Score
Title
23
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
1375
ELI5 Why does water turn white when going over a waterfall? My 8 year old asked me and I was at a loss to explain.
440
ELI5: how did women shaving their legs/armpits come about and why did men not do it too?
8399
ELI5: Why does a familiar word sound unfamiliar after you overly repeat it?
1205
ELI5: There's 21% oxygen in air. When we breathe out, there's still 16% oxygen in the exhaled air. Why's our lung so inefficient?
108
ELI5: How close to 50/50 are genes from our parents? Is it possible to have more genes from one parent than the other?
177
ELI5 why is there so much activity with the Ring of Fire recently? How do we know which earthquakes are directly linked? Should California be as worried as the media makes out?
13
ELI5: Why does having "good lawyers" get people off with lesser punishments even if they're obviously guilty?
5
ELI5: Why is older wine considered "better"?
90
ELI5: Why might it be so hard for me to fall asleep again after waking up, but once my alarm goes off and I'm supposed to wake up, I suddenly can't stop hitting snooze and going back to sleep?
13
ELI5 How do civil engineers determine if a building is structurally sound after an earthquake?
18
ELI5: Why do we feel tense in our shoulders when we are stressed?
8
ELI5: Why didn't the US experience hyperinflation that many economists and politicians said was going to happen when the FED did its quantitative easing during the Great Recession?
182
ELI5 If symptoms of a cold serve the function of ridding our body of the illness, then do cold medicines that reduce these symptoms slow our recovery?
3
ElI5: How does anesthesia make us unconscious but doesn't harm or shut off unconscious functions?
3
ELI5; why is it that people snore when they are asleep, but don't have the same breathing pattern when awake?
4
ELI5: How can a cable possibly be stretched across the entire Atlantic Ocean?
7692
ELI5 why is it that we always see so many new awesome ways to fight cancer and yet it seems nothing of it is ever being used?
5
ELI5:Banned weapons in war
2721
ELI5: Why is CTE brain damage such a hot topic in the NFL, but don't hear anything from the Rugby community?
4
ELI5 Why do so many conservative groups use the word "Patriot" in their name?
2
ELI5: Why does the ESRB have a "Real Gambling" descriptor if online real-money gambling is illegal in the USA?
2
ELI5 why we tend to raise our voice when we're mad
3
ELI5 How do certain animals have the exact same pattern as a leopard?
4
ELI5: Why do indian people and other asian people have different skin tones despite being so close geographically?
4
ELI5: Why can my body handle heat or cold somedays better than others?
3
ELI5:Why is there such a huge disparity in airline prices (example in text)?
6
ELI5:Why must the Pythagorean Theorem contain squared values? Is there a relationship between sides prior to squaring them?
5
ELI5: Would inflation still happen if the population didn’t increase?
17
ELI5: Why are there still a few operating Blockbusters, and where does the money that they make go?
3
ELI5 - I'm driving on a Rosario with my 5 year old and she asks me how power lines carry electricity
0
ELI5 why can't we smell anything wen having a cold?
93
ELI5: That feeling you get when you’re traveling in a car and you go over a small but quick hill and your stomach has that weird sensation in it right as you reach the top and are hearing back down.
11
ELI5: What exactly is happening when one has water trapped in their ear?
3
ELIF: Why do people in black and white movies and tv shows sound the same?
2
ELI5: How does someone end up in extended domestic captivity and remain there?
1
ELI5: Why aren't service animals regulated by any sort of governing entity?
5
ELI5: Why didn't the confederates ever march on Washington D.C.?
8
ELI5:Why do some books have "This page has been intentionally left blank" page?
2
ELI5: why does a combination of weird scents, audio, and visual stimulation make me feel nauseous?
0
ELI5: How are satellites able to show such high definition photos from outer space
7 flooey On the vast majority of banknotes, it doesn't mean much of anything anymore. Historically, banknotes were redeemable (at times practically, at other times only theoretically) for a specific amount of precious metal (usually gold). But that hasn't been true for most currency in decades. For example, the Bank of England has this to say about the phrase on their banknotes: > The words "I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of five [ten/twenty/fifty] pounds" date from long ago when our notes represented deposits of gold. At that time, a member of the public could exchange one of our banknotes for gold to the same value. For example, a £5 note could be exchanged for five gold coins, called sovereigns. But the value of the pound has not been linked to gold for many years, so the meaning of the promise to pay has changed. Exchange into gold is no longer possible and Bank of England notes can only be exchanged for other Bank of England notes of the same face value. Public trust in the pound is now maintained by the operation of monetary policy, the objective of which is price stability.
2 UlmusIgnobelia Old banknotes were papers which promised that the bearer of the note could trade it at the bank for the stated value (usually in precious metal ilke silver). If you had silver on account at a bank, instead of hauling that around, you could get a paper which said that the recipient could go and pick up the silver whenever he or she wanted. Now we get to exchange paper instead of silver. Most currencies today are central bank notes and are not backed by a physical commodity, but sometimes old language can hang around for legal and traditional reasons. I suspect that they represent a legal fiction where they still appear. Currencies that don't have this language have different traditions.
1 rewboss The person making the promise is the person whose signature appears on the note -- in this case, I suspect you're talking about notes issued by the Bank of England (as that's the wording that appears on them), and the signature is that of the Chief Cashier, currently Victoria Cleland. Originally, the signature went directly below the text ("I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of..."). It means what it says: if you go to the Bank of England bearing a £5 note and say to the Chief Cashier, "I demand you pay me five pounds," she will give you five pounds' worth of gold. Originally -- back in Henry VIII's time -- this would have been five pounds Tower (a "Tower pound" equalled 12 ounces) of sterling silver, hence the name "pound sterling", but in the 19th century the pound moved to the gold standard, where one pound of currency was set equal to 113 grains (about a quarter of an ounce) of 22-carat gold. A banknote, you see, isn't an actual thing of value; it *represents* a certain amount of gold. Basically, a banknote is little more than an IOU from the issuing bank. At least... that is, or was, the theory. In practice, if you did storm into the Bank of England with a £5 note, the most likely response (besides calling security) would be: "Sorry, we can't give you £5 worth of gold -- it's locked in a vault elsewhere and in any case we're not on the gold standard any more. But here's an IOU in the form of a new £5 note."
1 cpast It's generally old text that no longer means anything. Originally, bank notes were issued by a bank to represent *real* money (e.g. gold) the bank had, but which wasn't really suitable to carry around all the time. Instead of physically giving you actual gold for a purchase, I'd give you an IOU from a bank saying "we owe whoever has this note $X in gold." But you probably didn't want to deal with physical gold either, so you could just hang on to that something and give it to someone else instead of giving them physical gold. At any point, someone could take this IOU to the bank and get it converted to real money. Over time, these IOUs became just as much "real" money as the gold was; there was generally no reason to convert them to gold. Laws were passed making it so that they counted as a legitimate way to pay off a debt, which gave them a second thing (besides getting gold) that they were legally guaranteed to be useful for. Since exchanging them for gold no longer served much purpose and made it harder to keep the economy running smoothly, governments dropped the idea that they just represented real money. At this point, banknotes *are* real money, not a promise of a certain amount of a commodity. But some designs might still keep the old text.
8 0 flooey On the vast majority of banknotes, it doesn't mean much of anything anymore. Historically, banknotes were redeemable (at times practically, at other times only theoretically) for a specific amount of precious metal (usually gold). But that hasn't been true for most currency in decades. For example, the Bank of England has this to say about the phrase on their banknotes: > The words "I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of five [ten/twenty/fifty] pounds" date from long ago when our notes represented deposits of gold. At that time, a member of the public could exchange one of our banknotes for gold to the same value. For example, a £5 note could be exchanged for five gold coins, called sovereigns. But the value of the pound has not been linked to gold for many years, so the meaning of the promise to pay has changed. Exchange into gold is no longer possible and Bank of England notes can only be exchanged for other Bank of England notes of the same face value. Public trust in the pound is now maintained by the operation of monetary policy, the objective of which is price stability.
2 0 UlmusIgnobelia Old banknotes were papers which promised that the bearer of the note could trade it at the bank for the stated value (usually in precious metal ilke silver). If you had silver on account at a bank, instead of hauling that around, you could get a paper which said that the recipient could go and pick up the silver whenever he or she wanted. Now we get to exchange paper instead of silver. Most currencies today are central bank notes and are not backed by a physical commodity, but sometimes old language can hang around for legal and traditional reasons. I suspect that they represent a legal fiction where they still appear. Currencies that don't have this language have different traditions.
1 0 rewboss The person making the promise is the person whose signature appears on the note -- in this case, I suspect you're talking about notes issued by the Bank of England (as that's the wording that appears on them), and the signature is that of the Chief Cashier, currently Victoria Cleland. Originally, the signature went directly below the text ("I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of..."). It means what it says: if you go to the Bank of England bearing a £5 note and say to the Chief Cashier, "I demand you pay me five pounds," she will give you five pounds' worth of gold. Originally -- back in Henry VIII's time -- this would have been five pounds Tower (a "Tower pound" equalled 12 ounces) of sterling silver, hence the name "pound sterling", but in the 19th century the pound moved to the gold standard, where one pound of currency was set equal to 113 grains (about a quarter of an ounce) of 22-carat gold. A banknote, you see, isn't an actual thing of value; it *represents* a certain amount of gold. Basically, a banknote is little more than an IOU from the issuing bank. At least... that is, or was, the theory. In practice, if you did storm into the Bank of England with a £5 note, the most likely response (besides calling security) would be: "Sorry, we can't give you £5 worth of gold -- it's locked in a vault elsewhere and in any case we're not on the gold standard any more. But here's an IOU in the form of a new £5 note."
1 0 cpast It's generally old text that no longer means anything. Originally, bank notes were issued by a bank to represent *real* money (e.g. gold) the bank had, but which wasn't really suitable to carry around all the time. Instead of physically giving you actual gold for a purchase, I'd give you an IOU from a bank saying "we owe whoever has this note $X in gold." But you probably didn't want to deal with physical gold either, so you could just hang on to that something and give it to someone else instead of giving them physical gold. At any point, someone could take this IOU to the bank and get it converted to real money. Over time, these IOUs became just as much "real" money as the gold was; there was generally no reason to convert them to gold. Laws were passed making it so that they counted as a legitimate way to pay off a debt, which gave them a second thing (besides getting gold) that they were legally guaranteed to be useful for. Since exchanging them for gold no longer served much purpose and made it harder to keep the economy running smoothly, governments dropped the idea that they just represented real money. At this point, banknotes *are* real money, not a promise of a certain amount of a commodity. But some designs might still keep the old text.