Score
Title
616
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
3274
ELI5: How is magnesium, an easily flammable metal used in flares, used to make products such as car parts and computer casings?
9901
ELI5: Why do LED lights look jittery or like they're strobing when you look at them quickly?
109
ELI5: What is the Speed of a Photon as it Gets Reflected by a Mirror?
77
ELI5: What is the difference between a tort and a crime?
9
ELI5:If you put water into an unbreakable container and froze it, what would happen?
6
ELI5: Does a person age slower living on the equator than the arctic circle due to traveling faster in the same amount of time?
6
ELI5: Why do lines appear in the picture when you photograph a computer screen?
5
ELI5: If one company buys out another company for a monetary fee, wouldn’t the money go back to the parent company, therefore the parent company essentially gained capital for free since they own the other company? How does that work?
4
ELI5: How the speed of light is constant in all reference frames
8
ELI5: Plants vs Fungi
3
ELI5: What is an RSS Feed?
3
ELI5:Why would the government produce a record of all the CIA's wrong doing?
5
ELI5: Why does freshly squeezed orange juice taste so different from orange juice in a carton?
4
ELI5: Why is the standard deviation of the sampling distribution less than the standard deviation of the population?
3
ELI5: how can Washington Lake (freshwater) exist on Teraina (middle of the Pacific Ocean)?
2
ELI5: Why does it become nearly impossible to hold your bladder when you are near to the bathroom?
4
ELI5: Why didn’t any astronomers see the meteor that went past Michigan?
3
ELI5: what is a bond investment in relation to a Roth IRA?
2
ELI5:How come a person's signature is needed when paying with a credit card if the staff doesn't check it?
5
ELI5: Why is sound measured in decibels? Is it logarithmic?
3
ELI5: zipped files
1
ELI5: How can projector produce a black image.
1
ELI5: Why do conduction and valence bands occur?
2
ELI5: Why does liquid bubble when it boils?
1
ELI5: Why do you get cramps when you drink water really fast and exercise/run?
6
ELI5:What is the difference between Term life and Whole life insurance?
2
ELI5: Bank of Canada Interest Rate: Why do they raise it, why is it good to raise it (and who for), and why can’t they leave it at 0%?
1
ELI5: Why is it more difficult to wake up when its raining/cloudy outside?
3
ELI5: Why is it that when we try to remember something in the past, it sometimes takes a minute to actually recollect it? What is our brain doing during that time?
1
ELI5: How do the etymologies of the words 'deductive'-, 'inductive'- and 'abductive'- reasoning fit in with their definitions?
0
ELI5: How do guitar pickups avoid picking up other vibrations and background noise?
1
ELI5: Linking cars together like a train to go up a hill collectively more effective than going by your car’s power singularly
1
ELI5: The difference between square rooting and simplified square rooting?
3
ELI5: Why do cars slightly move up when your foot isn’t touching the gas pedal?
3
ELI5: Why is our bodies reacting like it is to drugs like heroin.
3
ELI5: How do I calculate these probability situations if my math skills end around algebra?
7
ELI5:Why do certain colors of lights have a second, differently colored ring around the source?
2
ELI5: How do Bionic Ears work?
1
ELI5: What is an Exchange-Traded Fund?
1
ELI5: Why is deer meat described as “gamey”? What does “gamey” mean?
253 Reese_Tora Biohazard waste (removed body parts and those disposable tools that come in contact with your blood, for instance) are destroyed in a way that is designed to make sure that no living cells could remain, such as dissolving in chemicals or burning to ash in an incinerator. I would like to point out that body parts that are removed are not necessarily unnecessary- even the appendix, the archetypical useless organ, is currently thought to provide some function (providing a safe store of positive bacteria to re-populate the intestines after something like diarrhea flushes them out)
82 zZINCc Pathologists' Assistant and med tech here. When you get a body part removed it will come to the anatomic pathology lab or clinical lab. The clinical lab deals with liquids (blood, urine, spinal fluid, etc.) and microbiology while the anatomic lab is exactly that: for anatomic parts! So if you got your appendix removed it will go the anatomic pathology lab to be "grossed" (measured, described) and sectioned. What we do to the appendix depends on what it was taken out for. No matter what we will snip off the entire distal tip (the end opposite the side that attaches to the cecum) as that can harbor a kind of tumor called a carcinoid tumor. We will then serially section the appendix looking for any abnormalities. What does the lumen contain? Fecal material, fecoliths, blood, pus, nothing? How does the serosa (the outside of the appendix) look? Is it dull and not shiny? Does it have purulent exudate on it or the attached fat (mesoappendix)? Is it torn or is there a perforation? Finally, we look at how thick the wall of the appendix is (they are usually about 0.2 cm thick). A normal gross dictation of your presumably normal appendix that may have been incidentally taken out will look something like this: Received fresh labeled with the patient's name, medical record number, and additionally labeled "appendix" is a 6.5 cm in length by 0.5 cm in diameter appendix with 2.0 cm of attached mesoappendix. The serosa is pink-tan, smooth, and glistening. The specimen is serially sectioned to reveal a 0.2 cm lumen containing blood and a 0.2 cm thick wall. Representative sections are submitted as follows: 1A = entire distal tip bisected longitudinally 1B = representative cross sections including inked proximal margin Edit: So if you have appendicitis I will look for purulent exudate on the serosa, in the appendix itself, and will make sure there isn't a perforation. Edit 2: The sections I submit in cassettes are then processed and cut by histotechs. These small (think micron size sections) are then stained (usually with hematoxylin and eosin) and the pathologist will examine the slide under the scope. They perform the final diagnosis; in the case of appendicitis looking for neutrophils inside the lumen.
27 [deleted] The vet hospital of the local university has a chemical vat that they dissolve remains in, should the need arise. From what I understand they only do this if there is some reason which the animal cannot be disposed of by other means. Communicable animal diseases come to mind.
23 Withoutastapler I've got a story about the old methods of disposal. For reference, I am an environmental geologist and was working near Flint, MI a few years ago. Had to do a subsurface investigation at one of the vacant hospitals because for 30+ years they dumped all biowaste into an open pit west of the hospital. They filled in the "skin pit" (what my coworkers and I dubbed the dump) in the late 1980s with building debris from an old on-site church, and then paved over it for extra parking. We drilled the pit and found significant contamination, including formaldehyde, in the groundwater. All of the houses down-gradient of the hospital had to connect to city water. Pretty gross considering how long they were drinking that.
20 mechooseausernameno Your appendix would go to the pathologist and get fixed in formalin initially so it could then be examined under a microscope to assess the cause. A very small number have tumours. In general most excised organs get sent to pathology before disposal.
15 RazorRush Had my wisdom teeth pulled and wanted them. Was told no it's biohazard waste. How did they go from my extra teeth to biohazard in 30 minutes. No one could explain. Did not get them.
29 WRSaunders It's special Medical Waste. Yes, they throw them out, like the bloody sponges, unless they need to go to the lab for a biopsy.
4 TangoZippo It varies drastically across the world, but medical waste (including removed organs, but also many other forms of medical waste ranging from bloody bandages to used needles) is usually incinerated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomedical_waste
6 CoomassieBlues It's not the biggest body part, but I worked in a lab that collected and used foreskins (from circumcisions). Infants tissues can be harvested for stem cells and it turns out cutting off other bits of the baby is commonly considered unethical.
12 [deleted] [deleted]
4 dog_in_the_vent For the record even though this doesn't really pertain to your question: your appendix is [not totally useless](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008102334.htm) as once thought. It produces gut flora, which is to say bacteria in your digestive tract that help digest food. You can live without it, but it's not useless.
255 0 Reese_Tora Biohazard waste (removed body parts and those disposable tools that come in contact with your blood, for instance) are destroyed in a way that is designed to make sure that no living cells could remain, such as dissolving in chemicals or burning to ash in an incinerator. I would like to point out that body parts that are removed are not necessarily unnecessary- even the appendix, the archetypical useless organ, is currently thought to provide some function (providing a safe store of positive bacteria to re-populate the intestines after something like diarrhea flushes them out)
83 0 zZINCc Pathologists' Assistant and med tech here. When you get a body part removed it will come to the anatomic pathology lab or clinical lab. The clinical lab deals with liquids (blood, urine, spinal fluid, etc.) and microbiology while the anatomic lab is exactly that: for anatomic parts! So if you got your appendix removed it will go the anatomic pathology lab to be "grossed" (measured, described) and sectioned. What we do to the appendix depends on what it was taken out for. No matter what we will snip off the entire distal tip (the end opposite the side that attaches to the cecum) as that can harbor a kind of tumor called a carcinoid tumor. We will then serially section the appendix looking for any abnormalities. What does the lumen contain? Fecal material, fecoliths, blood, pus, nothing? How does the serosa (the outside of the appendix) look? Is it dull and not shiny? Does it have purulent exudate on it or the attached fat (mesoappendix)? Is it torn or is there a perforation? Finally, we look at how thick the wall of the appendix is (they are usually about 0.2 cm thick). A normal gross dictation of your presumably normal appendix that may have been incidentally taken out will look something like this: Received fresh labeled with the patient's name, medical record number, and additionally labeled "appendix" is a 6.5 cm in length by 0.5 cm in diameter appendix with 2.0 cm of attached mesoappendix. The serosa is pink-tan, smooth, and glistening. The specimen is serially sectioned to reveal a 0.2 cm lumen containing blood and a 0.2 cm thick wall. Representative sections are submitted as follows: 1A = entire distal tip bisected longitudinally 1B = representative cross sections including inked proximal margin Edit: So if you have appendicitis I will look for purulent exudate on the serosa, in the appendix itself, and will make sure there isn't a perforation. Edit 2: The sections I submit in cassettes are then processed and cut by histotechs. These small (think micron size sections) are then stained (usually with hematoxylin and eosin) and the pathologist will examine the slide under the scope. They perform the final diagnosis; in the case of appendicitis looking for neutrophils inside the lumen.
28 0 [deleted] The vet hospital of the local university has a chemical vat that they dissolve remains in, should the need arise. From what I understand they only do this if there is some reason which the animal cannot be disposed of by other means. Communicable animal diseases come to mind.
23 0 Withoutastapler I've got a story about the old methods of disposal. For reference, I am an environmental geologist and was working near Flint, MI a few years ago. Had to do a subsurface investigation at one of the vacant hospitals because for 30+ years they dumped all biowaste into an open pit west of the hospital. They filled in the "skin pit" (what my coworkers and I dubbed the dump) in the late 1980s with building debris from an old on-site church, and then paved over it for extra parking. We drilled the pit and found significant contamination, including formaldehyde, in the groundwater. All of the houses down-gradient of the hospital had to connect to city water. Pretty gross considering how long they were drinking that.
18 0 mechooseausernameno Your appendix would go to the pathologist and get fixed in formalin initially so it could then be examined under a microscope to assess the cause. A very small number have tumours. In general most excised organs get sent to pathology before disposal.
15 0 RazorRush Had my wisdom teeth pulled and wanted them. Was told no it's biohazard waste. How did they go from my extra teeth to biohazard in 30 minutes. No one could explain. Did not get them.
27 0 WRSaunders It's special Medical Waste. Yes, they throw them out, like the bloody sponges, unless they need to go to the lab for a biopsy.
3 0 TangoZippo It varies drastically across the world, but medical waste (including removed organs, but also many other forms of medical waste ranging from bloody bandages to used needles) is usually incinerated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomedical_waste
5 0 CoomassieBlues It's not the biggest body part, but I worked in a lab that collected and used foreskins (from circumcisions). Infants tissues can be harvested for stem cells and it turns out cutting off other bits of the baby is commonly considered unethical.
12 0 [deleted] [deleted]
3 0 dog_in_the_vent For the record even though this doesn't really pertain to your question: your appendix is [not totally useless](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008102334.htm) as once thought. It produces gut flora, which is to say bacteria in your digestive tract that help digest food. You can live without it, but it's not useless.