Score
Title
311
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
760
ELI5:How do air breathing sea animals like dolphins or whales not drown during violent seastorms?
20063
ELI5 : Why do we wake up starving the morning after a night of binge eating?
9
ELI5: How a music video is shot in slow motion, but the singer’s lips are synced with the audio
9
ELI5: why is math (statistics, calculus, etc) so important for a strong programmer?
23
ELI5: How does Japanese multiplication work? Why does this work?
18
ELI5: why the value of so many western currencies is roughly equal?
4
[ELI5] How to clearly explain the Monty Hall paradox
6
ELI5: Why do older video games look so angular, like they were pasting faces on the blocks of wood? What changed?
6
ELI5: Approximately how wide is Earth’s “orbit zone” and why is this the case?
2
ELI5: The purpose of Black Friday
2
ELI5: gastrointestinal sounds
3
ELI5: Why the cost of living has increased so much relative to inflation in the U.S.
4
ELI5: Why are the poles so cold?
726
ELI5: They say 70% of taste is smell. When we smell, let's say a public restroom, are we actually inhaling and "tasting" particles?
25
ELI5: Why are my photos horrible and professional photos look amazing? I used to think it's because I don't have a nice professional camera but I've seen pro photos taken with a cell phone and they make mine look like garbage in comparison. What's the deal?
5
ELI5:Why do we not feel food go down our bodies?
10
ELI5: In the case of muscular injuries - why does it hurt more 24-48 hours after, than at the point of injury?
8
ELI5: how do some areas have more than one power supplier since I would assume they would be using the same power lines and infrastructure?
1
ELI5: Why do fridges pop and bang (very loudly)
56
ELI5 When doing the same amount of physical labor, why do some people sweat a lot while others don't?
2
ELI5: The Flux And Gauss's Law
0
ELI5: If temperature is defined by the movement or jiggling of particles like atoms and molecules and if a vacuum is defined by an absent of those particles. How can a vacuum have a temperature?
1
ELI5 : If we have 1440p 120hz screens on phones(the Razer phone),then why can't we have tv sized screens with like 16k that are available for consumers?
1
ELI5: Why do you sometimes have to use the bathroom immediately after you eat or drink even if you didn’t need to before?
1
ELI5: what physically changes in a computer when you save something?
1
ELI5: What is the difference between a root and a rhizome?
1
ELI5: Why does swapping the batteries position in the remote control sometimes give you extra battery life?
1
ELI5: The physics behind this Russian recreational equipment. Link inside
1
ELI5: If tuition remission becomes taxable income under new U.S. House plan, why can't Universities list the cost of PhD programs at $0 a semester?
1
ELI5; why is it that, after a little while, y9u get used to the smells in a particular room or place and can no longer smell it i.e. like a room freshener in your home?
0
ELI5: Why do we sometimes like the smell of our own body odors (gas, armpit odor, tartar, etc.) but get grossed out by the odors of others?
1
ELI5: Does the amount of sucrose in a fruit correlate with its rate of decay?
1
ELI5: Where do the bubbles come from when boiling water?
24
ELI5: Why does our body subconsciously lean forward or stand when there is an intense moment happening (Like during a hard boss fight in gaming)?
1
ELI5: Why is any number to the power of zero 1?
2
ELI5:How dangerous would it be to transfuse blood from a diabetic who has a bad glucose regulation?
0
ELI5: Why do humans enjoy "gatekeeping"?
3
ELI5: The process of adding, changing, or repealing amendments of the U.S. Constitution?
0
ELI5: Could a planet get sucked into the sun?
2
ELI5: What causes different animals to have such different perceptions of time?
595 kouhoutek With great difficulty over the better part of a century. The Great Trigonometrical Survey of India started from the ocean in 1802, and 100 feet at a time, took measurements and did a bunch of math, and worked there way across the sub-continent to the Himalayas, completing in 1871. It was a great scientific achievement, lead during some of its more important years by George Everest, who received a knighthood for his efforts. The basic technique is fairly simple. You start with two sticks at sea level, a decent distance apart, and measure their exact longitude and latitude. Then you put a third stick some distance away and inland, making a triangle. Based on the distance between the first two sticks and the angles they form with the third stick, you can compute the third stick's exact position and elevation. Once all that is done, you repeat, planting a stick further inland and drawing a new triangle. The Great Survey did this with better instruments, better technique, and on a greater scale than had ever been done before.
79 CantTake_MySky Also, math and triangulation. Trigonometry has been around a long long time. See, with just one side of a triangle and the angle between it and another side, you can figure out the missing side. So if you make the triangle such that once side is easy to measure, and then you use a protractor and your vision to determine the angle, you can math the height.
39 ak_kitaq A field of study called geodetics used instruments called Theodolites. Sometimes they were called diopters. The theodolites almost look like telescopes but with a lot of rulers on it so you can determine which direction the telescopes are pointing, up-and-down and side-to-side. Using the measurements from the rulers on the theodolite, you can use math called Trigonometry to tell you how far away something else is. In the case of Chomolungma (Mt Everest), the British started from the ocean in India and measured all the way across the country until they could see the mountain. After getting their measurements, they did the math and found out how tall they thought the mountain was.
1614 PrimeMinisterEdBalls One way is by making a cup of tea. Water boils at 100°C only at sea level. The temperature at which water boils varies based on air pressure. For every 1000 metres, the boiling point drops by about 5 degrees. Thus, with a kettle and a thermometer you can estimate altitude.
14 billbixbyakahulk Trigonometry. In high school we visited an amusement park. By being a known distance from the base of the top of the roller coaster hill (length and angle (90 degrees) of one side of the triangle) and then calculating the angle to the top of the structure using a sighting scope, we could calculate the height. [This pic](https://image.slidesharecdn.com/heightanddistances-120108094402-phpapp01/95/height-and-distances-12-728.jpg?cb=1326016394) sums it up.
87 [deleted] [removed]
8 WarConsigliere They often didn't. I can't find the citation easily, but in the late 1990s/early 2000s, a very large number of Australian mountains and waterfalls had their heights revised after someone realised that there were a stupidly large number of them that were listed as having a height of 305 metres. Some went up, most went down - a couple by more than half. It turned out that the official height figures were often the estimates of the original explorer/surveyor and no-one had been arsed to actually measure them, especially because they weren't a suspiciously round number. Of course, the reason that they weren't a round number was because during metricisation in the 1970s a height of 1,000 feet had been converted to 305 metres, but that was before heights were recorded on computers and easily checked against each other.
588 0 kouhoutek With great difficulty over the better part of a century. The Great Trigonometrical Survey of India started from the ocean in 1802, and 100 feet at a time, took measurements and did a bunch of math, and worked there way across the sub-continent to the Himalayas, completing in 1871. It was a great scientific achievement, lead during some of its more important years by George Everest, who received a knighthood for his efforts. The basic technique is fairly simple. You start with two sticks at sea level, a decent distance apart, and measure their exact longitude and latitude. Then you put a third stick some distance away and inland, making a triangle. Based on the distance between the first two sticks and the angles they form with the third stick, you can compute the third stick's exact position and elevation. Once all that is done, you repeat, planting a stick further inland and drawing a new triangle. The Great Survey did this with better instruments, better technique, and on a greater scale than had ever been done before.
78 0 CantTake_MySky Also, math and triangulation. Trigonometry has been around a long long time. See, with just one side of a triangle and the angle between it and another side, you can figure out the missing side. So if you make the triangle such that once side is easy to measure, and then you use a protractor and your vision to determine the angle, you can math the height.
35 0 ak_kitaq A field of study called geodetics used instruments called Theodolites. Sometimes they were called diopters. The theodolites almost look like telescopes but with a lot of rulers on it so you can determine which direction the telescopes are pointing, up-and-down and side-to-side. Using the measurements from the rulers on the theodolite, you can use math called Trigonometry to tell you how far away something else is. In the case of Chomolungma (Mt Everest), the British started from the ocean in India and measured all the way across the country until they could see the mountain. After getting their measurements, they did the math and found out how tall they thought the mountain was.
1609 0 PrimeMinisterEdBalls One way is by making a cup of tea. Water boils at 100°C only at sea level. The temperature at which water boils varies based on air pressure. For every 1000 metres, the boiling point drops by about 5 degrees. Thus, with a kettle and a thermometer you can estimate altitude.
15 0 billbixbyakahulk Trigonometry. In high school we visited an amusement park. By being a known distance from the base of the top of the roller coaster hill (length and angle (90 degrees) of one side of the triangle) and then calculating the angle to the top of the structure using a sighting scope, we could calculate the height. [This pic](https://image.slidesharecdn.com/heightanddistances-120108094402-phpapp01/95/height-and-distances-12-728.jpg?cb=1326016394) sums it up.
91 0 [deleted] [removed]
6 0 WarConsigliere They often didn't. I can't find the citation easily, but in the late 1990s/early 2000s, a very large number of Australian mountains and waterfalls had their heights revised after someone realised that there were a stupidly large number of them that were listed as having a height of 305 metres. Some went up, most went down - a couple by more than half. It turned out that the official height figures were often the estimates of the original explorer/surveyor and no-one had been arsed to actually measure them, especially because they weren't a suspiciously round number. Of course, the reason that they weren't a round number was because during metricisation in the 1970s a height of 1,000 feet had been converted to 305 metres, but that was before heights were recorded on computers and easily checked against each other.