Score
Title
868
How To Search ELI5: A Quick Reminder About Rule 7
14635
ELI5: Why do cars travel in packs on the highway, even when there are no traffic stops to create groups?
8
ELI5 Retarded Time
5
ELI5:Why is eating healthy 80% of being healthy?
3
ELI5: Why are our fingertips, ear holes and nostrils all approximately the same size?
3
ELI5: Why do animals appear to care so much for their young, but not so much when the 'children' get older?
4
ELI5: Why do our eyes lose focus after staring at something for a while?
17
ELI5: SD. SS. SA. Gestapo. Wehrmacht. Sipo. Kripo. What were they all and how do they relate to each other?
10
ELI5: How many ants does it take to make a functioning ant colony?
3
ELI5:How some stars become pulsars?
5
ELI5: Objectively, what are the limitations of carbon dating?
3
ELI5; What is the difference between a break and a fracture?
5
ELI5: Air movement in a house
4
ELI5: How can sperm cells "swim" through something as thick as seminal fluid? You wouldn't be able to swim through honey for example.
4
ELI5: Why can't there be an "universe's point of reference" in relativism?
5
ELI5: Why/how can most species of animals hold their breath underwater for far longer than humans can?
2
ELI5:What causes us to cry in real life when we are crying when we are sleeping?
4
ELI5: How are we able to track debris in low earth orbit so effectively?
3
ELI5: If I use the same amount of coffee grounds but more water, does my caffeine content change?
9
ELI5: Why are cones and pyramids exactly 1/3 of a cylinder or prism's volume?
5
ELI5: What causes exhausts to have that rasp-y sound people tend to associate with tuners? (civics, integras, etc)
2
ELI5: Why is it stated sharks will suffocate if they quit swimming, but I see examples like the white-tipped reef shark who spend the day laying on the bottom?
15
ELI5: When and why did 8 hours of sleep become the standard for a solid night’s rest?
3
ELI5: Why do you always close your eyes while sneezing?
8
ELI5: Why sliding a knife makes a better cut than just pressing it down?
1
ELI5: How a bong works
1
ELI5: Why is it easier to drink from a paper cup than from a glass mug when moving in a car?
43
ELI5: How come smart phones can run intense games without a fan and still not burn the CPU, but a desktop computer can't even load the desktop for more than a few minutes without permanent damage?
1
ELI5: Why do jet skis/jet boats work better when the nozzle is not in the water?
3
ELI5: What is "Mother's Intuition" and/or is it real?
2
ELI5: What causes us to perceive words that we use everyday as mispelled or mispronounced when they actually aren't?
1
ELI5: Why is the term "Patient Zero" instead of "Patient One?"
0
ELI5: How are glasses lenses put into and taken out of the frame without breaking them?
1
ELI5: What does it mean when the European Parliament adopts a report?
4
ELI5: Why Do Hot Things, E.G. Fire, Molten Materials Tend To Emit Light?
2
ELI5:I know from the local game magazine that elk are hunted in PA, however this map from wikipedia shows the entire state as "former" elk range. What criteria are used to determine this if there can still be elk in former ranges?
1
ELI5: Which pixel colors are shown when a high resolution video is played on a low resolution screen?
36
ELI5: Why is ?4 = -2 false?
2
ELI5: Why do bank cheques only have account name?
8
ELI5: Why do certain types of noise enhance our abilities to focus and study whereas others don't?
127
ELI5: If we breathe in O2 and use the oxygen, how do we release CO2? The same ammount of oxygen we took in, just an added carbon atom
13 agate_ There's no generally-agreed-upon difference. Some universities that offer both have slightly different requirements, but many schools offer only one or the other for historical reasons, and as a practical matter, graduate schools and most employers treat them identically. I have a Bachelor of Arts in physics; an acquaintaince of mine has a Bachelor of Science in creative writing.
5 hyperbemily It has to do with the core requirements you take. For a BA you usually have to take a specific amount of credits of a language as well as more college of liberal arts classes, while a BS has more math and science. Often schools have multiple paths for each so you can choose what really is the right one for you.
5 ameoba "Arts" in this sense isn't stuff like drawing and painting - the *liberal arts* consist of things like literature, history and the like. "Science" OTOH consists of things based strongly in math. In most American universities, most programs only have a BA or a BS option, depending on the subject matter. When you do have an option, the BS will have more math/science requirements while the BA gives you more freedom to pick electives or an unrelated minor.
3 B33tlegirl My degree is studio art with an art history minor, but it is a Bachelor of Science degree as I did not take 2yrs of foreign language.
2 sabatoa Bachelor of Science degrees are more specialized in the field, while Bachelor of Arts degrees have more generalized requirements. The BS class requirements are more specifically geared towards the major, the BA class requirements are generally more well-rounded. I have a BS in Health Administration. It's similar to a BA in Business, but hyper-focused on the business of healthcare.
1 nerd866 In my experience a BA tends to focus around an "arts" major - something not in the hard sciences. A BA student will take a bunch of courses in the field of their major, as well as a large number of optional courses from other Arts fields (psychology, philosophy, history, languages, literature, sociology, classics, music, etc.). A BA student needs to take a couple of science courses but usually only 1 or 2. A BS student is the inverse of that. Their major will be in a hard science or engineering. Their optional courses will be in other sciences outside their major (a chemistry student may take a physics option for example). They will only need 1 or 2 courses in the arts fields.
1 kouhoutek There is a weak trend for a BS to be sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and a BA to be not-sciences (History, English, Philosophy). But mostly it is an evolutionary process based on how the university was initially set up, and how the various departments in the university evolved as new programs were added. If the new Economics program as an offshoot of Math, it might be part of the Sciences program, if it came from Business, it could be Arts instead. Or it could have come from the Bavarian Folk Dancing department because that is what some wealthy patron wanted.
12 0 agate_ There's no generally-agreed-upon difference. Some universities that offer both have slightly different requirements, but many schools offer only one or the other for historical reasons, and as a practical matter, graduate schools and most employers treat them identically. I have a Bachelor of Arts in physics; an acquaintaince of mine has a Bachelor of Science in creative writing.
5 0 hyperbemily It has to do with the core requirements you take. For a BA you usually have to take a specific amount of credits of a language as well as more college of liberal arts classes, while a BS has more math and science. Often schools have multiple paths for each so you can choose what really is the right one for you.
3 0 ameoba "Arts" in this sense isn't stuff like drawing and painting - the *liberal arts* consist of things like literature, history and the like. "Science" OTOH consists of things based strongly in math. In most American universities, most programs only have a BA or a BS option, depending on the subject matter. When you do have an option, the BS will have more math/science requirements while the BA gives you more freedom to pick electives or an unrelated minor.
3 0 B33tlegirl My degree is studio art with an art history minor, but it is a Bachelor of Science degree as I did not take 2yrs of foreign language.
2 0 sabatoa Bachelor of Science degrees are more specialized in the field, while Bachelor of Arts degrees have more generalized requirements. The BS class requirements are more specifically geared towards the major, the BA class requirements are generally more well-rounded. I have a BS in Health Administration. It's similar to a BA in Business, but hyper-focused on the business of healthcare.
1 0 nerd866 In my experience a BA tends to focus around an "arts" major - something not in the hard sciences. A BA student will take a bunch of courses in the field of their major, as well as a large number of optional courses from other Arts fields (psychology, philosophy, history, languages, literature, sociology, classics, music, etc.). A BA student needs to take a couple of science courses but usually only 1 or 2. A BS student is the inverse of that. Their major will be in a hard science or engineering. Their optional courses will be in other sciences outside their major (a chemistry student may take a physics option for example). They will only need 1 or 2 courses in the arts fields.
1 0 kouhoutek There is a weak trend for a BS to be sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and a BA to be not-sciences (History, English, Philosophy). But mostly it is an evolutionary process based on how the university was initially set up, and how the various departments in the university evolved as new programs were added. If the new Economics program as an offshoot of Math, it might be part of the Sciences program, if it came from Business, it could be Arts instead. Or it could have come from the Bavarian Folk Dancing department because that is what some wealthy patron wanted.