Score
Title
26
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
1376
ELI5 Why does water turn white when going over a waterfall? My 8 year old asked me and I was at a loss to explain.
438
ELI5: how did women shaving their legs/armpits come about and why did men not do it too?
8400
ELI5: Why does a familiar word sound unfamiliar after you overly repeat it?
1210
ELI5: There's 21% oxygen in air. When we breathe out, there's still 16% oxygen in the exhaled air. Why's our lung so inefficient?
110
ELI5: How close to 50/50 are genes from our parents? Is it possible to have more genes from one parent than the other?
174
ELI5 why is there so much activity with the Ring of Fire recently? How do we know which earthquakes are directly linked? Should California be as worried as the media makes out?
13
ELI5: Why does having "good lawyers" get people off with lesser punishments even if they're obviously guilty?
91
ELI5: Why might it be so hard for me to fall asleep again after waking up, but once my alarm goes off and I'm supposed to wake up, I suddenly can't stop hitting snooze and going back to sleep?
4
ELI5: Why is older wine considered "better"?
11
ELI5 How do civil engineers determine if a building is structurally sound after an earthquake?
17
ELI5: Why do we feel tense in our shoulders when we are stressed?
6
ELI5: Why didn't the US experience hyperinflation that many economists and politicians said was going to happen when the FED did its quantitative easing during the Great Recession?
185
ELI5 If symptoms of a cold serve the function of ridding our body of the illness, then do cold medicines that reduce these symptoms slow our recovery?
2
ElI5: How does anesthesia make us unconscious but doesn't harm or shut off unconscious functions?
3
ELI5; why is it that people snore when they are asleep, but don't have the same breathing pattern when awake?
5
ELI5: How can a cable possibly be stretched across the entire Atlantic Ocean?
7693
ELI5 why is it that we always see so many new awesome ways to fight cancer and yet it seems nothing of it is ever being used?
7
ELI5:Banned weapons in war
2732
ELI5: Why is CTE brain damage such a hot topic in the NFL, but don't hear anything from the Rugby community?
5
ELI5 Why do so many conservative groups use the word "Patriot" in their name?
3
ELI5: Why does the ESRB have a "Real Gambling" descriptor if online real-money gambling is illegal in the USA?
2
ELI5 why we tend to raise our voice when we're mad
3
ELI5 How do certain animals have the exact same pattern as a leopard?
5
ELI5: Why do indian people and other asian people have different skin tones despite being so close geographically?
5
ELI5: Why can my body handle heat or cold somedays better than others?
3
ELI5:Why is there such a huge disparity in airline prices (example in text)?
6
ELI5:Why must the Pythagorean Theorem contain squared values? Is there a relationship between sides prior to squaring them?
4
ELI5: Would inflation still happen if the population didn’t increase?
14
ELI5: Why are there still a few operating Blockbusters, and where does the money that they make go?
2
ELI5 - I'm driving on a Rosario with my 5 year old and she asks me how power lines carry electricity
0
ELI5 why can't we smell anything wen having a cold?
93
ELI5: That feeling you get when you’re traveling in a car and you go over a small but quick hill and your stomach has that weird sensation in it right as you reach the top and are hearing back down.
10
ELI5: What exactly is happening when one has water trapped in their ear?
3
ELIF: Why do people in black and white movies and tv shows sound the same?
2
ELI5: How does someone end up in extended domestic captivity and remain there?
1
ELI5: Why aren't service animals regulated by any sort of governing entity?
4
ELI5: Why didn't the confederates ever march on Washington D.C.?
7
ELI5:Why do some books have "This page has been intentionally left blank" page?
2
ELI5: why does a combination of weird scents, audio, and visual stimulation make me feel nauseous?
0
ELI5: How are satellites able to show such high definition photos from outer space
83 zZINCc Pathologists' Assistant and med tech here. When you get a body part removed it will come to the anatomic pathology lab or clinical lab. The clinical lab deals with liquids (blood, urine, spinal fluid, etc.) and microbiology while the anatomic lab is exactly that: for anatomic parts! So if you got your appendix removed it will go the anatomic pathology lab to be "grossed" (measured, described) and sectioned. What we do to the appendix depends on what it was taken out for. No matter what we will snip off the entire distal tip (the end opposite the side that attaches to the cecum) as that can harbor a kind of tumor called a carcinoid tumor. We will then serially section the appendix looking for any abnormalities. What does the lumen contain? Fecal material, fecoliths, blood, pus, nothing? How does the serosa (the outside of the appendix) look? Is it dull and not shiny? Does it have purulent exudate on it or the attached fat (mesoappendix)? Is it torn or is there a perforation? Finally, we look at how thick the wall of the appendix is (they are usually about 0.2 cm thick). A normal gross dictation of your presumably normal appendix that may have been incidentally taken out will look something like this: Received fresh labeled with the patient's name, medical record number, and additionally labeled "appendix" is a 6.5 cm in length by 0.5 cm in diameter appendix with 2.0 cm of attached mesoappendix. The serosa is pink-tan, smooth, and glistening. The specimen is serially sectioned to reveal a 0.2 cm lumen containing blood and a 0.2 cm thick wall. Representative sections are submitted as follows: 1A = entire distal tip bisected longitudinally 1B = representative cross sections including inked proximal margin Edit: So if you have appendicitis I will look for purulent exudate on the serosa, in the appendix itself, and will make sure there isn't a perforation. Edit 2: The sections I submit in cassettes are then processed and cut by histotechs. These small (think micron size sections) are then stained (usually with hematoxylin and eosin) and the pathologist will examine the slide under the scope. They perform the final diagnosis; in the case of appendicitis looking for neutrophils inside the lumen.
250 Reese_Tora Biohazard waste (removed body parts and those disposable tools that come in contact with your blood, for instance) are destroyed in a way that is designed to make sure that no living cells could remain, such as dissolving in chemicals or burning to ash in an incinerator. I would like to point out that body parts that are removed are not necessarily unnecessary- even the appendix, the archetypical useless organ, is currently thought to provide some function (providing a safe store of positive bacteria to re-populate the intestines after something like diarrhea flushes them out)
22 Withoutastapler I've got a story about the old methods of disposal. For reference, I am an environmental geologist and was working near Flint, MI a few years ago. Had to do a subsurface investigation at one of the vacant hospitals because for 30+ years they dumped all biowaste into an open pit west of the hospital. They filled in the "skin pit" (what my coworkers and I dubbed the dump) in the late 1980s with building debris from an old on-site church, and then paved over it for extra parking. We drilled the pit and found significant contamination, including formaldehyde, in the groundwater. All of the houses down-gradient of the hospital had to connect to city water. Pretty gross considering how long they were drinking that.
26 dgoforthedoggo The vet hospital of the local university has a chemical vat that they dissolve remains in, should the need arise. From what I understand they only do this if there is some reason which the animal cannot be disposed of by other means. Communicable animal diseases come to mind.
19 mechooseausernameno Your appendix would go to the pathologist and get fixed in formalin initially so it could then be examined under a microscope to assess the cause. A very small number have tumours. In general most excised organs get sent to pathology before disposal.
15 RazorRush Had my wisdom teeth pulled and wanted them. Was told no it's biohazard waste. How did they go from my extra teeth to biohazard in 30 minutes. No one could explain. Did not get them.
28 WRSaunders It's special Medical Waste. Yes, they throw them out, like the bloody sponges, unless they need to go to the lab for a biopsy.
4 TangoZippo It varies drastically across the world, but medical waste (including removed organs, but also many other forms of medical waste ranging from bloody bandages to used needles) is usually incinerated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomedical_waste
4 CoomassieBlues It's not the biggest body part, but I worked in a lab that collected and used foreskins (from circumcisions). Infants tissues can be harvested for stem cells and it turns out cutting off other bits of the baby is commonly considered unethical.
13 HyperboleJoe Most doctor surgeons are not paid very well and will eat the parts they remove to give them energy for their next part removal.
4 dog_in_the_vent For the record even though this doesn't really pertain to your question: your appendix is [not totally useless](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008102334.htm) as once thought. It produces gut flora, which is to say bacteria in your digestive tract that help digest food. You can live without it, but it's not useless.
5 VeryMuchDutch101 I worked in a hospital and had to collect the *biohazard* waste. The bodypart gets thrown in airtight containers. These are temporarily stored somewhere at the hospital. Then once every x days the biohazard disposal company picks up the containers and burns it.
3 TherapeuticMessage Doctors now think that the appendix plays an important role in maintaining the normal composition of bacteria in the gut by acting as a reservoir. Just thought I’d share that your appendix may not be useless.
81 0 zZINCc Pathologists' Assistant and med tech here. When you get a body part removed it will come to the anatomic pathology lab or clinical lab. The clinical lab deals with liquids (blood, urine, spinal fluid, etc.) and microbiology while the anatomic lab is exactly that: for anatomic parts! So if you got your appendix removed it will go the anatomic pathology lab to be "grossed" (measured, described) and sectioned. What we do to the appendix depends on what it was taken out for. No matter what we will snip off the entire distal tip (the end opposite the side that attaches to the cecum) as that can harbor a kind of tumor called a carcinoid tumor. We will then serially section the appendix looking for any abnormalities. What does the lumen contain? Fecal material, fecoliths, blood, pus, nothing? How does the serosa (the outside of the appendix) look? Is it dull and not shiny? Does it have purulent exudate on it or the attached fat (mesoappendix)? Is it torn or is there a perforation? Finally, we look at how thick the wall of the appendix is (they are usually about 0.2 cm thick). A normal gross dictation of your presumably normal appendix that may have been incidentally taken out will look something like this: Received fresh labeled with the patient's name, medical record number, and additionally labeled "appendix" is a 6.5 cm in length by 0.5 cm in diameter appendix with 2.0 cm of attached mesoappendix. The serosa is pink-tan, smooth, and glistening. The specimen is serially sectioned to reveal a 0.2 cm lumen containing blood and a 0.2 cm thick wall. Representative sections are submitted as follows: 1A = entire distal tip bisected longitudinally 1B = representative cross sections including inked proximal margin Edit: So if you have appendicitis I will look for purulent exudate on the serosa, in the appendix itself, and will make sure there isn't a perforation. Edit 2: The sections I submit in cassettes are then processed and cut by histotechs. These small (think micron size sections) are then stained (usually with hematoxylin and eosin) and the pathologist will examine the slide under the scope. They perform the final diagnosis; in the case of appendicitis looking for neutrophils inside the lumen.
253 0 Reese_Tora Biohazard waste (removed body parts and those disposable tools that come in contact with your blood, for instance) are destroyed in a way that is designed to make sure that no living cells could remain, such as dissolving in chemicals or burning to ash in an incinerator. I would like to point out that body parts that are removed are not necessarily unnecessary- even the appendix, the archetypical useless organ, is currently thought to provide some function (providing a safe store of positive bacteria to re-populate the intestines after something like diarrhea flushes them out)
22 0 Withoutastapler I've got a story about the old methods of disposal. For reference, I am an environmental geologist and was working near Flint, MI a few years ago. Had to do a subsurface investigation at one of the vacant hospitals because for 30+ years they dumped all biowaste into an open pit west of the hospital. They filled in the "skin pit" (what my coworkers and I dubbed the dump) in the late 1980s with building debris from an old on-site church, and then paved over it for extra parking. We drilled the pit and found significant contamination, including formaldehyde, in the groundwater. All of the houses down-gradient of the hospital had to connect to city water. Pretty gross considering how long they were drinking that.
29 0 dgoforthedoggo The vet hospital of the local university has a chemical vat that they dissolve remains in, should the need arise. From what I understand they only do this if there is some reason which the animal cannot be disposed of by other means. Communicable animal diseases come to mind.
18 0 mechooseausernameno Your appendix would go to the pathologist and get fixed in formalin initially so it could then be examined under a microscope to assess the cause. A very small number have tumours. In general most excised organs get sent to pathology before disposal.
14 0 RazorRush Had my wisdom teeth pulled and wanted them. Was told no it's biohazard waste. How did they go from my extra teeth to biohazard in 30 minutes. No one could explain. Did not get them.
28 0 WRSaunders It's special Medical Waste. Yes, they throw them out, like the bloody sponges, unless they need to go to the lab for a biopsy.
4 0 TangoZippo It varies drastically across the world, but medical waste (including removed organs, but also many other forms of medical waste ranging from bloody bandages to used needles) is usually incinerated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomedical_waste
2 0 CoomassieBlues It's not the biggest body part, but I worked in a lab that collected and used foreskins (from circumcisions). Infants tissues can be harvested for stem cells and it turns out cutting off other bits of the baby is commonly considered unethical.
13 0 HyperboleJoe Most doctor surgeons are not paid very well and will eat the parts they remove to give them energy for their next part removal.
4 0 dog_in_the_vent For the record even though this doesn't really pertain to your question: your appendix is [not totally useless](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008102334.htm) as once thought. It produces gut flora, which is to say bacteria in your digestive tract that help digest food. You can live without it, but it's not useless.
2 0 VeryMuchDutch101 I worked in a hospital and had to collect the *biohazard* waste. The bodypart gets thrown in airtight containers. These are temporarily stored somewhere at the hospital. Then once every x days the biohazard disposal company picks up the containers and burns it.
3 0 TherapeuticMessage Doctors now think that the appendix plays an important role in maintaining the normal composition of bacteria in the gut by acting as a reservoir. Just thought I’d share that your appendix may not be useless.