Score
Title
331
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
4679
ELI5: How come spent nuclear fuel is constantly being cooled for about 2 decades? Why can't we just use the spent fuel to boil water to spin turbines?
11691
ELI5:How does the human ear discern between a quiet noise and a distant noise?
7
ELI5: Why aren't aspect ratios expressed in simplest form?
15765
ELI5: How do smelling salts wake you up after you’ve been unconscious?
1
ELI5: why do we know so little about blue whales?
1
ELI5: Why are "prior bad acts" not allowed in the criminal cases?
4
ELI5: How do cellphones know what signal from what network to listen to? What is different about different networks' cell towers that a phone can decipher which one to listen to?
14
ELI5: how can electrons just be ok on their own and fly around?
3
ELI5: How exactly could a boat be driven ashore by ice?
2
ELI5: Why do we jerk forward when we sneeze? If we're expelling mass forward, shouldn't the jerk be in the opposite direction?
20
ELI5: Object oriented vs. Functional programming
0
ELI5: Why is it when a woman gets an epidural, there's a chance she'll always have some sort of pain that can't be treated for the rest of her life?
0
ELI5: Why is it hard to swallow without a liquid in your mouth?
0
ELI5 What makes a person allergic to something?
6
ELI5: Why are clouds distinctly different shapes but easily categorizable?
12
ELI5: How can a program teach itself to play a game like mario cart?
5
ELI5: Does activated charcoal passively collect fumes as any other surface or is there a 'pull' effect?
1
ELI5: Why do rechargable batteries gradually last for a shorter and shorter amount of time, even when you charge them fully?
2
ELI5: Why is your voice deeper when you have a cold?
1
ELI5: why is it hard to reproduce metallic colors (shine) accurately on display screen?
3
ELI5: Why do we still have the common cold if we already had it once, shouldn't our bodies be prepared for it ?
12
ELI5: How come taking an extended break from something sometimes makes you come back to it stronger than ever?
7
ELI5: What is Artificial neural networking?
2
ELI5: What is "Clearing" and how does it work? (Finance)
0
ELI5: why is that after you have had a beard or mustache you will always see its contour forever eve if you shave everyday completely?
56
ELI5: The long term effects of blasting music with earphones/headphones
0
ELI5: Drone battery life
2
ELI5: How can a screwball or curveball change direction in flight?
1
ELI5: Why do two windows open make for a better draft?
0
ELI5 : Why is it that when we read or think about something we don't hear a distinct voice associated with it.
6
ELI5: Why does black-top (AKA asphalt, tarmac, macadam, etc) fade from black to gray?
2
ELI5: How androgens relate to blood pressure
394
ELI5: What happens that makes beer taste terrible after warming up and then re-chilling? What makes beer 'skunky'?
2
ELI5: Why disconnecting and reconnecting the modem "works"?
0
ELI5: What is culture?
8
ELI5: Why do you have to salt pasta water? Why isn't the pasta already salted?
2
ELI5: what makes marshmallows inflate in the microwave?
8568
ELI5: How is it possible that ISP's can see what your up to online? I thought HTTPs encrypted your traffic so it can't be read?
10
ELI5: Vector components?
1
ELI5: What is the haze that appears in the neck of a bottle of beer when it is first opened?
56 slash178 The director does not deal with money. That's the producer's job. The producer works for the company fronting that budget. They are in charge of making sure the money is spent in the way intended. The director is the creative force of the film. So the director goes to the producer and says "we need all this shit to shoot this scene". The producer determines how much all that will cost. They do the same scene by scene by scene, and the producer writes a budget and a production schedule. Then that budget is presented to the producer's boss, the executive producer. The executive producer looks at the budget and decides if he thinks the movie is worth it. Then he approves the budget (sometime with changes, e.g. "Do we really need this?" and argues with the director about why X is necessary and if they can get away with using cheaper Z"). The process takes a *long time* and movies can get stuck in "development hell" where the director, producer, and executive producer are just going back and forth forever. There is not a lump sum transferred to the producer. Rather, every cost is given to the producer as an invoice, and it is billed receipt by receipt to the executive producer's company.
7 120_pages I'm not sure a single film has reached a $1B budget. A film that large would be financed by a major studio. They set up a corporation just for that one film, and they loan the new corporation the money. They don't send it all at once; it's paid as needed. Before the studio agrees to make the movie, the producers make a schedule and a budget from the script. This accounts for everything from how many days they need the actors, to how many lunches needs to be prepared, and how many special effects shots. The process of budgeting and scheduling a huge movie takes a large team of *line producers* and *unit production managers* these are producers who do the nuts and bolts of the production. They are like sargeants -- they make the thing happen. In the process of making the schedule and budget, they will have to bid and consult with every department, from camera and electrical to editing and VFX. They will also negotiate deals with support providers like hotels and caterers. When the budget and schedule are finalized, the studio may ask for revisions if they think it costs too much. Some producers negotiate a bonus if they deliver under the budget. Some studios won't do this, because they want the best movie, so they can make more money from it. If the film is radically under budget, it's seen as a failing of the producers, because they failed to estimate properly.
2 harland45 Look more closely into the role a Producer plays in the film process. ELI5, the producer is essentially the CEO of the film. The director is the top **creative** talent on the film who is, truthfully, just another hired hand like anyone else working on the movie. A producer's core responsibilities are to handle the entire production process including hiring, budgeting, scheduling, and.... what it really evolves into.... the lead firefighter who manages every major crisis that comes up. Major films are largely financed by the large studios. Those studios will hire (or appoint) a Producer to manage the production (be the movie's CEO). Executive Producers are typically appointed by the studio to act as the eyes and ears of the studio executives. They will typically be the most conservative voices in terms of spending money. Costs are typically paid to vendors from the studio.
53 0 slash178 The director does not deal with money. That's the producer's job. The producer works for the company fronting that budget. They are in charge of making sure the money is spent in the way intended. The director is the creative force of the film. So the director goes to the producer and says "we need all this shit to shoot this scene". The producer determines how much all that will cost. They do the same scene by scene by scene, and the producer writes a budget and a production schedule. Then that budget is presented to the producer's boss, the executive producer. The executive producer looks at the budget and decides if he thinks the movie is worth it. Then he approves the budget (sometime with changes, e.g. "Do we really need this?" and argues with the director about why X is necessary and if they can get away with using cheaper Z"). The process takes a *long time* and movies can get stuck in "development hell" where the director, producer, and executive producer are just going back and forth forever. There is not a lump sum transferred to the producer. Rather, every cost is given to the producer as an invoice, and it is billed receipt by receipt to the executive producer's company.
7 0 120_pages I'm not sure a single film has reached a $1B budget. A film that large would be financed by a major studio. They set up a corporation just for that one film, and they loan the new corporation the money. They don't send it all at once; it's paid as needed. Before the studio agrees to make the movie, the producers make a schedule and a budget from the script. This accounts for everything from how many days they need the actors, to how many lunches needs to be prepared, and how many special effects shots. The process of budgeting and scheduling a huge movie takes a large team of *line producers* and *unit production managers* these are producers who do the nuts and bolts of the production. They are like sargeants -- they make the thing happen. In the process of making the schedule and budget, they will have to bid and consult with every department, from camera and electrical to editing and VFX. They will also negotiate deals with support providers like hotels and caterers. When the budget and schedule are finalized, the studio may ask for revisions if they think it costs too much. Some producers negotiate a bonus if they deliver under the budget. Some studios won't do this, because they want the best movie, so they can make more money from it. If the film is radically under budget, it's seen as a failing of the producers, because they failed to estimate properly.
2 0 harland45 Look more closely into the role a Producer plays in the film process. ELI5, the producer is essentially the CEO of the film. The director is the top **creative** talent on the film who is, truthfully, just another hired hand like anyone else working on the movie. A producer's core responsibilities are to handle the entire production process including hiring, budgeting, scheduling, and.... what it really evolves into.... the lead firefighter who manages every major crisis that comes up. Major films are largely financed by the large studios. Those studios will hire (or appoint) a Producer to manage the production (be the movie's CEO). Executive Producers are typically appointed by the studio to act as the eyes and ears of the studio executives. They will typically be the most conservative voices in terms of spending money. Costs are typically paid to vendors from the studio.