Score
Title
27007
Kid orders bong. Package arrives and his mom wants to see him open it.
20893
Northern lights in iceland.
61487
My attempt at a banana for scale picture of my mini dachshund Rusty. It seems like he had other plans
58672
The 24 hour Taco Bell that got me and my friends through college tragically burned down last night. We're coping the best we can.
83237
Finally redone correctly.
33406
First Look at Nintendo Labo
10983
When I ask my friend with Parkinson's how big the fish he caught was
45830
Pornhub traffic in Hawaii during the "missile alert"
6297
Allow me to show you the dance of my people
65596
Four stars
4527
Let me sit down with no view of where I'm going and use my phone while operating a boat, WCGW?
21250
"BEWARE of DOG"
7851
Watch "First Look at Nintendo Labo" on YouTube
30321
Kimbal Musk — Elon’s brother — is leading a $25 million mission to fix food in schools across the US: “in 300 public schools in American cities. Part-playground, part-outdoor classroom, the learning gardens serve as spaces where students learn about the science of growing fruits and veggies“
23632
Bambi gives kitty a bath
46036
Why can't I see anything?
10232
Enter the Unknown
14470
She literally got money through crowdfunding to go to business school.
7348
My favorite shot from the prequels
42816
Students cheer when electricity finally restored to a school in Puerto Rico months after Hurricane Maria
8497
HMC while I don't drop the beer
2970
YOU DON'T CALL ME...
11771
Man clears his name 40 years later after googling corrupt police officer who framed him
4244
Mike D Says Beastie Boys Memoir Is Coming Out This Year
3315
Bath tub: 1 | Curious cat: 0
26171
How they train drug-sniffer puppies
5198
Ken M on
5906
First Photo of Zac Efron as Ted Bundy in ‘Extremely Wicked’
26787
Salt and pepper up close
17896
Four-horned Jacob skull in the anatomy museum of the Royal Veterinary College in London
47762
TIL that some guy attempted to beat a world record by playing QBert for 100 hours straight on a single coin... His attempt failed because a thunderstorm shorted out the game after 56.5 hours of continuous game play!
21337
Splitting the Red Sea
20127
Cloudy Mornings Featuring Fitz Roy - El Chalten, Patagonia. [OC] [3992 X 2992]
52748
USPS bent my diploma. I have no words.
10115
I had honestly never read the show’s entire Wikipedia. Lost it.
6455
The Hori Onyx is the first wireless third-party PS4 controller
90764
Beware of Dog
19645
How to racially profile your new neighbor
3822
Adam Ellis may improve now
9523
Hard line stance on flat tires.
1 shiruken Welcome to /r/science! You may see more removed comments in this thread than you are used to seeing elsewhere on reddit. On /r/science we have [strict comment rules](https://www.reddit.com/r/science/wiki/rules#wiki_comment_rules) designed to keep the discussion on topic and about the posted study and related research. This means that comments that attempt to confirm/deny the research with personal anecdotes, jokes, memes, or other off-topic or low-effort comments are likely to be removed (Yes, we all get that you want to be male sea turtles now). Because it can be frustrating to type out a comment only to have it removed or to come to a thread looking for discussion and see lots of removed comments, please take time to review our comment rules before posting. If you're looking for a place to have a more relaxed discussion of science-related breakthroughs and news, check out our sister subreddit /r/EverythingScience.
26564 99trumpets I study sea turtles. First, a minor clarification to the title - sex ratio is highly female-skewed *at certain beaches.* It has always been the case that some beaches closer to the equator (warmer beaches) produce predominantly females, while other beaches farther from the equator, especially the “polar-most” beaches at the very fringe of the nesting range for certain species, produce mostly males. For instance in the US it has long been the case that southern Florida beaches produce mostly females while the North Carolina area produces most of the males (for loggerheads & greens). What’s happening now is a sudden skew in ratios at both types of beaches, the mostly-female beaches going to all-female and the mostly-male beaches going to approx 50:50. The question is, can sea turtles alter nest depth or shift “polarward” to establish new male-producing nest sites, i.e. colonizing new beaches that haven’t been used before. Some recent studies have found that females at the “hot” beaches are indeed digging deeper (cooler) nests, apparently in a response to sand temperature, but that this is only partially effective (i.e. even the deep nests produce mostly females. Those deeper nests do produce a couple more males, but not enough to ensure optimum fertility of all females). However, sea turtles are also shifting their range. For instance in the US, Assateague Island (Maryland) just had its first loggerhead nest, which produced 100 hatchlings, likely predominantly males. Kemp’s ridleys too are coming out of the Gulf of Mexico & starting to move up the eastern seaboard, and encouragingly Texas had a record number of Kemp’s nests last year (they usually nest in Mexico). But a considerable problem here is that turtles are moving into areas that have not historically had them and that therefore don’t have basic protections set up to help nesting turtles. Cape Cod has been overwhelmed by a huge influx of young Kemp’s ridleys that end up stranded on the northern shore, in enormous numbers recently. Re nest habitat generally though, sandy beaches are usually intensely developed for human recreation and baby sea turtles don’t fare well with the “coastal roads + strip of houses + strong street lights” setup that we humans tend to put along most beaches. This is one (of many) examples of species trying to shift their range in response to climate change, but in the process leaving the southern wildlife refuges & policies that had been set up to help them, and moving into more northern areas where no such protections yet exist. There is an interesting issue here of species moving faster than wildlife policy can keep up. (Same issue is occurring w N Atlantic right whales btw, which have just moved out of fisheries/shipping zones that were carefully arranged to not overlap w the whales, and into Canadian waters with no such regulations, the result being the worst die-off ever recorded, last summer. Ships smashing into them left & right, whales with horrific entanglements washing up dead. The Canadians have not had right whales up there before so it just took them all by surprise.) Anyway, sea turtle survival may eventually depend on residents of mid-latitude beaches that have not historically had turtles being willing to rapidly change beach lighting/traffic policy to encourage sea turtle nesting. These mid-latitude beaches are the ones that can produce the males in the future. For example, US coastal residents in Maryland, Virginia & Long Island can help by watching for turtle nests & reducing lighting when nests occur. Though... the pace of change may become so rapid that we may need to move eggs, physically, to northern beaches so that those individual hatchlings will imprint on northern beaches. This is known as “assisted migration” and it may become essential, especially when the beaches themselves start moving/flooding as sea level really begins to change. tl;dr - This is solvable if turtles can move to different nest sites, but we may need to help them move.
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412 farsidius The sex of a lot a reptiles are determined by the temperature at which the eggs incubate. I used to raise and breed several species of old world chameleons and I could skew the sex ratios of the clutches by altering the temperature of the incubators. In only takes a couple of degrees change. This is shift in the sex ratios of the turtles is a very obvious indicator of temperature change in these regions.
191 0ldgrumpy1 Would global warming mean that new beaches become suitable for the turtles to use? Transfering eggs to cooler area beaches would give a reverse sex imbalance on those beaches.
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315 sammyb67 What is the normal ratio?
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112 [deleted] [removed]
137 BlackNerve Oh I can see the puns and commentary about this already. I'm sorry to sound ignorant but how is it that temperature determines sex? What is the science behind this? And what does this mean, collectively, with such a wide ratio between female:male? Would it mean that we could theoretically engineer an environment (lower sand temps) to increase the male population?
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