Score
Title
311
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
760
ELI5:How do air breathing sea animals like dolphins or whales not drown during violent seastorms?
20063
ELI5 : Why do we wake up starving the morning after a night of binge eating?
9
ELI5: How a music video is shot in slow motion, but the singer’s lips are synced with the audio
9
ELI5: why is math (statistics, calculus, etc) so important for a strong programmer?
23
ELI5: How does Japanese multiplication work? Why does this work?
18
ELI5: why the value of so many western currencies is roughly equal?
4
[ELI5] How to clearly explain the Monty Hall paradox
6
ELI5: Why do older video games look so angular, like they were pasting faces on the blocks of wood? What changed?
6
ELI5: Approximately how wide is Earth’s “orbit zone” and why is this the case?
2
ELI5: The purpose of Black Friday
2
ELI5: gastrointestinal sounds
3
ELI5: Why the cost of living has increased so much relative to inflation in the U.S.
4
ELI5: Why are the poles so cold?
726
ELI5: They say 70% of taste is smell. When we smell, let's say a public restroom, are we actually inhaling and "tasting" particles?
25
ELI5: Why are my photos horrible and professional photos look amazing? I used to think it's because I don't have a nice professional camera but I've seen pro photos taken with a cell phone and they make mine look like garbage in comparison. What's the deal?
5
ELI5:Why do we not feel food go down our bodies?
10
ELI5: In the case of muscular injuries - why does it hurt more 24-48 hours after, than at the point of injury?
8
ELI5: how do some areas have more than one power supplier since I would assume they would be using the same power lines and infrastructure?
1
ELI5: Why do fridges pop and bang (very loudly)
56
ELI5 When doing the same amount of physical labor, why do some people sweat a lot while others don't?
2
ELI5: The Flux And Gauss's Law
0
ELI5: If temperature is defined by the movement or jiggling of particles like atoms and molecules and if a vacuum is defined by an absent of those particles. How can a vacuum have a temperature?
1
ELI5 : If we have 1440p 120hz screens on phones(the Razer phone),then why can't we have tv sized screens with like 16k that are available for consumers?
1
ELI5: Why do you sometimes have to use the bathroom immediately after you eat or drink even if you didn’t need to before?
1
ELI5: what physically changes in a computer when you save something?
1
ELI5: What is the difference between a root and a rhizome?
1
ELI5: Why does swapping the batteries position in the remote control sometimes give you extra battery life?
1
ELI5: The physics behind this Russian recreational equipment. Link inside
1
ELI5: If tuition remission becomes taxable income under new U.S. House plan, why can't Universities list the cost of PhD programs at $0 a semester?
1
ELI5; why is it that, after a little while, y9u get used to the smells in a particular room or place and can no longer smell it i.e. like a room freshener in your home?
0
ELI5: Why do we sometimes like the smell of our own body odors (gas, armpit odor, tartar, etc.) but get grossed out by the odors of others?
1
ELI5: Does the amount of sucrose in a fruit correlate with its rate of decay?
1
ELI5: Where do the bubbles come from when boiling water?
24
ELI5: Why does our body subconsciously lean forward or stand when there is an intense moment happening (Like during a hard boss fight in gaming)?
1
ELI5: Why is any number to the power of zero 1?
2
ELI5:How dangerous would it be to transfuse blood from a diabetic who has a bad glucose regulation?
0
ELI5: Why do humans enjoy "gatekeeping"?
3
ELI5: The process of adding, changing, or repealing amendments of the U.S. Constitution?
0
ELI5: Could a planet get sucked into the sun?
2
ELI5: What causes different animals to have such different perceptions of time?
6 [deleted] [deleted]
3 unaskedforopinion Keep in mind currency is only as valuable as the confidence behind it, so backing currency with gold says "hey, if you want to, you can turn this in for gold, so believe me, you can trust it." How did gold become the standard: 1) It's rare, not easy to acquire. Figures of over 70 tons or raw ore to process resulting in one ounce are not unheard of, and less than 5 tons to gain an ounce is considered very rich ore. 2) People agree that it is attractive. 3) It is VERY useful for plating, designing, decorating, you can flatten gold so thin that a one inch square of it can easily float in the air and take a long time to land. Which means you can convert it into jewelry, gold plated items, which people find attractive and they want it. 4) It has many uses in manufacturing. Edit: 5) it's very compact, dense, easy to transport and hold.
1 cdb03b No country in the world uses gold to back their currencies anymore. All world currencies are fiat currencies currently meaning they are only backed by governmental power.
1 edman007 Gold has always been a useful metal, it doesn't corrode, it's soft, and it looks nice. There has always been demand for it because of that. It use to be used to back money because there was significant demand (giving it value), and it was sufficiently difficult to obtain its price remained high. In effect, the first anti-foraging measure was simply to pick something difficult to obtain, so gold coins couldn't be forged (it would require mining and refining gold, a process so difficult that you wasted enough time to to equal the value of gold you go). It's not like modern coins that cost just a few cents to make and have a face value far higher. That kind of anti-forgery effect is really what drove gold to be the standard for money. Now we have floating currencies. It's backed by the goverment (they simply say if you have the cash I'll pay), and it's value is controlled by adjusting how banks (especially the central bank) deal with loans (specifically, when you deposit money into a bank, the bank can loan it to someone else while keeping it in your account, this creates money since you both have the money). Governments also issue bonds which can have some effect as well (they take money from the people and spend it, and pay them back with interest later)
1 Concise_Pirate Did ye ferget ta search? www.google.com/search?q=eli5+why+gold+valuable It's a VERY common question here, matey.
7 0 [deleted] [deleted]
3 0 unaskedforopinion Keep in mind currency is only as valuable as the confidence behind it, so backing currency with gold says "hey, if you want to, you can turn this in for gold, so believe me, you can trust it." How did gold become the standard: 1) It's rare, not easy to acquire. Figures of over 70 tons or raw ore to process resulting in one ounce are not unheard of, and less than 5 tons to gain an ounce is considered very rich ore. 2) People agree that it is attractive. 3) It is VERY useful for plating, designing, decorating, you can flatten gold so thin that a one inch square of it can easily float in the air and take a long time to land. Which means you can convert it into jewelry, gold plated items, which people find attractive and they want it. 4) It has many uses in manufacturing. Edit: 5) it's very compact, dense, easy to transport and hold.
1 0 cdb03b No country in the world uses gold to back their currencies anymore. All world currencies are fiat currencies currently meaning they are only backed by governmental power.
1 0 edman007 Gold has always been a useful metal, it doesn't corrode, it's soft, and it looks nice. There has always been demand for it because of that. It use to be used to back money because there was significant demand (giving it value), and it was sufficiently difficult to obtain its price remained high. In effect, the first anti-foraging measure was simply to pick something difficult to obtain, so gold coins couldn't be forged (it would require mining and refining gold, a process so difficult that you wasted enough time to to equal the value of gold you go). It's not like modern coins that cost just a few cents to make and have a face value far higher. That kind of anti-forgery effect is really what drove gold to be the standard for money. Now we have floating currencies. It's backed by the goverment (they simply say if you have the cash I'll pay), and it's value is controlled by adjusting how banks (especially the central bank) deal with loans (specifically, when you deposit money into a bank, the bank can loan it to someone else while keeping it in your account, this creates money since you both have the money). Governments also issue bonds which can have some effect as well (they take money from the people and spend it, and pay them back with interest later)
1 0 Concise_Pirate Did ye ferget ta search? www.google.com/search?q=eli5+why+gold+valuable It's a VERY common question here, matey.