Score
Title
170
Best Books of 2017 - Results
64
What Books Are You Reading This Week? January 15, 2018
15624
Stephen King aims to help bookstore owner who lost collection in flood
15025
Mike D Says Beastie Boys Memoir Is Coming Out This Year
32
“Fire and Fury” Is on Track to Beat “The Art of the Deal,” Trump’s Own Bestseller
26
For anyone having trouble focusing while reading
19
Cover reveal for Stephen King's Upcoming novel, "The Outsider"
6
Do you take time after a book or dive into another?
16
Peter Mayle, author of A Year in Provence, dies aged 78
28
I've just finished reading Tolstoy's ' 'The Death of Ivan Illyich' and these are my thoughts.
5
What qualifies as a "book"/"novel"
7
Do you think that certain books , genres hold more value than others?
120
Just how bad is your TBR (to-be-read) pile?
15
Well bloody hell! We did it. A 12 month reading quest to rediscover our love for reading.
3
Help with reading Faulkner!
4
John Barton, co-founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, dead at 89
8
Whats your opinion on making notes or underlining in your books?
1
[Opinion] Brave New World + Revisited
6
Just finished reading "Life With Billy" and would really like to discuss it if anyone has read it?
2
What was your experience with Walden by Henry David Thoreau?
16
What percentage of the books you read are written by women/men?
21
Exactly what gets a book banned from prisons, in one US state’s spreadsheet
1
The Catcher in the Rye
1
What is in your head while you are reading? Images? Someone narrating? Ideas? Feelings?
1
Lady Windermere’s Fan, or is it Wilde’s?
0
Which authors do you consider underrated and what are the best works you read from them?
1
JoyceImages - Ulysses illustrated using postcards, photos, and other documents contemporary with the events of the novel.
6
Why was Danglars' letter to the Crown Prosecutor incriminating in the Count of Monte Cristo?
1
Old Russian scientific and religious books are now in my possession...
12
the winter brings out the reader in me again
10
best new science books released this winter
24
This might be a stupid question but how are you guys able to read while commuting?
19566
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Making a memory that will last forever.
4
An interesting insider’s perspective on ‘the blurb’
9
Thoughts on novellas in comparison to novels.
3
I'm reading The Natural for class, and something has been bugging the hell out of me. [SPOILERS]
8
5 things to know about Murakami's Killing Commendatore
396
Original Stephen King Manuscripts Destroyed After Water Main Breaks in Downtown Bangor
8
Lupita Nyong’o to Publish a Children’s Book.
63
Required Reading
25
What books changed you?
2
The Literature of Bad Sex
14 MimeticSemiotic Louis Sachar - Holes. Made me wonder why I wasn't eating raw onions and digging holes in the desert all day. Fast-forward a few years and I actually tried digging a 5 feet wide- 5 feet deep hole in solid ground, with the help of a friend. Made me re-think some things about my life; and also, definitely not as easy as it sounds in the book.
9 alexmhuard The catcher in the rye
8 cheddarmitelyfe The Perks of Being a Wallflower. It was very appropriate for my life when I read it.
7 atheistmom42 The Bell Jar- Sylvia Plath
5 SmallEfforts I really wanted to say Brave New World, but dang. So, I’m going to go with Tuesday’s With Morrie. The book itself is nothing to write home about and is pretty standard writing. But the reason it made me rethink my whole life is because in grade 12 my English teacher had us do a large section of a semester just on this book. And while he read it out loud to us he would stop and bring up topics for him to discuss with us that relate to the book. We were a room full of grade 12 students in our first semester and in our final year of high school. Then was the perfect time to use that book to discuss life the way he did and bring up things people neglect to even think about. The wisdom he shared with us and realizations he made each individual student have is something that I’ll only grow more grateful for as time goes on. My teacher made that class so amazing and I’ll never forget him, the book, or my classmates who went from being just angsty teenagers to a group of close 17-18 year olds all coming to terms that *this is life, and it is what you make of it*, and that we’re all a lot more alike than we’ll ever admit. Our final project for the book was to write journal entries on the topics discussed in class. The following are just a few of the discussions I wrote about and handed in. - are doctors still emotionally affected when it’s required of them to tell a patient that they’re going to die - How do you know when you’ve found the one - the quote of “Friends for a season, friends for a reason and friends for a lifetime” - if you were given the choice to know when you were going to die, would you take it? - “What’s stopping you from saying ‘I love you’ to the people that you love?” - do you want to be buried or cremated? I went deep in those journal responses. Poured my heart out, and in the process learned what my values are and what it is that I want to get out of life. I still need to buy a copy of the book for myself. Thinking of going back and having him sign it.
4 -DarkStarrx His Dark Materials totally changed my views on life and death. It helped me a lot in facing my fears of death. Hands down one of the best trilogies I've ever come across.
7 elphie93 **The Diary of Anne Frank**. I read it when I was about 13 and it completely changed my perspective on my life and made me think about how lucky I was. I also ended up majoring in history with a primary focus on WWII in university and that book definitely set me on that path.
7 ratherreadabook 1984, Orson Wells. Deactivated FB after that.
3 OgreLord Not one book, but the 6 Dune books written by Frank Herbert
3 ferrettamer Le Petit Prince, it's like The Little Prince but French. I don't think I've ever had a book made me rethink my life tbh, maybe it's cause I've only lived like a quarter of it or maybe it's cause I don't read the books properly.
3 LogicAndSocrates nicomachean ethics by Aristotle
4 amgov *The Secret History*. I read it when my religious faith was waning. Doubts were creeping in, but I had experienced religious ecstasy and this, to me, was proof that there was a God. Then when I read *The Secret History*, and learned about bacchanalia and went down a Wikipedia rabbit-hole about religious ecstatic experiences. That severed the final thread for me.
2 FragWall *Vineland*; and *V.*; both by Thomas Pynchon.
2 osidebirdman90 **Fool’s Errand** by Scott Horton It’s about the never-ending war in Afghanistan. Thoroughly researched and cited. It’s obviously a nonfiction, but Scott wrote it really well. It’ll turn your previous thoughts on the Middle East and America’s involvement upside down. Scott Horton is vetted on foreign policy with over 4,000 recorded interviews under his belt, a podcast, editing antiwar.com and other projects. I admire his work greatly.
2 Shef_eel Although I did really like the hunger games, it surprises me to see it on top. My pick would be elementary particles / atomised by Michel Houellebecq. I think it made me more understanding of other peoples motives and ideas, as well as less emotionally instable and naive.
2 Lizosaurous Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
2 DanLewisFW The narrative of Frederick Douglas. Really opened my eyes about a lot of things. I always knew slavery was evil but it was really interesting to read what it did even to the Slave holders. So many lessons in that book.
1 tk_020 The places in between by Rory Stewart For those out there who are close minded it will open you. For those who are open minded it will just be a great reinforcement.
1 freephiddy The Good Earth by Pearl Buck and The Death of a Salesman both left me thinking for a while.
1 StevieSz Follow the River by James Alexander Thom
1 hello_sweatpants Heart of Darkness. Definitely changed the way I see the world in that it highlighted the immense impact of colonialism.
1 cyberine Not a book but Gaiman’s the Sandman did it for me
1 shezka_foxe The Defining Decade by Meg Jay, in it the author talks about how important the twenties are in a person's life. They talk about how they've dealt with people who made mistakes in their twenties and ended up paying for it later or wished they'd worked harder when they were younger. There was a lot of solid advice that made me start to re-hash aspects of my life and where I'm investing my free time. She even goes over relationships during this time in a person's life and shares the stories of people who are in their early or mid-twenties and how they started to work on turning their lives around to accomplish their goals. I ended up reading it because it was recommended in another thread about a year ago about books people had wished they had read early on in their adulthood.
1 thegirlwholeft Animal Farm - George Orwell Not just my life but the society as a whole, and my place in it. It's a short novel (less than 100 pages) but I think it's great.
1 anchor214 Thousand Spendid Sun, 1984
13 0 MimeticSemiotic Louis Sachar - Holes. Made me wonder why I wasn't eating raw onions and digging holes in the desert all day. Fast-forward a few years and I actually tried digging a 5 feet wide- 5 feet deep hole in solid ground, with the help of a friend. Made me re-think some things about my life; and also, definitely not as easy as it sounds in the book.
9 0 alexmhuard The catcher in the rye
8 0 cheddarmitelyfe The Perks of Being a Wallflower. It was very appropriate for my life when I read it.
8 0 atheistmom42 The Bell Jar- Sylvia Plath
5 0 SmallEfforts I really wanted to say Brave New World, but dang. So, I’m going to go with Tuesday’s With Morrie. The book itself is nothing to write home about and is pretty standard writing. But the reason it made me rethink my whole life is because in grade 12 my English teacher had us do a large section of a semester just on this book. And while he read it out loud to us he would stop and bring up topics for him to discuss with us that relate to the book. We were a room full of grade 12 students in our first semester and in our final year of high school. Then was the perfect time to use that book to discuss life the way he did and bring up things people neglect to even think about. The wisdom he shared with us and realizations he made each individual student have is something that I’ll only grow more grateful for as time goes on. My teacher made that class so amazing and I’ll never forget him, the book, or my classmates who went from being just angsty teenagers to a group of close 17-18 year olds all coming to terms that *this is life, and it is what you make of it*, and that we’re all a lot more alike than we’ll ever admit. Our final project for the book was to write journal entries on the topics discussed in class. The following are just a few of the discussions I wrote about and handed in. - are doctors still emotionally affected when it’s required of them to tell a patient that they’re going to die - How do you know when you’ve found the one - the quote of “Friends for a season, friends for a reason and friends for a lifetime” - if you were given the choice to know when you were going to die, would you take it? - “What’s stopping you from saying ‘I love you’ to the people that you love?” - do you want to be buried or cremated? I went deep in those journal responses. Poured my heart out, and in the process learned what my values are and what it is that I want to get out of life. I still need to buy a copy of the book for myself. Thinking of going back and having him sign it.
5 0 -DarkStarrx His Dark Materials totally changed my views on life and death. It helped me a lot in facing my fears of death. Hands down one of the best trilogies I've ever come across.
9 0 elphie93 **The Diary of Anne Frank**. I read it when I was about 13 and it completely changed my perspective on my life and made me think about how lucky I was. I also ended up majoring in history with a primary focus on WWII in university and that book definitely set me on that path.
8 0 ratherreadabook 1984, Orson Wells. Deactivated FB after that.
3 0 OgreLord Not one book, but the 6 Dune books written by Frank Herbert
3 0 ferrettamer Le Petit Prince, it's like The Little Prince but French. I don't think I've ever had a book made me rethink my life tbh, maybe it's cause I've only lived like a quarter of it or maybe it's cause I don't read the books properly.
3 0 LogicAndSocrates nicomachean ethics by Aristotle
3 0 amgov *The Secret History*. I read it when my religious faith was waning. Doubts were creeping in, but I had experienced religious ecstasy and this, to me, was proof that there was a God. Then when I read *The Secret History*, and learned about bacchanalia and went down a Wikipedia rabbit-hole about religious ecstatic experiences. That severed the final thread for me.
2 0 FragWall *Vineland*; and *V.*; both by Thomas Pynchon.
2 0 osidebirdman90 **Fool’s Errand** by Scott Horton It’s about the never-ending war in Afghanistan. Thoroughly researched and cited. It’s obviously a nonfiction, but Scott wrote it really well. It’ll turn your previous thoughts on the Middle East and America’s involvement upside down. Scott Horton is vetted on foreign policy with over 4,000 recorded interviews under his belt, a podcast, editing antiwar.com and other projects. I admire his work greatly.
2 0 Shef_eel Although I did really like the hunger games, it surprises me to see it on top. My pick would be elementary particles / atomised by Michel Houellebecq. I think it made me more understanding of other peoples motives and ideas, as well as less emotionally instable and naive.
2 0 Lizosaurous Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
2 0 DanLewisFW The narrative of Frederick Douglas. Really opened my eyes about a lot of things. I always knew slavery was evil but it was really interesting to read what it did even to the Slave holders. So many lessons in that book.
1 0 tk_020 The places in between by Rory Stewart For those out there who are close minded it will open you. For those who are open minded it will just be a great reinforcement.
1 0 freephiddy The Good Earth by Pearl Buck and The Death of a Salesman both left me thinking for a while.
1 0 StevieSz Follow the River by James Alexander Thom
1 0 hello_sweatpants Heart of Darkness. Definitely changed the way I see the world in that it highlighted the immense impact of colonialism.
1 0 cyberine Not a book but Gaiman’s the Sandman did it for me
1 0 shezka_foxe The Defining Decade by Meg Jay, in it the author talks about how important the twenties are in a person's life. They talk about how they've dealt with people who made mistakes in their twenties and ended up paying for it later or wished they'd worked harder when they were younger. There was a lot of solid advice that made me start to re-hash aspects of my life and where I'm investing my free time. She even goes over relationships during this time in a person's life and shares the stories of people who are in their early or mid-twenties and how they started to work on turning their lives around to accomplish their goals. I ended up reading it because it was recommended in another thread about a year ago about books people had wished they had read early on in their adulthood.
1 0 thegirlwholeft Animal Farm - George Orwell Not just my life but the society as a whole, and my place in it. It's a short novel (less than 100 pages) but I think it's great.
1 0 anchor214 Thousand Spendid Sun, 1984