Score
Title
625
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
1366
ELI5: Why do microscopic organisms (bacteria etc.) look like they're CGI under a microscope.
7
ELI5: Our body fight diseases by increasing the temperature, why betraying it by cooling ourselves down?
92
ELI5: Behaviorism and how it is used to teach/educate children
4
Eli5: Why do humans have different voices?
6
ELI5: if human skin cells reproduce and you essentially have different skin than you did 5 years ago, why do scars never disappear?
5
ELI5:How do bacteria photosynthesize if they don't have membrane bound organelles (chloroplasts)?
3
ELIF: What is the source of heat for the Earths core?
3
ELI5:What makes an MR layout car more likely to oversteer?
2
ELI5: What's the difference between a savings and checking account and is it important?
2
ELI5: What is the science behind ‘beer goggles’?
2
ELI5: Why is the Earth's core so hot? If the sun went out, would the core's remain hot without the sun's energy?
1
ELI5: What happens to our muscles when we 'pull' our neck?
2
ELI5:Numbers Stations
2
ELI5: why does sugar look like a rock and make rock candy if it comes from a plant?
6
ELI5:Why can't humans hold themselves perfectly still without twitching, hence the difficulty of the game "operation"?
4
ELI5: How were cartoons in the early 2000's animated?
5
ELI5: Why are the numbers on super market scales arranged counter clockwise?
2
ELI5: Why is Denuvo still a thing when people are constantly pirating games that use it?
5
ELI5 - What is code and how does it work?
3
ELI5: The difference between nerves and neurons.
11
ELI5:How do our bodies acclimate to hot/cold temperatures?
18
ELI5: Why do Third World Countries have problems with possessing water, when the earth is 79% of it and we have the technology to purify water?
3
ELI5: How do scientists accurately reconstruct the faces of archeologically recovered skulls?
0
ELI5: why does cigarette smoke give people lung cancer and kill them but weed smoke doesn't?
0
ELI5: Why can't you cheat the lottery by doing this?
1
ELI5: Why is GRILLED chicken healthy and fried chicken not?
0
ELI5: Why are members of the armed services credited with upholding American Freedom?
1
ELI5:what is DOM elements and how it works in a web page?
1
ELI5: The controversy and theory of Jordan Peterson.
1
ELI5: Why is medical cannabis not normally used, when morphine is freely accepted?
0
ELI5: Are the odds of a baby being a boy always 50/50?
0
ELI5: What happens if you run away from police in a car and get away?
1
ELI5: If we cannot technically touch anything because the particles we’re made of repel each other, what’s in the space between them?
2
ELI5: why is the speed of earth slowest when it is farthest away from the sun in the elliptical path and vice versa?
0
ELI5: Why hasn’t Quebec gone independent yet?
0
ELI5: how do they make crisps taste like actual flavours?
3
ELI5 why things get black as they combust?
1
ELI5: Aspect ratio and dimensions
2
ELI5: How does sandboxing (computer security) work?
2
ELI5: images(math)
9 accidentallybrill * Hardness: Scratch-ability. If it wears or rubs against another material, does it wear out or does the other thing wear out? Chalk is one of the softest materials, diamond is one of the hardest. * Toughness: How quickly it can absorb a lot of energy. Example: you hit it with a hammer: Not tough, it shatters (diamond). Very tough, the hammer goes 'clunk' (magnesium steel). Toughness is also called Impact Strength. Dropping your laptop is also an example of material toughness at work. (Protip: do not attempt) * Young's Modulus: Stiffness. Very low modulus means the material is flexible and can stretch (weak plastic). Very high modulus means the material is stiff and does not bend at all (tungsten carbide). Something that is very stiff but not strong is "brittle". * Strength: There are several varieties of strength but they refer to how much force can be applied THROUGH the material. The way to measure this is force per area. The area used is the cross section of the thinnest part of where the force will be pushing or pulling through the thing you're examining. Force per area is pressure, so strength is measured in Pounds per Square Inch (PSI), Kilopounds per Square Inch (KSI) and MegaPascals (MPa). * Yield Strength: how much force does it take for the material to begin to bend or stretch *permanently*. (As far as most designs go, most kinds of things "are broken" if they reach the Yield point. A bent screw isn't shattered, but it can't do its job properly any more.) If you press on a paperclip, the maximum amount of push you can apply BEFORE it actually begins to change shape is its Yield Strength. * Ultimate Strength: how much force does it take for the material to break into pieces. (Some materials, like rubber, don't have a yield strength. They just flex and flex and flex and suddenly fail.) Bending a ruler until it snaps is an example of ultimate strength for that ruler. * Yield Limit: how much force does it take for the material to bend or stretch, AND still be able to return to its original shape. (Example: squishing a plastic cup in your hand, but not to the point where it snaps the rim.) Different directions of forces have different names, and have different strength measurements associated with them. * Tensile - pulling. How much force does it take to pull a thing until it bends or breaks. * Compression - pushing or squishing. How much force does it take to squash a thing. * Bending - self explanatory. * Buckling - bending caused by compression of thinner parts. * Shear - cutting action, or being pulled and pushed at the same time near the same place in opposite directions It gets more complicated (i.e. worse) the deeper you go. I haven't even mentioned *plasticity* or *stress*, and forces can be far more complicated than just the five I mentioned.
10 0 accidentallybrill * Hardness: Scratch-ability. If it wears or rubs against another material, does it wear out or does the other thing wear out? Chalk is one of the softest materials, diamond is one of the hardest. * Toughness: How quickly it can absorb a lot of energy. Example: you hit it with a hammer: Not tough, it shatters (diamond). Very tough, the hammer goes 'clunk' (magnesium steel). Toughness is also called Impact Strength. Dropping your laptop is also an example of material toughness at work. (Protip: do not attempt) * Young's Modulus: Stiffness. Very low modulus means the material is flexible and can stretch (weak plastic). Very high modulus means the material is stiff and does not bend at all (tungsten carbide). Something that is very stiff but not strong is "brittle". * Strength: There are several varieties of strength but they refer to how much force can be applied THROUGH the material. The way to measure this is force per area. The area used is the cross section of the thinnest part of where the force will be pushing or pulling through the thing you're examining. Force per area is pressure, so strength is measured in Pounds per Square Inch (PSI), Kilopounds per Square Inch (KSI) and MegaPascals (MPa). * Yield Strength: how much force does it take for the material to begin to bend or stretch *permanently*. (As far as most designs go, most kinds of things "are broken" if they reach the Yield point. A bent screw isn't shattered, but it can't do its job properly any more.) If you press on a paperclip, the maximum amount of push you can apply BEFORE it actually begins to change shape is its Yield Strength. * Ultimate Strength: how much force does it take for the material to break into pieces. (Some materials, like rubber, don't have a yield strength. They just flex and flex and flex and suddenly fail.) Bending a ruler until it snaps is an example of ultimate strength for that ruler. * Yield Limit: how much force does it take for the material to bend or stretch, AND still be able to return to its original shape. (Example: squishing a plastic cup in your hand, but not to the point where it snaps the rim.) Different directions of forces have different names, and have different strength measurements associated with them. * Tensile - pulling. How much force does it take to pull a thing until it bends or breaks. * Compression - pushing or squishing. How much force does it take to squash a thing. * Bending - self explanatory. * Buckling - bending caused by compression of thinner parts. * Shear - cutting action, or being pulled and pushed at the same time near the same place in opposite directions It gets more complicated (i.e. worse) the deeper you go. I haven't even mentioned *plasticity* or *stress*, and forces can be far more complicated than just the five I mentioned.