Score
Title
759
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
13926
ELI5: how do cuts on the inside of your mouth, on your cheek, tongue and lip not get super infected by all of our nasty mouth germs?
39
ELI5: How to find lumps in breast? Everything feels lumpy, I don't get it.
26
ELI5: How are things like "Senior Citizen" discounts and 55+ communities not considered age discrimination?
36
ELI5: Why do airplane engines rev up so fiercely upon landing?
20383
ELI5: How do movies get that distinctly "movie" look from the cameras?
5
ELI5: how come people sometimes shake their legs or bounce them up and down repetitively when when they are sitting?
7
ELI5: Why does the air above a fire look rippled/distorted?
12
ELI5: Why is the natural instinct when feeling extreme emotion (e.g. fear, sadness, joy) to cry?
5
ELI5: Why did that 1971 Coke ad become so legendary?
3
ELI5:Why does mouthwash burn when you swish?
4
ELI5: What is a magic eraser and why does it work?
7
ELI5: Why is the normal force not greater than gravity?
7
ELI5: Why are 2 liter sodas cheaper than 20 oz sodas?
85
ELI5: Whenever you have a condition that makes you itchy (e.g. bug bite, dry skin, fungus), scratching typically makes the problem worse. So why is our urge to scratch so strong?
2
ELI5: Why, when releasing ear pressure - that might come from a flight, does one ear consistently release before the other?
2
ELI5: insects getting into a home but unable to get out
5
ELI5: Delaunay triangulation/Voronoi diagram algorithms
12
ELI5: How does a clone differ from an identical twin?
5
ELI5: How do insect and bug sprays kill insects but don't harm us
2
ELI5: Why does our depth perception get so bad while covering one eye or wearing an eye patch?
2
ELI5: In Figure Skating, What's the difference between a (Triple) Lutz vs Loop vs Flip vs Axel vs Salchow?
1
ELI5: Why do flickering lights cause headaches for most people while strobe lights are ok for most?
0
ELI5 What am I hearing when it thunders during a storm?
1
ELI5: Why is fighting a two front war a disadvantage?
5
ELI5: How identical cells in a fertilized egg differentiate to produce different body parts?
1
ELI5: What's the difference between welding and soldering?
1
ELI5: How does a kidney infection cause nausea?
12
ELI5: Why does hot water release tea from tea leaves better than cold water?
7
ELI5 why do combustion engines hum instead of sounding like a high rate of fire machine gun?
7
ELI5: Why do smartphones use chips that have several cores (6 to 8) clocked at low speeds (1.8 to 2.3 GHz) whereas desktops use chips that have fewer cores (2 to 6) clocked at high speeds (3GHz and up)?
1
Eli5: Why diamonds are rip offs?
5
ELI5: Why are there so many "Chinatown" neighborhoods in different North American cities? Was there a large exodus from China some time last century or so?
1
ELI5:What determines whether cold + preciptation = snow, hail, sleet, or freezing rain?
1
ELI5: How do walks for cancer raise money?
1
ELI5:Given that both are determined by neutral networks in the brain, why can’t you change handedness like you can change your mind?
1
ELI5: Why do cold objects often feel wet or damp?
5
ELI5: What is Saccadic Masking, why does it happen, and is it possible to prevent?
8
ELI5 Why does everyone say not to land in the water if your parachute fails or some other reason?
0
ELI5: why when you hurt yourself does rubbing it help?
2
ELI5: How does software know where to appropriately hyphenate words?
94 blipsman Currently, there are a bunch of different private insurance companies who provide health insurance -- BlueCross/BlueShield, Cigna, Humana, Kaiser Permamente, and so on. We get these private insurance plans either through our employer, paying premiums through paycheck withholding, or by buying an individual plan. In addition to these private insurance plans, there are also government run plans like Medicare and Medicaid. In a single payer system, there is one insurance provider -- the government. Instead of paying premiums to the various companies, we'd pay a healthcare tax. Instead of doctors and hospitals having to deal with all these different insurance companies, and all the different plans they offer, there would be one SINGLE PAYER who pays all the claims. So the doctor is no longer submitting a bill to Cigna and getting $100 reimbursed, and $120 from BlueCross, and $75 from Medicare, and having to make sure claims are coded just-so based on each payers' requirements in order to get the reimbursement and so on. It's all the same requirements, all the same payouts. In theory, the efficiencies from reducing overhead on billing through this streamlining, along with the lack of profit margins of private companies, and the larger negotiating power of a single payer, mean that the costs could be the same or reduced and yet cover everybody. There are those who will counter with the "government is never as efficient as private business" but if you've ever dealt with health insurance companies, you know there are as bureaucratic as they come, and that they are not capitalistic businesses in the sense that they have to fight for our business -- typically our employer makes the choice and our options are take it or leave it, so they have no accountability to us as customers.
14 groovyreg In the UK, for people in employment, we pay about 12% of our income in National Insurance. Our employers pay another 13.8% contribution. This pool of money goes to pay for healthcare for all. Actually, it's not really that straightforward as National Insurance pays for a bunch of things like the state pension and other benefits and the majority of the cost of the National Health Service actually comes from general taxation. Regardless of where the money actually comes from, we all pay into a big pot and get healthcare when we need it. The level of care you receive isn't based on an ability to pay. You earn more, you pay more in tax, but you receive the same level of care regardless. There are some exceptions - not everything is free at the point of need. We pay a flat fee for all prescriptions and a lot of dentistry is privatised these days. You can opt to pay for private treatment. You still have to pay for the NHS (you can't opt out) and virtually all complex (ergo expensive) treatment is conducted by the NHS. The advantage of this single-payer system is that the one big health provider has immense buying power so benefits from economies of scale. As the only game in town, pharmaceutical companies and even individual doctors, cannot sell their products and services to the highest bidder, they either trade with the NHS or don't deal at all. The disadvantage of this system is that you can't really jump the queue by paying more (okay, you can to an extent but not really for anything substantive) so, if you're in that financial position you might not favour such a system. Furthermore, policy decisions are taken in the best interests of users overall. This can mean that some very expensive treatments aren't purchased by the NHS as it's determined in a cost/benefit analysis to be an inefficient use of finite resources. Also it could be argued that the NHS' virtual monopoly means this system lacks the drive that competition can bring to an industry (depending on your economic philosophy). Anyway, for an average Joe in an average job, you get your payslip at the end of the month and a chunk of the gross is removed in tax and national insurance. When you need to see a doctor you make an appointment (usually with a family doctor aka a GP) who will provide you with treatment or refer you to a specialist. The two events (paying tax/receiving medical treatment) have no connection in everyday life - you always pay tax and you get medical treatment whenever you need it. There's generally no appetite to change this system here - any suggestion of introducing a profit-motive into healthcare is met with strenuous resistance.
16 stairway2evan In the current system in the US, you go to the hospital, you get some treatment or some medicine or whatever, and they write up a bill. Depending on you and your situation, that bill will either go to the government (for Medicare, Medicaid, or other government health programs), to an insurance company (for most people with typical health insurance) or to you, the patient (if none of those apply). So there are multiple possible payers for the hospital to be billing. In a true single-payer system, every hospital bill would just go to the government. They basically act as everyone's insurance company, regardless of age, income, health, etc. Of course there's a bit more to it than that (on both sides) and it's no small debate, but that's the crux of the issue right now: whether the current model needs to be fixed or whether the US should switch to a fully government-funded healthcare system.
6 NotChistianRudder Frontline has a very thorough [documentary](http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sickaroundtheworld/) about several different healthcare systems around the world. Worth watching.
5 vorpalblab As a Canadian the single payer system functions like this, you pay your taxes, you get health care. I live in Quebec, and in addition to the health care, I also get all meds covered for something like 80 dollars a month. I take 17 pills every day. I also get a shot of some drug into my eyeball that costs 1400 bucks a shot every six weeks. I was working in France for 5 years (another single pay system that works great) and a week or so after arriving back in Canada I had a heart attack before I could switch my coverage to the Canadian system. So off to the emerg. No questions asked about how I was gonna pay the bill. Off to the OR after stabilising the situation and then a quintuple bypass was done. After it was all over the bill looked like about 100,000 dollars but, it was covered when the French sped up the document transfer in a miracle of bureaucratic efficiency and it was covered in Quebec. The thing is, each hospital in the province is subsidised for all operating costs and overhead by the health care system so all services provided regardless of ability to pay and are not on a money lost basis and all who arrive are treated. The hospital can bill non covered patients, but whatever they do collect is in addition to their budget income. (Also the hospitals do not make a huge effort to collect all the non covered Emergency Department bills.) However if the arrival is a non-emergency or elective procedure, there are different responses, like who is gonna pay how much and when.
5 dkf295 In a single payer system, the government IS/runs the health insurance company, as opposed to subsidizing private health insurance companies as happens under the current model.
94 0 blipsman Currently, there are a bunch of different private insurance companies who provide health insurance -- BlueCross/BlueShield, Cigna, Humana, Kaiser Permamente, and so on. We get these private insurance plans either through our employer, paying premiums through paycheck withholding, or by buying an individual plan. In addition to these private insurance plans, there are also government run plans like Medicare and Medicaid. In a single payer system, there is one insurance provider -- the government. Instead of paying premiums to the various companies, we'd pay a healthcare tax. Instead of doctors and hospitals having to deal with all these different insurance companies, and all the different plans they offer, there would be one SINGLE PAYER who pays all the claims. So the doctor is no longer submitting a bill to Cigna and getting $100 reimbursed, and $120 from BlueCross, and $75 from Medicare, and having to make sure claims are coded just-so based on each payers' requirements in order to get the reimbursement and so on. It's all the same requirements, all the same payouts. In theory, the efficiencies from reducing overhead on billing through this streamlining, along with the lack of profit margins of private companies, and the larger negotiating power of a single payer, mean that the costs could be the same or reduced and yet cover everybody. There are those who will counter with the "government is never as efficient as private business" but if you've ever dealt with health insurance companies, you know there are as bureaucratic as they come, and that they are not capitalistic businesses in the sense that they have to fight for our business -- typically our employer makes the choice and our options are take it or leave it, so they have no accountability to us as customers.
14 0 groovyreg In the UK, for people in employment, we pay about 12% of our income in National Insurance. Our employers pay another 13.8% contribution. This pool of money goes to pay for healthcare for all. Actually, it's not really that straightforward as National Insurance pays for a bunch of things like the state pension and other benefits and the majority of the cost of the National Health Service actually comes from general taxation. Regardless of where the money actually comes from, we all pay into a big pot and get healthcare when we need it. The level of care you receive isn't based on an ability to pay. You earn more, you pay more in tax, but you receive the same level of care regardless. There are some exceptions - not everything is free at the point of need. We pay a flat fee for all prescriptions and a lot of dentistry is privatised these days. You can opt to pay for private treatment. You still have to pay for the NHS (you can't opt out) and virtually all complex (ergo expensive) treatment is conducted by the NHS. The advantage of this single-payer system is that the one big health provider has immense buying power so benefits from economies of scale. As the only game in town, pharmaceutical companies and even individual doctors, cannot sell their products and services to the highest bidder, they either trade with the NHS or don't deal at all. The disadvantage of this system is that you can't really jump the queue by paying more (okay, you can to an extent but not really for anything substantive) so, if you're in that financial position you might not favour such a system. Furthermore, policy decisions are taken in the best interests of users overall. This can mean that some very expensive treatments aren't purchased by the NHS as it's determined in a cost/benefit analysis to be an inefficient use of finite resources. Also it could be argued that the NHS' virtual monopoly means this system lacks the drive that competition can bring to an industry (depending on your economic philosophy). Anyway, for an average Joe in an average job, you get your payslip at the end of the month and a chunk of the gross is removed in tax and national insurance. When you need to see a doctor you make an appointment (usually with a family doctor aka a GP) who will provide you with treatment or refer you to a specialist. The two events (paying tax/receiving medical treatment) have no connection in everyday life - you always pay tax and you get medical treatment whenever you need it. There's generally no appetite to change this system here - any suggestion of introducing a profit-motive into healthcare is met with strenuous resistance.
14 0 stairway2evan In the current system in the US, you go to the hospital, you get some treatment or some medicine or whatever, and they write up a bill. Depending on you and your situation, that bill will either go to the government (for Medicare, Medicaid, or other government health programs), to an insurance company (for most people with typical health insurance) or to you, the patient (if none of those apply). So there are multiple possible payers for the hospital to be billing. In a true single-payer system, every hospital bill would just go to the government. They basically act as everyone's insurance company, regardless of age, income, health, etc. Of course there's a bit more to it than that (on both sides) and it's no small debate, but that's the crux of the issue right now: whether the current model needs to be fixed or whether the US should switch to a fully government-funded healthcare system.
6 0 NotChistianRudder Frontline has a very thorough [documentary](http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sickaroundtheworld/) about several different healthcare systems around the world. Worth watching.
3 0 vorpalblab As a Canadian the single payer system functions like this, you pay your taxes, you get health care. I live in Quebec, and in addition to the health care, I also get all meds covered for something like 80 dollars a month. I take 17 pills every day. I also get a shot of some drug into my eyeball that costs 1400 bucks a shot every six weeks. I was working in France for 5 years (another single pay system that works great) and a week or so after arriving back in Canada I had a heart attack before I could switch my coverage to the Canadian system. So off to the emerg. No questions asked about how I was gonna pay the bill. Off to the OR after stabilising the situation and then a quintuple bypass was done. After it was all over the bill looked like about 100,000 dollars but, it was covered when the French sped up the document transfer in a miracle of bureaucratic efficiency and it was covered in Quebec. The thing is, each hospital in the province is subsidised for all operating costs and overhead by the health care system so all services provided regardless of ability to pay and are not on a money lost basis and all who arrive are treated. The hospital can bill non covered patients, but whatever they do collect is in addition to their budget income. (Also the hospitals do not make a huge effort to collect all the non covered Emergency Department bills.) However if the arrival is a non-emergency or elective procedure, there are different responses, like who is gonna pay how much and when.
5 0 dkf295 In a single payer system, the government IS/runs the health insurance company, as opposed to subsidizing private health insurance companies as happens under the current model.