Score
Title
144
The /r/books book club selection for April is The Boy on the Bridge by M.R. Carey
9
Simple Questions: April 21, 2018
6093
Not too long ago, I finished Dreams From my Father by Barack Obama. I found it to be an incredibly powerful, humanizing portrait of our 44th president
54
The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
5766
The 100 best one-star Amazon Reviews of The Great Gatsby
17
Keeping books in a windowsill?
29
A curious incident of the dog in the night time
85
Just read a Higher Loyalty, by former FBI director James Comey.
10
The meanest things Vladimir Nabokov said about other writers
4
I just finished reading The Girl On The Train
4
For those of you who have read The Neapolitan Novels, how true are they to women's friendships?
7
'Beyond the Beats': Rock's greatest drummers share their craft in book
156
Which classic is being described by this 1 star review?
13
I read Factfullness by Hans Rosling and it's like an antidote to the "always bad news all the time" epidemic
40
Voice in head while reading
68
"America’s 100 most-loved novels" as chosen in a Survey from PBS for their "The Great American Read" Series
8
Amazing book series you should all read! John Marsden - Tomorrow, when the war began.
5
After 3 decades... science fiction...
10
My thoughts on The Catcher in the Rye
0
Dan Brown's Inferno movie adaptation? (SPOILERS)
2
Los Angeles Times book prizes awarded to literary veterans, emerging authors
5
Inferno by Dan Brown
9
What are some less obvious books that would make great movies, and why?
10
The illusion of time. Andrew Jaffe probes Carlo Rovelli’s study arguing that physics deconstructs our sense of time.
35
Just read Rosemary's Baby while pregnant with my son
11
What books have you read just because you've seen it and thought "what the hell"? Were they any good?
15
How Flap Illustrations Helped Reveal the Body’s Inner Secrets: Sixteenth century scholars peeled away anatomical ignorance one layer at a time.
10542
This Adorable Book Store In Toronto Has A Vending Machine That Gives Out Rare Books
15
What was the last book you rage-quit?
2
Library of America Editions
227
The Vonnegut Universe
0
The Overstory by Richard Powers seems to be another overlooked book by a massively underrated writer.
2
Sympathy for the Devil
11
What book have you (re)read as an adult that makes you think, "This is a kids' book!?"
4
How do you "visualize" books that are more literary and focus on style/prose/thematic depth?
11
Kevin Kwan, author of Crazy Rich Asians, was named one of Time Magazine's Top 100 Influential People of 2018!
12
The Sublime Cluelessness of Throwing Lavish Great Gatsby Parties- The article I revisit whenever someone brings up the Great Gatsby
2
Fierce Kingdom - phew
12
Swedish Academy, which picks the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, acknowledged on Friday that names of some previous prize winners had been leaked in advance and it pledged to redraw the ancient rules governing how it functions.
2
Where do I buy Chinese books in the US
9
Can we talk about the Glory of John Steinbeck?
0
Is there something wrong with the way I read books?
14 MimeticSemiotic Louis Sachar - Holes. Made me wonder why I wasn't eating raw onions and digging holes in the desert all day. Fast-forward a few years and I actually tried digging a 5 feet wide- 5 feet deep hole in solid ground, with the help of a friend. Made me re-think some things about my life; and also, definitely not as easy as it sounds in the book.
8 alexmhuard The catcher in the rye
7 atheistmom42 The Bell Jar- Sylvia Plath
8 cheddarmitelyfe The Perks of Being a Wallflower. It was very appropriate for my life when I read it.
5 SmallEfforts I really wanted to say Brave New World, but dang. So, I’m going to go with Tuesday’s With Morrie. The book itself is nothing to write home about and is pretty standard writing. But the reason it made me rethink my whole life is because in grade 12 my English teacher had us do a large section of a semester just on this book. And while he read it out loud to us he would stop and bring up topics for him to discuss with us that relate to the book. We were a room full of grade 12 students in our first semester and in our final year of high school. Then was the perfect time to use that book to discuss life the way he did and bring up things people neglect to even think about. The wisdom he shared with us and realizations he made each individual student have is something that I’ll only grow more grateful for as time goes on. My teacher made that class so amazing and I’ll never forget him, the book, or my classmates who went from being just angsty teenagers to a group of close 17-18 year olds all coming to terms that *this is life, and it is what you make of it*, and that we’re all a lot more alike than we’ll ever admit. Our final project for the book was to write journal entries on the topics discussed in class. The following are just a few of the discussions I wrote about and handed in. - are doctors still emotionally affected when it’s required of them to tell a patient that they’re going to die - How do you know when you’ve found the one - the quote of “Friends for a season, friends for a reason and friends for a lifetime” - if you were given the choice to know when you were going to die, would you take it? - “What’s stopping you from saying ‘I love you’ to the people that you love?” - do you want to be buried or cremated? I went deep in those journal responses. Poured my heart out, and in the process learned what my values are and what it is that I want to get out of life. I still need to buy a copy of the book for myself. Thinking of going back and having him sign it.
5 -DarkStarrx His Dark Materials totally changed my views on life and death. It helped me a lot in facing my fears of death. Hands down one of the best trilogies I've ever come across.
9 ratherreadabook 1984, Orson Wells. Deactivated FB after that.
8 elphie93 **The Diary of Anne Frank**. I read it when I was about 13 and it completely changed my perspective on my life and made me think about how lucky I was. I also ended up majoring in history with a primary focus on WWII in university and that book definitely set me on that path.
4 ferrettamer Le Petit Prince, it's like The Little Prince but French. I don't think I've ever had a book made me rethink my life tbh, maybe it's cause I've only lived like a quarter of it or maybe it's cause I don't read the books properly.
3 OgreLord Not one book, but the 6 Dune books written by Frank Herbert
3 LogicAndSocrates nicomachean ethics by Aristotle
4 amgov *The Secret History*. I read it when my religious faith was waning. Doubts were creeping in, but I had experienced religious ecstasy and this, to me, was proof that there was a God. Then when I read *The Secret History*, and learned about bacchanalia and went down a Wikipedia rabbit-hole about religious ecstatic experiences. That severed the final thread for me.
2 FragWall *Vineland*; and *V.*; both by Thomas Pynchon.
2 osidebirdman90 **Fool’s Errand** by Scott Horton It’s about the never-ending war in Afghanistan. Thoroughly researched and cited. It’s obviously a nonfiction, but Scott wrote it really well. It’ll turn your previous thoughts on the Middle East and America’s involvement upside down. Scott Horton is vetted on foreign policy with over 4,000 recorded interviews under his belt, a podcast, editing antiwar.com and other projects. I admire his work greatly.
2 Shef_eel Although I did really like the hunger games, it surprises me to see it on top. My pick would be elementary particles / atomised by Michel Houellebecq. I think it made me more understanding of other peoples motives and ideas, as well as less emotionally instable and naive.
2 Lizosaurous Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
2 DanLewisFW The narrative of Frederick Douglas. Really opened my eyes about a lot of things. I always knew slavery was evil but it was really interesting to read what it did even to the Slave holders. So many lessons in that book.
2 thegirlwholeft Animal Farm - George Orwell Not just my life but the society as a whole, and my place in it. It's a short novel (less than 100 pages) but I think it's great.
2 anchor214 Thousand Spendid Sun, 1984
1 tk_020 The places in between by Rory Stewart For those out there who are close minded it will open you. For those who are open minded it will just be a great reinforcement.
1 freephiddy The Good Earth by Pearl Buck and The Death of a Salesman both left me thinking for a while.
1 StevieSz Follow the River by James Alexander Thom
1 hello_sweatpants Heart of Darkness. Definitely changed the way I see the world in that it highlighted the immense impact of colonialism.
1 cyberine Not a book but Gaiman’s the Sandman did it for me
1 shezka_foxe The Defining Decade by Meg Jay, in it the author talks about how important the twenties are in a person's life. They talk about how they've dealt with people who made mistakes in their twenties and ended up paying for it later or wished they'd worked harder when they were younger. There was a lot of solid advice that made me start to re-hash aspects of my life and where I'm investing my free time. She even goes over relationships during this time in a person's life and shares the stories of people who are in their early or mid-twenties and how they started to work on turning their lives around to accomplish their goals. I ended up reading it because it was recommended in another thread about a year ago about books people had wished they had read early on in their adulthood.
13 0 MimeticSemiotic Louis Sachar - Holes. Made me wonder why I wasn't eating raw onions and digging holes in the desert all day. Fast-forward a few years and I actually tried digging a 5 feet wide- 5 feet deep hole in solid ground, with the help of a friend. Made me re-think some things about my life; and also, definitely not as easy as it sounds in the book.
9 0 alexmhuard The catcher in the rye
8 0 atheistmom42 The Bell Jar- Sylvia Plath
8 0 cheddarmitelyfe The Perks of Being a Wallflower. It was very appropriate for my life when I read it.
7 0 SmallEfforts I really wanted to say Brave New World, but dang. So, I’m going to go with Tuesday’s With Morrie. The book itself is nothing to write home about and is pretty standard writing. But the reason it made me rethink my whole life is because in grade 12 my English teacher had us do a large section of a semester just on this book. And while he read it out loud to us he would stop and bring up topics for him to discuss with us that relate to the book. We were a room full of grade 12 students in our first semester and in our final year of high school. Then was the perfect time to use that book to discuss life the way he did and bring up things people neglect to even think about. The wisdom he shared with us and realizations he made each individual student have is something that I’ll only grow more grateful for as time goes on. My teacher made that class so amazing and I’ll never forget him, the book, or my classmates who went from being just angsty teenagers to a group of close 17-18 year olds all coming to terms that *this is life, and it is what you make of it*, and that we’re all a lot more alike than we’ll ever admit. Our final project for the book was to write journal entries on the topics discussed in class. The following are just a few of the discussions I wrote about and handed in. - are doctors still emotionally affected when it’s required of them to tell a patient that they’re going to die - How do you know when you’ve found the one - the quote of “Friends for a season, friends for a reason and friends for a lifetime” - if you were given the choice to know when you were going to die, would you take it? - “What’s stopping you from saying ‘I love you’ to the people that you love?” - do you want to be buried or cremated? I went deep in those journal responses. Poured my heart out, and in the process learned what my values are and what it is that I want to get out of life. I still need to buy a copy of the book for myself. Thinking of going back and having him sign it.
6 0 -DarkStarrx His Dark Materials totally changed my views on life and death. It helped me a lot in facing my fears of death. Hands down one of the best trilogies I've ever come across.
9 0 ratherreadabook 1984, Orson Wells. Deactivated FB after that.
7 0 elphie93 **The Diary of Anne Frank**. I read it when I was about 13 and it completely changed my perspective on my life and made me think about how lucky I was. I also ended up majoring in history with a primary focus on WWII in university and that book definitely set me on that path.
4 0 ferrettamer Le Petit Prince, it's like The Little Prince but French. I don't think I've ever had a book made me rethink my life tbh, maybe it's cause I've only lived like a quarter of it or maybe it's cause I don't read the books properly.
3 0 OgreLord Not one book, but the 6 Dune books written by Frank Herbert
3 0 LogicAndSocrates nicomachean ethics by Aristotle
4 0 amgov *The Secret History*. I read it when my religious faith was waning. Doubts were creeping in, but I had experienced religious ecstasy and this, to me, was proof that there was a God. Then when I read *The Secret History*, and learned about bacchanalia and went down a Wikipedia rabbit-hole about religious ecstatic experiences. That severed the final thread for me.
2 0 FragWall *Vineland*; and *V.*; both by Thomas Pynchon.
2 0 osidebirdman90 **Fool’s Errand** by Scott Horton It’s about the never-ending war in Afghanistan. Thoroughly researched and cited. It’s obviously a nonfiction, but Scott wrote it really well. It’ll turn your previous thoughts on the Middle East and America’s involvement upside down. Scott Horton is vetted on foreign policy with over 4,000 recorded interviews under his belt, a podcast, editing antiwar.com and other projects. I admire his work greatly.
2 0 Shef_eel Although I did really like the hunger games, it surprises me to see it on top. My pick would be elementary particles / atomised by Michel Houellebecq. I think it made me more understanding of other peoples motives and ideas, as well as less emotionally instable and naive.
2 0 Lizosaurous Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
2 0 DanLewisFW The narrative of Frederick Douglas. Really opened my eyes about a lot of things. I always knew slavery was evil but it was really interesting to read what it did even to the Slave holders. So many lessons in that book.
2 0 thegirlwholeft Animal Farm - George Orwell Not just my life but the society as a whole, and my place in it. It's a short novel (less than 100 pages) but I think it's great.
2 0 anchor214 Thousand Spendid Sun, 1984
1 0 tk_020 The places in between by Rory Stewart For those out there who are close minded it will open you. For those who are open minded it will just be a great reinforcement.
1 0 freephiddy The Good Earth by Pearl Buck and The Death of a Salesman both left me thinking for a while.
1 0 StevieSz Follow the River by James Alexander Thom
1 0 hello_sweatpants Heart of Darkness. Definitely changed the way I see the world in that it highlighted the immense impact of colonialism.
1 0 cyberine Not a book but Gaiman’s the Sandman did it for me
1 0 shezka_foxe The Defining Decade by Meg Jay, in it the author talks about how important the twenties are in a person's life. They talk about how they've dealt with people who made mistakes in their twenties and ended up paying for it later or wished they'd worked harder when they were younger. There was a lot of solid advice that made me start to re-hash aspects of my life and where I'm investing my free time. She even goes over relationships during this time in a person's life and shares the stories of people who are in their early or mid-twenties and how they started to work on turning their lives around to accomplish their goals. I ended up reading it because it was recommended in another thread about a year ago about books people had wished they had read early on in their adulthood.