Score
Title
737
Official Discussion: Coco (US Release) [SPOILERS]
2071
Denis Villeneuve Is the Sci-Fi Remake Master with 'Blade Runner 2049' and the Upcoming 'Dune'
738
Why it's called The Room
141
‘The Shape of Water’ Was Written and Designed to Jon Brion’s ‘Punch-Drunk Love’ Original Score
340
Ex Machina: Questioning the Human Machine
86
Guillermo Del Toro will interview Michael Mann and George Miller for two weeks each during his year-off from directing for upcoming documentary
106
David Fincher Doesn’t Believe in ‘Auteur’ Filmmaking
96
Why are G-rated Films Not as Common Anymore in the US?
79
‘Aladdin’ Turns 25: Creators on the Real Beginning of the Disney Renaissance
32353
For those who missed this 4 years ago - SNL Wes Anderson Parody
317
What movie has the best parents?
62
Poll: What are your favorite movies of 1993?
28
On Nov. 24, 1987, Neal Page met Del Griffith in the John Hughes comedy Planes, Trains & Automobiles. Hughes set the standard for Thanksgiving movies.
36
James & Dave Franco discuss "The Disaster Artist" with Simon Mayo
24
Universal Pulls Sci-Fi Thriller 'Extinction' From Release Schedule, Starring Michael Pena and Lizzy Caplan
829
Terry Gilliam Nears Completion of ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’
1370
The New Generation of Character Actors [Ben Mendelsohn, J.K. Simmons, Don Cheadle, Michael Shannon and Andy Serkis]
25
"Regarding Henry" (1991) by Mike Nichols is a film worth seeing just to see Harrison Ford play against type and show how versatile an actor he is
254
Steven Spielberg, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese on the future of movies from 1990.
26
"Irréversible" - Making Of
66
The Sisters Brothers (2018) - what an incredible cast!
265
How was the movie “The Void” (2016) made with only $82,000?
16
How much should reviewers know their own limitations? A case study of Observer reviewer Rex Reed
85
What are the worst short movies ever shown before a feature length movie?
434
How ‘Disaster Artist's’ James Franco found art and heart in ‘The Room,’ the ‘Citizen Kane’ of bad movies
379
What's your favourite instance of retroactive recognition in a movie?
6
15 year old spoof Undercover Brother is even funnier today than it was in 2002
14
Quintessential pre-code movies?
4
NSFW [NSFW] Eli Roth's "trailer" for Thanksgiving
2
‘The Shape of Water’ Star Doug Jones: Beneath Foam and Latex, a Best Actor Candidate Shines
4
'Suburbicon' reviewed by Mark Kermode
6
I've been making videos featuring A-listers that were killed in horror movies before they were famous. Here's the Avenger's edition.
7
I filmed an erratic Tommy Wiseau Q&A and added subtitles
4
Your guilty pleasure
399
Thanksgiving - Trailer (Grindhouse)
231
Neil Jordan's "Byzantium" is a vampire film worth seeking with Saoirse Ronan and Gemma Arterton
321
"Is Hollywood dying?" asks Dick Cavett in January 1972 to his panel of filmmaker guests, a mere two months before "The Godfather" is released and revitalizes the American film industry.
2
A quick recap of all the MCU trailers so far while we wait for the most anticipated one yet.
42695
Netflix, Amazon Should Be Recognized at the Oscars
14
Dating 101 with Viago, the 18th century dandy vampire from What We Do in the Shadows
3
Review: In ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas,’ Dickens as a Secret Documentarian
65 Revayne I was thinking about this- I went to IT on opening night, and the cinema was wall to wall packed. I found parts of it creepy and unsettling, sure, but I certainly wasn't scared. I wonder though, what it would be like if I watched it for the first time at home alone, whether the environment would have made a difference. I think it might have.
56 NespreSilver I didn't think it was frightening, just a lot of jump scares. I still liked it, enough to see twice. The last really frightening film I saw was REC (Spanish version), and It Follows. But I don't really get scared by movies? You wanna talk scary? Video games. When you're actually participating, and have invested in the characters? 10x scarier than just sitting and watching. Alien: Isolation made me jump up, turn off my monitor, and leave the room.
114 Vully5789 IT doesn't need to be scary. It just needs to be a good film, which it is
28 slardybartfast8 It seems like anytime someone expresses the sentiment I'm about to it goes it "iamverybadass" territory, which I don't think it should, but here it goes. What does "scary" in a movie even mean? I'm sitting in a theater watching something on a screen. As an adult you can try to surprise me. You can thrill me. Put me on the edge of my seat. Make me pretty anxious. But scare me? That's just not a thing anymore. IT was a pretty solid movie. The clown was extremely entertaining and the performance was great. Many parts were suspenseful or disturbing. But scary? Cmon
27 JDriley The Witch was pretty disturbing
18 Jp2585 First step is not watching a horror flick in a crowded theatre. Watch it at home with the lights off, either with a good sound system or a good pair of noise canceling headphones.
20 dicknixon2016 I don't watch a ton of horror movies, but found Don't Breathe, It Follows, and Honeymoon to be a lot scarier. IT is a fun movie, but the scary scenes come in like a metronome and they try oh-so-hard to sell them (the crunch of the score, the "horror trailer" scream) that it doesn't scare as much as it could have if they didn't yell "BE SCARED!" at you. They had a great villain but only let him do his thing twice.
16 slowmotionjohns > Taste is subjective And it's also a discussion terminating cliche that people use to shut down criticism. Horror hasn't been legitimately scary for me for a long, long time. All of the usual criticism of horror turning into startle-porn is spot on, and the more you watch it, the more you learn how lazily filmmakers assemble and time their jump scares. Even the movies that horror aficiandos like to prop up like the fucking *Insidious* and *Conjuring* series are loaded to the gills with the same stupid shot construction, repetitious plot motifs, and tedious pacing. I prefer horror filmmaking more oriented toward surreal imagery, existential and disturbing interpersonal drama, and, as much I hate the culture surrounding this word, *frission.* The VVitch didn't scare me, but I got healthy doses of period-accurate dialogue, master-class acting, eerie imagery, and a thematically rich open-text experience from which everybody can walk away with something different. Thomasin's apotheosis shot more chills up my spine than every instance of Pennywise hurdling towards the camera, shaking his stupid clown cheeks combined.
11 diddles_giraffes Most recent horror that actually had me scared was The Conjuring. It Follows had a good sense of discomfort that came close. Same with It Comes at Night, my favorite movie this year so far.
10 black_flag_4ever I haven't seen the new IT but the problem is that if you see too many horror movies they stop scaring you. You might jump at a toaster moment but that's about all. I stopped watching most horror films for this reason because after a while you focus on the overall movie and realize that many horror films are actually poorly written, badly acted and have stupid plots. Now I tend to like the ones that are visually striking or are actually good. Oculus and Crimson Peak are the last horror films I saw that I liked mainly because of the imagery and poetic quality, almost like a good black metal album put on film.
7 chickenfries6 Last horror movie that I watched that scared me was El Orfanato (The Orphanage). I was like 15 or something when I saw it, though. But I do remember it having that tension that keeps you on the edge. At least for me. I can't recall any other movie at the moment, but I don't really watch horror movies that much. Mostly due to them being quite disappointing so often.
5 JAGUART I was more entertained and engaged than scared, which isn't necessarily a bad thing.
2 bigboysdontgiveashit I thought that Green Room was scary and gave me a very visceral reaction to it.
4 nooditty I *wanted* to be scared of IT but just wasn't. Although I enjoyed the film thoroughly. The last movie that really creeped me out was The Witch. The atmosphere was just dreadful (in the best way). It didn't rely on jump scares or CGI. A couple less recent ones that really creeped me out were The Descent, Incideous, And the early 2000s remake of Ammetyville Horror. IT had a couple of fun spooky moments, and Pennywise was creepy enough, but at no point was I experiencing the the dread that I love from truly scary movies.
3 HuffmanDickings Starry Eyes spooped me pretty hard. It's on netflix, i recommend.
66 0 Revayne I was thinking about this- I went to IT on opening night, and the cinema was wall to wall packed. I found parts of it creepy and unsettling, sure, but I certainly wasn't scared. I wonder though, what it would be like if I watched it for the first time at home alone, whether the environment would have made a difference. I think it might have.
58 0 NespreSilver I didn't think it was frightening, just a lot of jump scares. I still liked it, enough to see twice. The last really frightening film I saw was REC (Spanish version), and It Follows. But I don't really get scared by movies? You wanna talk scary? Video games. When you're actually participating, and have invested in the characters? 10x scarier than just sitting and watching. Alien: Isolation made me jump up, turn off my monitor, and leave the room.
114 0 Vully5789 IT doesn't need to be scary. It just needs to be a good film, which it is
28 0 slardybartfast8 It seems like anytime someone expresses the sentiment I'm about to it goes it "iamverybadass" territory, which I don't think it should, but here it goes. What does "scary" in a movie even mean? I'm sitting in a theater watching something on a screen. As an adult you can try to surprise me. You can thrill me. Put me on the edge of my seat. Make me pretty anxious. But scare me? That's just not a thing anymore. IT was a pretty solid movie. The clown was extremely entertaining and the performance was great. Many parts were suspenseful or disturbing. But scary? Cmon
27 0 JDriley The Witch was pretty disturbing
20 0 Jp2585 First step is not watching a horror flick in a crowded theatre. Watch it at home with the lights off, either with a good sound system or a good pair of noise canceling headphones.
22 0 dicknixon2016 I don't watch a ton of horror movies, but found Don't Breathe, It Follows, and Honeymoon to be a lot scarier. IT is a fun movie, but the scary scenes come in like a metronome and they try oh-so-hard to sell them (the crunch of the score, the "horror trailer" scream) that it doesn't scare as much as it could have if they didn't yell "BE SCARED!" at you. They had a great villain but only let him do his thing twice.
14 0 slowmotionjohns > Taste is subjective And it's also a discussion terminating cliche that people use to shut down criticism. Horror hasn't been legitimately scary for me for a long, long time. All of the usual criticism of horror turning into startle-porn is spot on, and the more you watch it, the more you learn how lazily filmmakers assemble and time their jump scares. Even the movies that horror aficiandos like to prop up like the fucking *Insidious* and *Conjuring* series are loaded to the gills with the same stupid shot construction, repetitious plot motifs, and tedious pacing. I prefer horror filmmaking more oriented toward surreal imagery, existential and disturbing interpersonal drama, and, as much I hate the culture surrounding this word, *frission.* The VVitch didn't scare me, but I got healthy doses of period-accurate dialogue, master-class acting, eerie imagery, and a thematically rich open-text experience from which everybody can walk away with something different. Thomasin's apotheosis shot more chills up my spine than every instance of Pennywise hurdling towards the camera, shaking his stupid clown cheeks combined.
10 0 diddles_giraffes Most recent horror that actually had me scared was The Conjuring. It Follows had a good sense of discomfort that came close. Same with It Comes at Night, my favorite movie this year so far.
11 0 black_flag_4ever I haven't seen the new IT but the problem is that if you see too many horror movies they stop scaring you. You might jump at a toaster moment but that's about all. I stopped watching most horror films for this reason because after a while you focus on the overall movie and realize that many horror films are actually poorly written, badly acted and have stupid plots. Now I tend to like the ones that are visually striking or are actually good. Oculus and Crimson Peak are the last horror films I saw that I liked mainly because of the imagery and poetic quality, almost like a good black metal album put on film.
6 0 chickenfries6 Last horror movie that I watched that scared me was El Orfanato (The Orphanage). I was like 15 or something when I saw it, though. But I do remember it having that tension that keeps you on the edge. At least for me. I can't recall any other movie at the moment, but I don't really watch horror movies that much. Mostly due to them being quite disappointing so often.
4 0 JAGUART I was more entertained and engaged than scared, which isn't necessarily a bad thing.
5 0 bigboysdontgiveashit I thought that Green Room was scary and gave me a very visceral reaction to it.
4 0 nooditty I *wanted* to be scared of IT but just wasn't. Although I enjoyed the film thoroughly. The last movie that really creeped me out was The Witch. The atmosphere was just dreadful (in the best way). It didn't rely on jump scares or CGI. A couple less recent ones that really creeped me out were The Descent, Incideous, And the early 2000s remake of Ammetyville Horror. IT had a couple of fun spooky moments, and Pennywise was creepy enough, but at no point was I experiencing the the dread that I love from truly scary movies.
3 0 HuffmanDickings Starry Eyes spooped me pretty hard. It's on netflix, i recommend.