars audiobooks and they are full of music and sound effects. They're great.
2 Infvo986 I like action/ sci-fi fluff for commutes. Anything that you can pretty much guess the last minute or two of if you get distracted works great. Zombie apocalypse stuff is really good because its all the same stuff. I also listen while I work, and that is more of a historical, nonfiction time, for me, anyway.
2 osidebirdman90 **Fahrenheit 451** read by actor Tim Robbins (Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River) was a fun treat.
1 Shogun11B If you haven't read them yet (and are into dragons), the Game of Thrones books work great in audiobook format. Has a sitting-around-the-fire vibe, which works with the content.
1 shezka_foxe I'd highly suggest you listen to Sea of Rust as an audiobook. It's about AI's that take over the Earth (I know that sounds so generic, but trust me it's better then I make it sound.) The person who reads it does such a great job of giving each character a voice and the language isn't too over the top. Strict and to the point, but performed so well it's tempted me to go back and listen to it a second time.
1 Shm2000 Novels that are not too complex and that don't have too many characters. Books that don't require or benefit from frequent re-reading of passages ("Who was that guy again?"). Depends on the book, too. I listened to A Man Called Ove and the narrator's cadence and tone made it awesome; better than reading it, I imagine.
1 alesserweevil Try plays, which are meant to be listened to, and work well when driving etc. A starter suggestion would be the plays of David Mamet, well known for his dialogue.
1 HailMantaur Anything read by Tim Curry.
1 iheartcookin Long serials are great to listen to when you find a great reader (or readers) you’ll want to listen to them for many hours. The Wheel of Time books are an example. Anything read by Scott Brick is also great.
0 OwlHawkins Genealogies.
14 0 LieutenantKije I like funny memoirs, like Bossypants and Yes Please and Modern Romance. It’s awesome (and even funnier) getting to hear them read by the comedians themselves and it can be as low effort as you want - if you miss a few details it won’t affect the overall understanding. Plus goofy jokes are totally what I need at the end of a long day.
8 0 sylvezine I avoid audiobooks written with a lot of fluffy flowery language describing sunsets in detail and stuff. Adjective rich audiobooks are not great. I find Orson Scott Cards 'Enders Game' series to be a good as audiobooks. He comes from a theater background so focuses more on dialogue. That's probably the key right there: dialogue over description. Game of Thrones is a really good audiobook series. The narrator is amazing. Simplistic writing styles are good too. Like 'Mr. Penumbras 24 Hour Bookstore' and 'Ready Player One'. Hope that helps.
3 0 kerpti I only listen to audiobooks that are non-fiction stories/biographies recorded by the author. So far I've only listened to a couple books by actors such as Aziz Ansari's book Modern Romance, Amy Poehler's book, etc. Though, the Martian worked perfectly in this format, as well. Anything that's more people talking to me first person through the audio rather than somebody trying to describe a landscape, tell a story from someone else's eyes, etc. is what I have no problem listening to. The same way I can listen to This American Life for a couple hours no problem, I can listen to these types of books on audible. Anything fiction or anything with really flowery writing, I just can't.
3 0 Cyprinodon_Martius World War Z. The cast for the complete edition is extremely talented (including such greats as Mark Hamil, Simon Pegg, Alan Alda and **MARTIN SCORSESE**), and the diversity on show really does make the epidemic feel global. I'd love for someone to provide an animation alongside it, to make up for the movie!
2 0 shillyshally First off, if you have the ebook version you can get the Audible version for way less than just buying the Audible version from Amazon. It's called Matchmaker and you can listen to a sample so that should help you decide. I have one audio book where the reader uses a thick accent and it was a poor choice. That was the only version I found less than excellent. Also, there are a number of volunteer reads available and you can listen to them before hand. I listen mostly to non-fiction as I am going to sleep and I just rewind until I have gotten through the chapter and understand it. For what you are talking about, maybe mysteries or more light fare might be ideal. I recommend Razor Girl by Carl Hiaasen. It's very funny and easy to follow.
2 0 PerilousAll I like mystery/suspense for audio. I went through Nevada Barr's entire Anna Pigeon series (19 books!) and have started on Lisa Gardner's DD Warren series. Both are light on sex scenes, which is a plus when listening in public or while driving. Having a familiar character book to book is . . . comforting? I'm not too hard on myself for mentally drifting while I listen. It's a pastime, not something I'll be tested on.
2 0 R0binSage I've listened to some of the official Star Wars audiobooks and they are full of music and sound effects. They're great.
2 0 Infvo986 I like action/ sci-fi fluff for commutes. Anything that you can pretty much guess the last minute or two of if you get distracted works great. Zombie apocalypse stuff is really good because its all the same stuff. I also listen while I work, and that is more of a historical, nonfiction time, for me, anyway.
2 0 osidebirdman90 **Fahrenheit 451** read by actor Tim Robbins (Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River) was a fun treat.
1 0 Shogun11B If you haven't read them yet (and are into dragons), the Game of Thrones books work great in audiobook format. Has a sitting-around-the-fire vibe, which works with the content.
1 0 shezka_foxe I'd highly suggest you listen to Sea of Rust as an audiobook. It's about AI's that take over the Earth (I know that sounds so generic, but trust me it's better then I make it sound.) The person who reads it does such a great job of giving each character a voice and the language isn't too over the top. Strict and to the point, but performed so well it's tempted me to go back and listen to it a second time.
1 0 Shm2000 Novels that are not too complex and that don't have too many characters. Books that don't require or benefit from frequent re-reading of passages ("Who was that guy again?"). Depends on the book, too. I listened to A Man Called Ove and the narrator's cadence and tone made it awesome; better than reading it, I imagine.
1 0 alesserweevil Try plays, which are meant to be listened to, and work well when driving etc. A starter suggestion would be the plays of David Mamet, well known for his dialogue.
1 0 HailMantaur Anything read by Tim Curry.
1 0 iheartcookin Long serials are great to listen to when you find a great reader (or readers) you’ll want to listen to them for many hours. The Wheel of Time books are an example. Anything read by Scott Brick is also great.
0 0 OwlHawkins Genealogies.