Score
Title
725
Official Discussion: Coco (US Release) [SPOILERS]
681
Denis Villeneuve Is the Sci-Fi Remake Master with 'Blade Runner 2049' and the Upcoming 'Dune'
282
Why it's called The Room
265
Ex Machina: Questioning the Human Machine
32334
For those who missed this 4 years ago - SNL Wes Anderson Parody
62
David Fincher Doesn’t Believe in ‘Auteur’ Filmmaking
63
Why are G-rated Films Not as Common Anymore in the US?
57
‘The Shape of Water’ Was Written and Designed to Jon Brion’s ‘Punch-Drunk Love’ Original Score
296
What movie has the best parents?
34
‘Aladdin’ Turns 25: Creators on the Real Beginning of the Disney Renaissance
813
Terry Gilliam Nears Completion of ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’
45
Poll: What are your favorite movies of 1993?
1362
The New Generation of Character Actors [Ben Mendelsohn, J.K. Simmons, Don Cheadle, Michael Shannon and Andy Serkis]
17
Guillermo Del Toro will interview Michael Mann and George Miller for two weeks each during his year-off from directing for upcoming documentary
248
Steven Spielberg, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese on the future of movies from 1990.
15
RocknRolla has my favorite "Heist gone wrong" scene ever
20
"Regarding Henry" (1991) by Mike Nichols is a film worth seeing just to see Harrison Ford play against type and show how versatile an actor he is
19
James & Dave Franco discuss "The Disaster Artist" with Simon Mayo
22
"Irréversible" - Making Of
256
How was the movie “The Void” (2016) made with only $82,000?
65
The Sisters Brothers (2018) - what an incredible cast!
11
Universal Pulls Sci-Fi Thriller 'Extinction' From Release Schedule, Starring Michael Pena and Lizzy Caplan
14
How much should reviewers know their own limitations? A case study of Observer reviewer Rex Reed
7
On Nov. 24, 1987, Neal Page met Del Griffith in the John Hughes comedy Planes, Trains & Automobiles. Hughes set the standard for Thanksgiving movies.
431
How ‘Disaster Artist's’ James Franco found art and heart in ‘The Room,’ the ‘Citizen Kane’ of bad movies
81
What are the worst short movies ever shown before a feature length movie?
371
What's your favourite instance of retroactive recognition in a movie?
12
Quintessential pre-code movies?
8
I filmed an erratic Tommy Wiseau Q&A and added subtitles
7
The death of Malcom in Spike Lee's Malcom X is one of the most brutal scenes I've ever seen. It's quite possibly Denzels best performance and Spikes best joint. Definitely one of the best films of the 90s
403
Thanksgiving - Trailer (Grindhouse)
229
Neil Jordan's "Byzantium" is a vampire film worth seeking with Saoirse Ronan and Gemma Arterton
4
Review: In ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas,’ Dickens as a Secret Documentarian
316
"Is Hollywood dying?" asks Dick Cavett in January 1972 to his panel of filmmaker guests, a mere two months before "The Godfather" is released and revitalizes the American film industry.
4
A quick recap of all the MCU trailers so far while we wait for the most anticipated one yet.
42679
Netflix, Amazon Should Be Recognized at the Oscars
11
Dating 101 with Viago, the 18th century dandy vampire from What We Do in the Shadows
1
'Suburbicon' reviewed by Mark Kermode
2
Your guilty pleasure
21
What are some "Top 3 must see" classic movies? (40s-70s)
50
30 Underappreciated Movies of The 'New Hollywood' Era
18 willianswalker I'd add John Cameron Mitchell's Shortbus. Also, though the movie isn't very good, Gus Van Sant's Psycho is an experiment worth remembering. Edit- Tangerine should be here too.
123 Stokkolm Nice list. Gravity should be up there. Using the ground/floor as a point of reference for what is shown in a frame is a core concept of filming and also human vision. Gravity throws all that away and puts us in an environment in which "up" and "down" are relative. Of course, not the first movie to use 0-G, but it used it in innovative ways. Also, Borat maybe? In a way it's basically hidden camera sketches thrown together, but the way Sascha Baron Cohen was able to improvise lines and react to unpredictable situations in character was pretty unique.
111 HaichPete O Brother, Where Art Thou? Is the most important film in the series of impacting 20th century cinema. That started the standard for color correction you see in every single movie today.
29 jawni Gonna plug Coherence. I don't think there has ever been a mindfuck movie done as subtlely or cohesively. What you think are continuity errors are actually important details that reframe what you're seeing.
25 Paddy2015 Maybe it will take a few years to judge what films were truly groundbreaking in terms of influence but Victoria, Under the Skin and Boyhood felt pretty innovative to me
50 TXDRMST I'm surprised "Locke" hasn't been mentioned. It's just Tom Hardy driving in his car, no other characters are ever shown on screen, only playing a role in the story through the phone calls he makes and receives. The viewer goes in knowing nothing about what's going on and his situation unfolds as the film progresses, revealing more and more about what's going on in his life. I thought it was ridiculously engaging with such a simplistic approach.
47 DatPiff916 Oldboy(original), Children of Men, City of God, Apocalypto, Bamboozled, Bronson I'm tempted to say 8 Mile simply because I thought it was pretty clever that the climax of the movie was basically wrapped into a few freestyles, it made a mediocre movie very enjoyable. I really really *really* want to say Tron Legacy, but while my heart is telling me yes, my mind is telling me no.
35 SleepingAntz If Avatar is up there for doing entire environments in CGI, then the Star Wars Prequels should be up there too. Not even trolling.
14 maurosQQ The longer I look at this the less I understand why some films are on there. Really weird and random list.
18 patrickwigington May I suggest the Star Wars prequels for their technical achievements? Jar Jar was the first motion capture main character, and Attack of the Clones was the first hollywood film shot entirely with digital cameras. Plus, the extensive use of computer animation has become typical in hollywood movies today.
45 Sinisterminister77 I'm a little surprised Birdman wasn't higher. That movie was innovative on multiple levels
6 maurosQQ I wonder a bit that Synecdoche, Adaption and Enternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind are all there, yet Anomalisa, which is imo the most inventive of Charlie Kaufmans movies, isnt on the list. Anomalisa did something with being that puppet film, that can only work as a puppet film. They way it visualized the characters perception was really incredible and inventive.
5 TheCaramelMan Memento
4 Moody_MadEye Fantastic list but I would personally switch The Lobster and Dogtooth.
4 Polskidro I really don't see how most of these are innovative.
13 Angeleyez1989 LOTR was one of the first movies that ushered in a lasting change to the way medieval based movies look. Gone are the braveheart and Robbin Hood Prince of Thieves days. X-Men made lasting changes to the look, set design and musical scores for many comic book movies following it. Before that each comic book movie franchise had its own look and feel that couldn't coexist is the universe of another franchise. For example Tim Burton's Batman universe can't really merge with Richard Donner's Superman. Judd Apatow movies also seem to have a very strong influence on today's comedies. Avatar always gets thrown out but 3D movies always come and go as passing fads. In addition to that, the rest of the movie looks very much like a James Cameron movie. The Marines look like they're from aliens. There is a fight involving mechanical suits sort of like the power loader on aliens. And the ships look like the drones from Terminator and the drop ship from Aliens. So I hesitate to say Avatar is innovative. These are examples of watershed movies that seem to have a lasting influence that still exists
8 vamrf El secreto de sus ojos
3 bhucewayne That's a strange list. Do you mean innovative in structure and form or technological innovation?
3 AimeeM46 i don't know about it being the most innovative film of the 21st century but DAVE MADE A MAZE blew me away with how original and creative it was. i've never seen a movie like it. it's a lot of fun and keeps getting more and more creative as the film goes along.
19 0 willianswalker I'd add John Cameron Mitchell's Shortbus. Also, though the movie isn't very good, Gus Van Sant's Psycho is an experiment worth remembering. Edit- Tangerine should be here too.
125 0 Stokkolm Nice list. Gravity should be up there. Using the ground/floor as a point of reference for what is shown in a frame is a core concept of filming and also human vision. Gravity throws all that away and puts us in an environment in which "up" and "down" are relative. Of course, not the first movie to use 0-G, but it used it in innovative ways. Also, Borat maybe? In a way it's basically hidden camera sketches thrown together, but the way Sascha Baron Cohen was able to improvise lines and react to unpredictable situations in character was pretty unique.
109 0 HaichPete O Brother, Where Art Thou? Is the most important film in the series of impacting 20th century cinema. That started the standard for color correction you see in every single movie today.
29 0 jawni Gonna plug Coherence. I don't think there has ever been a mindfuck movie done as subtlely or cohesively. What you think are continuity errors are actually important details that reframe what you're seeing.
24 0 Paddy2015 Maybe it will take a few years to judge what films were truly groundbreaking in terms of influence but Victoria, Under the Skin and Boyhood felt pretty innovative to me
51 0 TXDRMST I'm surprised "Locke" hasn't been mentioned. It's just Tom Hardy driving in his car, no other characters are ever shown on screen, only playing a role in the story through the phone calls he makes and receives. The viewer goes in knowing nothing about what's going on and his situation unfolds as the film progresses, revealing more and more about what's going on in his life. I thought it was ridiculously engaging with such a simplistic approach.
52 0 DatPiff916 Oldboy(original), Children of Men, City of God, Apocalypto, Bamboozled, Bronson I'm tempted to say 8 Mile simply because I thought it was pretty clever that the climax of the movie was basically wrapped into a few freestyles, it made a mediocre movie very enjoyable. I really really *really* want to say Tron Legacy, but while my heart is telling me yes, my mind is telling me no.
31 0 SleepingAntz If Avatar is up there for doing entire environments in CGI, then the Star Wars Prequels should be up there too. Not even trolling.
15 0 maurosQQ The longer I look at this the less I understand why some films are on there. Really weird and random list.
18 0 patrickwigington May I suggest the Star Wars prequels for their technical achievements? Jar Jar was the first motion capture main character, and Attack of the Clones was the first hollywood film shot entirely with digital cameras. Plus, the extensive use of computer animation has become typical in hollywood movies today.
47 0 Sinisterminister77 I'm a little surprised Birdman wasn't higher. That movie was innovative on multiple levels
5 0 maurosQQ I wonder a bit that Synecdoche, Adaption and Enternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind are all there, yet Anomalisa, which is imo the most inventive of Charlie Kaufmans movies, isnt on the list. Anomalisa did something with being that puppet film, that can only work as a puppet film. They way it visualized the characters perception was really incredible and inventive.
5 0 TheCaramelMan Memento
4 0 Moody_MadEye Fantastic list but I would personally switch The Lobster and Dogtooth.
4 0 Polskidro I really don't see how most of these are innovative.
12 0 Angeleyez1989 LOTR was one of the first movies that ushered in a lasting change to the way medieval based movies look. Gone are the braveheart and Robbin Hood Prince of Thieves days. X-Men made lasting changes to the look, set design and musical scores for many comic book movies following it. Before that each comic book movie franchise had its own look and feel that couldn't coexist is the universe of another franchise. For example Tim Burton's Batman universe can't really merge with Richard Donner's Superman. Judd Apatow movies also seem to have a very strong influence on today's comedies. Avatar always gets thrown out but 3D movies always come and go as passing fads. In addition to that, the rest of the movie looks very much like a James Cameron movie. The Marines look like they're from aliens. There is a fight involving mechanical suits sort of like the power loader on aliens. And the ships look like the drones from Terminator and the drop ship from Aliens. So I hesitate to say Avatar is innovative. These are examples of watershed movies that seem to have a lasting influence that still exists
8 0 vamrf El secreto de sus ojos
3 0 bhucewayne That's a strange list. Do you mean innovative in structure and form or technological innovation?
3 0 AimeeM46 i don't know about it being the most innovative film of the 21st century but DAVE MADE A MAZE blew me away with how original and creative it was. i've never seen a movie like it. it's a lot of fun and keeps getting more and more creative as the film goes along.