Score
Title
27240
Al Yankovic's Album on Sale next to Michael Jackson's.
23911
Rocking dat ass.
6959
Wholesome news!
20749
Saudi Arabia accidentally prints textbook showing Yoda sitting next to the king
30332
A jump through the ring
4633
No, you hang up [OC]
7998
Fan gets surprised by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson
4750
26 years ago today, Nirvana released the album "Nevermind".
3885
DeVito in Color, oil, 16 x 20 in
4156
Thinking Two Steps Ahead
7660
Birth control vending machines installed in college campuses. UC Davis is offering students the morning after pill, condoms, and pregnancy tests inside the convenience of a vending machine on campus.
5569
Imbrium
4545
You know what to do.
11227
Mileena the Hitchhiker (Cosplays not mine)
7501
Mom wasn't the pilot, but she was a tech on the F-4 Phantom back in the 80's.
7020
meirl
3675
The dangers of a fast hashbrown
11062
Geht wählen meine Dudes!
9373
Tools: What Companies Make Which Brands [OC]
2456
My daughter throwing a pumpkin, or is she making it levitate with the force?
2867
Order when you're ready
3040
Hey Kid!
17545
My dad crying after I tell him I passed the bar exam. My dad wanted to be a lawyer when he was a young man in Nicaragua but he had to escape with my mom and sister due to the civil war in the 80s. I was born years later & somehow made my way to be a lawyer & couldn’t do it without him. Love my dad.
6550
A quintessentially Edinburgh picture with my 2 favourite buildings
3400
An Italian funeral
5080
Heart Condom
24482
Love knows no fences.
5222
Guts Over Fear
3446
An East German soldier passing a flower through the Berlin Wall before it was torn down, 1989 [730x1102]
14144
I accidentally replicated the same random integers as my textbook on my first try.
14205
Squad dead, 1 grenade 1 opportunity
12273
Damn irresponsible people
2329
hmmm
3814
Lego skeleton (x-post r/midlyinteresting)
3184
Nestlé, Unilever, P&G Among Worst Offenders for Plastic Pollution in Philippines Beach Audit
2452
???ased ???ony
26639
Flag respect?
1863
Found a moth on my jeep that has the face of a French bulldog
32189
An orangutan's sheer enjoyment of a magic trick
4919
Hidden Lake - Poland / Kashubian Region [2000x2000]
2503 28f272fe556a1363cc31 Just FYI, this has not been 100% settled in the US. Some courts are ruling one way, other courts another way. The Supreme Court needs to rule on this and give us some stability. http://gizmodo.com/can-we-please-make-a-decision-on-police-unlocking-iphon-1795721375 In the mean time, I agree with OP.
2639 itty53 > They will never use that information to exonerate you, it will ALWAYS BE USED AGAINST YOU. Dont give them the chance. [Obligatory YouTube video, "Never Talk to the Police"](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-7o9xYp7eE), because seriously, this is spot on. Absolutely nothing you say or provide the police will ever help you if they suspect you of a crime. Nothing. That is not a hyperbole, that is not anti-cop rhetoric, it is simply the process of criminal law. And this applies to *any and all information*. Especially verbal. Jump to 8:00 in that video for the quick explanation, but honestly, watch the whole thing. Thank me later.
310 MildlyExceptional If you've ever been fingerprinted your prints are already insecure.
632 Hairy_Beartoe Also, FYI (for the new IOs) if you press the side button five times quickly it will lock your iPhone, disable the biometric unlock, and require a passcode. Useful if you’re ever pulled over, going through customs, etc. and want to keep your privacy. Edit: to clarify, this will only work for iPhones with iOS 11 which will be released later this month.
255 [deleted] [deleted]
31 grandzu This tip still wouldn't have helped the lawyer in the example
60 homelessscootaloo Indeed, always use a numeric passcode to unlock your phone.
51 ortusdux Biometrics are are usernames, not passwords. You cannot change your biometrics.
164 3226 > It turns out that there are more people on earth than unique fingerprints. That's not really true. I used to make fingerprint powders, so I know a little bit about this. Put simply, points where the individual friction ridges start, end, meet or separate are the defining 'minutiae' (along with pores in the skin) that allow you to identify someone. (also known as level 3 features.) If you fully map a fingerprint, no two people have ever been shown to have the same fingerprints. Not anywhere near. But if, instead of looking at the whole finger, you just take a certain number of these points for identification, you create a chance that you can mix two people up. If you only looked at one point, that's completely useless. Two points is not going to do much. Different countries police forces have used different numbers of these minutiae as their threshold for have a reasonable probability that fingerprints do or do not match. And the use depends on the situation. If you have five suspects, and one murder weapon with fingerprints, it is much easier to be sure you're matching the fingerprint to the right person, even if you use fewer features. If you take a few features and stick in in the database of every fingerprint you have, you've got a vastly higher number of people so you'd need to use more minutiae to avoid the higher odds that you'd mix someone up.
43 Sabin10 YSK that biometrics make great user names but shitty passwords.
2495 0 28f272fe556a1363cc31 Just FYI, this has not been 100% settled in the US. Some courts are ruling one way, other courts another way. The Supreme Court needs to rule on this and give us some stability. http://gizmodo.com/can-we-please-make-a-decision-on-police-unlocking-iphon-1795721375 In the mean time, I agree with OP.
2632 0 itty53 > They will never use that information to exonerate you, it will ALWAYS BE USED AGAINST YOU. Dont give them the chance. [Obligatory YouTube video, "Never Talk to the Police"](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-7o9xYp7eE), because seriously, this is spot on. Absolutely nothing you say or provide the police will ever help you if they suspect you of a crime. Nothing. That is not a hyperbole, that is not anti-cop rhetoric, it is simply the process of criminal law. And this applies to *any and all information*. Especially verbal. Jump to 8:00 in that video for the quick explanation, but honestly, watch the whole thing. Thank me later.
308 0 MildlyExceptional If you've ever been fingerprinted your prints are already insecure.
630 0 Hairy_Beartoe Also, FYI (for the new IOs) if you press the side button five times quickly it will lock your iPhone, disable the biometric unlock, and require a passcode. Useful if you’re ever pulled over, going through customs, etc. and want to keep your privacy. Edit: to clarify, this will only work for iPhones with iOS 11 which will be released later this month.
255 0 [deleted] [deleted]
35 0 grandzu This tip still wouldn't have helped the lawyer in the example
60 0 homelessscootaloo Indeed, always use a numeric passcode to unlock your phone.
48 0 ortusdux Biometrics are are usernames, not passwords. You cannot change your biometrics.
162 0 3226 > It turns out that there are more people on earth than unique fingerprints. That's not really true. I used to make fingerprint powders, so I know a little bit about this. Put simply, points where the individual friction ridges start, end, meet or separate are the defining 'minutiae' (along with pores in the skin) that allow you to identify someone. (also known as level 3 features.) If you fully map a fingerprint, no two people have ever been shown to have the same fingerprints. Not anywhere near. But if, instead of looking at the whole finger, you just take a certain number of these points for identification, you create a chance that you can mix two people up. If you only looked at one point, that's completely useless. Two points is not going to do much. Different countries police forces have used different numbers of these minutiae as their threshold for have a reasonable probability that fingerprints do or do not match. And the use depends on the situation. If you have five suspects, and one murder weapon with fingerprints, it is much easier to be sure you're matching the fingerprint to the right person, even if you use fewer features. If you take a few features and stick in in the database of every fingerprint you have, you've got a vastly higher number of people so you'd need to use more minutiae to avoid the higher odds that you'd mix someone up.
44 0 Sabin10 YSK that biometrics make great user names but shitty passwords.