Score
Title
311
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
760
ELI5:How do air breathing sea animals like dolphins or whales not drown during violent seastorms?
20063
ELI5 : Why do we wake up starving the morning after a night of binge eating?
9
ELI5: How a music video is shot in slow motion, but the singer’s lips are synced with the audio
9
ELI5: why is math (statistics, calculus, etc) so important for a strong programmer?
23
ELI5: How does Japanese multiplication work? Why does this work?
18
ELI5: why the value of so many western currencies is roughly equal?
4
[ELI5] How to clearly explain the Monty Hall paradox
6
ELI5: Why do older video games look so angular, like they were pasting faces on the blocks of wood? What changed?
6
ELI5: Approximately how wide is Earth’s “orbit zone” and why is this the case?
2
ELI5: The purpose of Black Friday
2
ELI5: gastrointestinal sounds
3
ELI5: Why the cost of living has increased so much relative to inflation in the U.S.
4
ELI5: Why are the poles so cold?
726
ELI5: They say 70% of taste is smell. When we smell, let's say a public restroom, are we actually inhaling and "tasting" particles?
25
ELI5: Why are my photos horrible and professional photos look amazing? I used to think it's because I don't have a nice professional camera but I've seen pro photos taken with a cell phone and they make mine look like garbage in comparison. What's the deal?
5
ELI5:Why do we not feel food go down our bodies?
10
ELI5: In the case of muscular injuries - why does it hurt more 24-48 hours after, than at the point of injury?
8
ELI5: how do some areas have more than one power supplier since I would assume they would be using the same power lines and infrastructure?
1
ELI5: Why do fridges pop and bang (very loudly)
56
ELI5 When doing the same amount of physical labor, why do some people sweat a lot while others don't?
2
ELI5: The Flux And Gauss's Law
0
ELI5: If temperature is defined by the movement or jiggling of particles like atoms and molecules and if a vacuum is defined by an absent of those particles. How can a vacuum have a temperature?
1
ELI5 : If we have 1440p 120hz screens on phones(the Razer phone),then why can't we have tv sized screens with like 16k that are available for consumers?
1
ELI5: Why do you sometimes have to use the bathroom immediately after you eat or drink even if you didn’t need to before?
1
ELI5: what physically changes in a computer when you save something?
1
ELI5: What is the difference between a root and a rhizome?
1
ELI5: Why does swapping the batteries position in the remote control sometimes give you extra battery life?
1
ELI5: The physics behind this Russian recreational equipment. Link inside
1
ELI5: If tuition remission becomes taxable income under new U.S. House plan, why can't Universities list the cost of PhD programs at $0 a semester?
1
ELI5; why is it that, after a little while, y9u get used to the smells in a particular room or place and can no longer smell it i.e. like a room freshener in your home?
0
ELI5: Why do we sometimes like the smell of our own body odors (gas, armpit odor, tartar, etc.) but get grossed out by the odors of others?
1
ELI5: Does the amount of sucrose in a fruit correlate with its rate of decay?
1
ELI5: Where do the bubbles come from when boiling water?
24
ELI5: Why does our body subconsciously lean forward or stand when there is an intense moment happening (Like during a hard boss fight in gaming)?
1
ELI5: Why is any number to the power of zero 1?
2
ELI5:How dangerous would it be to transfuse blood from a diabetic who has a bad glucose regulation?
0
ELI5: Why do humans enjoy "gatekeeping"?
3
ELI5: The process of adding, changing, or repealing amendments of the U.S. Constitution?
0
ELI5: Could a planet get sucked into the sun?
2
ELI5: What causes different animals to have such different perceptions of time?
253 Reese_Tora Biohazard waste (removed body parts and those disposable tools that come in contact with your blood, for instance) are destroyed in a way that is designed to make sure that no living cells could remain, such as dissolving in chemicals or burning to ash in an incinerator. I would like to point out that body parts that are removed are not necessarily unnecessary- even the appendix, the archetypical useless organ, is currently thought to provide some function (providing a safe store of positive bacteria to re-populate the intestines after something like diarrhea flushes them out)
80 zZINCc Pathologists' Assistant and med tech here. When you get a body part removed it will come to the anatomic pathology lab or clinical lab. The clinical lab deals with liquids (blood, urine, spinal fluid, etc.) and microbiology while the anatomic lab is exactly that: for anatomic parts! So if you got your appendix removed it will go the anatomic pathology lab to be "grossed" (measured, described) and sectioned. What we do to the appendix depends on what it was taken out for. No matter what we will snip off the entire distal tip (the end opposite the side that attaches to the cecum) as that can harbor a kind of tumor called a carcinoid tumor. We will then serially section the appendix looking for any abnormalities. What does the lumen contain? Fecal material, fecoliths, blood, pus, nothing? How does the serosa (the outside of the appendix) look? Is it dull and not shiny? Does it have purulent exudate on it or the attached fat (mesoappendix)? Is it torn or is there a perforation? Finally, we look at how thick the wall of the appendix is (they are usually about 0.2 cm thick). A normal gross dictation of your presumably normal appendix that may have been incidentally taken out will look something like this: Received fresh labeled with the patient's name, medical record number, and additionally labeled "appendix" is a 6.5 cm in length by 0.5 cm in diameter appendix with 2.0 cm of attached mesoappendix. The serosa is pink-tan, smooth, and glistening. The specimen is serially sectioned to reveal a 0.2 cm lumen containing blood and a 0.2 cm thick wall. Representative sections are submitted as follows: 1A = entire distal tip bisected longitudinally 1B = representative cross sections including inked proximal margin Edit: So if you have appendicitis I will look for purulent exudate on the serosa, in the appendix itself, and will make sure there isn't a perforation. Edit 2: The sections I submit in cassettes are then processed and cut by histotechs. These small (think micron size sections) are then stained (usually with hematoxylin and eosin) and the pathologist will examine the slide under the scope. They perform the final diagnosis; in the case of appendicitis looking for neutrophils inside the lumen.
28 [deleted] The vet hospital of the local university has a chemical vat that they dissolve remains in, should the need arise. From what I understand they only do this if there is some reason which the animal cannot be disposed of by other means. Communicable animal diseases come to mind.
24 Withoutastapler I've got a story about the old methods of disposal. For reference, I am an environmental geologist and was working near Flint, MI a few years ago. Had to do a subsurface investigation at one of the vacant hospitals because for 30+ years they dumped all biowaste into an open pit west of the hospital. They filled in the "skin pit" (what my coworkers and I dubbed the dump) in the late 1980s with building debris from an old on-site church, and then paved over it for extra parking. We drilled the pit and found significant contamination, including formaldehyde, in the groundwater. All of the houses down-gradient of the hospital had to connect to city water. Pretty gross considering how long they were drinking that.
19 mechooseausernameno Your appendix would go to the pathologist and get fixed in formalin initially so it could then be examined under a microscope to assess the cause. A very small number have tumours. In general most excised organs get sent to pathology before disposal.
14 RazorRush Had my wisdom teeth pulled and wanted them. Was told no it's biohazard waste. How did they go from my extra teeth to biohazard in 30 minutes. No one could explain. Did not get them.
26 WRSaunders It's special Medical Waste. Yes, they throw them out, like the bloody sponges, unless they need to go to the lab for a biopsy.
3 TangoZippo It varies drastically across the world, but medical waste (including removed organs, but also many other forms of medical waste ranging from bloody bandages to used needles) is usually incinerated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomedical_waste
2 CoomassieBlues It's not the biggest body part, but I worked in a lab that collected and used foreskins (from circumcisions). Infants tissues can be harvested for stem cells and it turns out cutting off other bits of the baby is commonly considered unethical.
12 HyperboleJoe Most doctor surgeons are not paid very well and will eat the parts they remove to give them energy for their next part removal.
4 dog_in_the_vent For the record even though this doesn't really pertain to your question: your appendix is [not totally useless](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008102334.htm) as once thought. It produces gut flora, which is to say bacteria in your digestive tract that help digest food. You can live without it, but it's not useless.
248 0 Reese_Tora Biohazard waste (removed body parts and those disposable tools that come in contact with your blood, for instance) are destroyed in a way that is designed to make sure that no living cells could remain, such as dissolving in chemicals or burning to ash in an incinerator. I would like to point out that body parts that are removed are not necessarily unnecessary- even the appendix, the archetypical useless organ, is currently thought to provide some function (providing a safe store of positive bacteria to re-populate the intestines after something like diarrhea flushes them out)
86 0 zZINCc Pathologists' Assistant and med tech here. When you get a body part removed it will come to the anatomic pathology lab or clinical lab. The clinical lab deals with liquids (blood, urine, spinal fluid, etc.) and microbiology while the anatomic lab is exactly that: for anatomic parts! So if you got your appendix removed it will go the anatomic pathology lab to be "grossed" (measured, described) and sectioned. What we do to the appendix depends on what it was taken out for. No matter what we will snip off the entire distal tip (the end opposite the side that attaches to the cecum) as that can harbor a kind of tumor called a carcinoid tumor. We will then serially section the appendix looking for any abnormalities. What does the lumen contain? Fecal material, fecoliths, blood, pus, nothing? How does the serosa (the outside of the appendix) look? Is it dull and not shiny? Does it have purulent exudate on it or the attached fat (mesoappendix)? Is it torn or is there a perforation? Finally, we look at how thick the wall of the appendix is (they are usually about 0.2 cm thick). A normal gross dictation of your presumably normal appendix that may have been incidentally taken out will look something like this: Received fresh labeled with the patient's name, medical record number, and additionally labeled "appendix" is a 6.5 cm in length by 0.5 cm in diameter appendix with 2.0 cm of attached mesoappendix. The serosa is pink-tan, smooth, and glistening. The specimen is serially sectioned to reveal a 0.2 cm lumen containing blood and a 0.2 cm thick wall. Representative sections are submitted as follows: 1A = entire distal tip bisected longitudinally 1B = representative cross sections including inked proximal margin Edit: So if you have appendicitis I will look for purulent exudate on the serosa, in the appendix itself, and will make sure there isn't a perforation. Edit 2: The sections I submit in cassettes are then processed and cut by histotechs. These small (think micron size sections) are then stained (usually with hematoxylin and eosin) and the pathologist will examine the slide under the scope. They perform the final diagnosis; in the case of appendicitis looking for neutrophils inside the lumen.
27 0 [deleted] The vet hospital of the local university has a chemical vat that they dissolve remains in, should the need arise. From what I understand they only do this if there is some reason which the animal cannot be disposed of by other means. Communicable animal diseases come to mind.
24 0 Withoutastapler I've got a story about the old methods of disposal. For reference, I am an environmental geologist and was working near Flint, MI a few years ago. Had to do a subsurface investigation at one of the vacant hospitals because for 30+ years they dumped all biowaste into an open pit west of the hospital. They filled in the "skin pit" (what my coworkers and I dubbed the dump) in the late 1980s with building debris from an old on-site church, and then paved over it for extra parking. We drilled the pit and found significant contamination, including formaldehyde, in the groundwater. All of the houses down-gradient of the hospital had to connect to city water. Pretty gross considering how long they were drinking that.
19 0 mechooseausernameno Your appendix would go to the pathologist and get fixed in formalin initially so it could then be examined under a microscope to assess the cause. A very small number have tumours. In general most excised organs get sent to pathology before disposal.
14 0 RazorRush Had my wisdom teeth pulled and wanted them. Was told no it's biohazard waste. How did they go from my extra teeth to biohazard in 30 minutes. No one could explain. Did not get them.
28 0 WRSaunders It's special Medical Waste. Yes, they throw them out, like the bloody sponges, unless they need to go to the lab for a biopsy.
4 0 TangoZippo It varies drastically across the world, but medical waste (including removed organs, but also many other forms of medical waste ranging from bloody bandages to used needles) is usually incinerated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biomedical_waste
3 0 CoomassieBlues It's not the biggest body part, but I worked in a lab that collected and used foreskins (from circumcisions). Infants tissues can be harvested for stem cells and it turns out cutting off other bits of the baby is commonly considered unethical.
12 0 HyperboleJoe Most doctor surgeons are not paid very well and will eat the parts they remove to give them energy for their next part removal.
5 0 dog_in_the_vent For the record even though this doesn't really pertain to your question: your appendix is [not totally useless](https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008102334.htm) as once thought. It produces gut flora, which is to say bacteria in your digestive tract that help digest food. You can live without it, but it's not useless.