Score
Title
616
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
3274
ELI5: How is magnesium, an easily flammable metal used in flares, used to make products such as car parts and computer casings?
9901
ELI5: Why do LED lights look jittery or like they're strobing when you look at them quickly?
109
ELI5: What is the Speed of a Photon as it Gets Reflected by a Mirror?
77
ELI5: What is the difference between a tort and a crime?
9
ELI5:If you put water into an unbreakable container and froze it, what would happen?
6
ELI5: Does a person age slower living on the equator than the arctic circle due to traveling faster in the same amount of time?
6
ELI5: Why do lines appear in the picture when you photograph a computer screen?
5
ELI5: If one company buys out another company for a monetary fee, wouldn’t the money go back to the parent company, therefore the parent company essentially gained capital for free since they own the other company? How does that work?
4
ELI5: How the speed of light is constant in all reference frames
8
ELI5: Plants vs Fungi
3
ELI5: What is an RSS Feed?
3
ELI5:Why would the government produce a record of all the CIA's wrong doing?
5
ELI5: Why does freshly squeezed orange juice taste so different from orange juice in a carton?
4
ELI5: Why is the standard deviation of the sampling distribution less than the standard deviation of the population?
3
ELI5: how can Washington Lake (freshwater) exist on Teraina (middle of the Pacific Ocean)?
2
ELI5: Why does it become nearly impossible to hold your bladder when you are near to the bathroom?
4
ELI5: Why didn’t any astronomers see the meteor that went past Michigan?
3
ELI5: what is a bond investment in relation to a Roth IRA?
2
ELI5:How come a person's signature is needed when paying with a credit card if the staff doesn't check it?
5
ELI5: Why is sound measured in decibels? Is it logarithmic?
3
ELI5: zipped files
1
ELI5: How can projector produce a black image.
1
ELI5: Why do conduction and valence bands occur?
2
ELI5: Why does liquid bubble when it boils?
1
ELI5: Why do you get cramps when you drink water really fast and exercise/run?
6
ELI5:What is the difference between Term life and Whole life insurance?
2
ELI5: Bank of Canada Interest Rate: Why do they raise it, why is it good to raise it (and who for), and why can’t they leave it at 0%?
1
ELI5: Why is it more difficult to wake up when its raining/cloudy outside?
3
ELI5: Why is it that when we try to remember something in the past, it sometimes takes a minute to actually recollect it? What is our brain doing during that time?
1
ELI5: How do the etymologies of the words 'deductive'-, 'inductive'- and 'abductive'- reasoning fit in with their definitions?
0
ELI5: How do guitar pickups avoid picking up other vibrations and background noise?
1
ELI5: Linking cars together like a train to go up a hill collectively more effective than going by your car’s power singularly
1
ELI5: The difference between square rooting and simplified square rooting?
3
ELI5: Why do cars slightly move up when your foot isn’t touching the gas pedal?
3
ELI5: Why is our bodies reacting like it is to drugs like heroin.
3
ELI5: How do I calculate these probability situations if my math skills end around algebra?
7
ELI5:Why do certain colors of lights have a second, differently colored ring around the source?
2
ELI5: How do Bionic Ears work?
1
ELI5: What is an Exchange-Traded Fund?
1
ELI5: Why is deer meat described as “gamey”? What does “gamey” mean?
6 [deleted] [deleted]
3 unaskedforopinion Keep in mind currency is only as valuable as the confidence behind it, so backing currency with gold says "hey, if you want to, you can turn this in for gold, so believe me, you can trust it." How did gold become the standard: 1) It's rare, not easy to acquire. Figures of over 70 tons or raw ore to process resulting in one ounce are not unheard of, and less than 5 tons to gain an ounce is considered very rich ore. 2) People agree that it is attractive. 3) It is VERY useful for plating, designing, decorating, you can flatten gold so thin that a one inch square of it can easily float in the air and take a long time to land. Which means you can convert it into jewelry, gold plated items, which people find attractive and they want it. 4) It has many uses in manufacturing. Edit: 5) it's very compact, dense, easy to transport and hold.
1 cdb03b No country in the world uses gold to back their currencies anymore. All world currencies are fiat currencies currently meaning they are only backed by governmental power.
1 edman007 Gold has always been a useful metal, it doesn't corrode, it's soft, and it looks nice. There has always been demand for it because of that. It use to be used to back money because there was significant demand (giving it value), and it was sufficiently difficult to obtain its price remained high. In effect, the first anti-foraging measure was simply to pick something difficult to obtain, so gold coins couldn't be forged (it would require mining and refining gold, a process so difficult that you wasted enough time to to equal the value of gold you go). It's not like modern coins that cost just a few cents to make and have a face value far higher. That kind of anti-forgery effect is really what drove gold to be the standard for money. Now we have floating currencies. It's backed by the goverment (they simply say if you have the cash I'll pay), and it's value is controlled by adjusting how banks (especially the central bank) deal with loans (specifically, when you deposit money into a bank, the bank can loan it to someone else while keeping it in your account, this creates money since you both have the money). Governments also issue bonds which can have some effect as well (they take money from the people and spend it, and pay them back with interest later)
1 Concise_Pirate Did ye ferget ta search? www.google.com/search?q=eli5+why+gold+valuable It's a VERY common question here, matey.
6 0 [deleted] [deleted]
3 0 unaskedforopinion Keep in mind currency is only as valuable as the confidence behind it, so backing currency with gold says "hey, if you want to, you can turn this in for gold, so believe me, you can trust it." How did gold become the standard: 1) It's rare, not easy to acquire. Figures of over 70 tons or raw ore to process resulting in one ounce are not unheard of, and less than 5 tons to gain an ounce is considered very rich ore. 2) People agree that it is attractive. 3) It is VERY useful for plating, designing, decorating, you can flatten gold so thin that a one inch square of it can easily float in the air and take a long time to land. Which means you can convert it into jewelry, gold plated items, which people find attractive and they want it. 4) It has many uses in manufacturing. Edit: 5) it's very compact, dense, easy to transport and hold.
1 0 cdb03b No country in the world uses gold to back their currencies anymore. All world currencies are fiat currencies currently meaning they are only backed by governmental power.
1 0 edman007 Gold has always been a useful metal, it doesn't corrode, it's soft, and it looks nice. There has always been demand for it because of that. It use to be used to back money because there was significant demand (giving it value), and it was sufficiently difficult to obtain its price remained high. In effect, the first anti-foraging measure was simply to pick something difficult to obtain, so gold coins couldn't be forged (it would require mining and refining gold, a process so difficult that you wasted enough time to to equal the value of gold you go). It's not like modern coins that cost just a few cents to make and have a face value far higher. That kind of anti-forgery effect is really what drove gold to be the standard for money. Now we have floating currencies. It's backed by the goverment (they simply say if you have the cash I'll pay), and it's value is controlled by adjusting how banks (especially the central bank) deal with loans (specifically, when you deposit money into a bank, the bank can loan it to someone else while keeping it in your account, this creates money since you both have the money). Governments also issue bonds which can have some effect as well (they take money from the people and spend it, and pay them back with interest later)
1 0 Concise_Pirate Did ye ferget ta search? www.google.com/search?q=eli5+why+gold+valuable It's a VERY common question here, matey.